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News tagged: Hype


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by Karl Bode 04:44PM Friday Sep 27 2013
Less than a year ago, every technology news outlet and blog was busy proclaiming that Intel's planned subscription broadband live TV service was going to revolutionize the TV industry. Intel (and by proxy bloggers buying into their hype) was bizarrely confident (mostly via anonymous press leaks) that this service would succeed where many before it failed, and would surely launch any day now.

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Neither the press or Intel seemed all too concerned with the fact that those other companies (including Sony, Google, Microsoft and Apple) failed because they ran face-first into content licensing restrictions and borderline shady agreements designed specifically to kill innovative new video delivery services in the cradle.

Not too surprisingly, by June of this year it was reported that Intel hadn't managed to strike a single content deal. It's now almost October, and insiders tell AllThingsD that Intel's service, tentatively called OnCue, still hasn't signed a single content partner, and is clinging to life support as it seeks out new funding and partners:
quote:
Intel executives, who have promised to launch a Web-based pay TV service by the end of 2013, are now looking for a strategic backer to help them fund and distribute the service. If they don’t find one soon, it’s possible the project will be scrapped...But Intel has yet to finalize a deal with a major TV programmer. And new CEO Brian Krzanich, who took over the company in May, has made a point of striking a tentative tone when discussing Intel’s TV ambitions.
Those partners have included Amazon, Samsung, and according to Variety, Netflix -- who refused Intel's advances. The launch of the service has been shifted to 2014 (if ever), and Intel's once boldly-optimistic rhetoric regarding the service has taken on a decidedly more cautious tone.

24 comments


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by Karl Bode 12:45PM Friday Sep 20 2013
A new study by NetNames commissioned by Comcast NBC Universal released this week tries to get a handle on the global scope of online piracy. According to the study, some 432 million people engaged in copyright infringement during January of this year in North America, Europe, and Asia-Pacific alone.
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70 comments


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by Karl Bode 10:31AM Wednesday Sep 04 2013
The entertainment industry and ISP joint "Copyright Alert System" (aka "six strikes) has had absolutely no impact on piracy statistics, judging from a preliminary look at popular BitTorrent website traffic levels. The six strikes program was launched back in February with the cooperation of major ISPs including AT&T, Verizon, Comcast and Time Warner Cable.
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by Karl Bode 09:03AM Tuesday Aug 13 2013
Last week the Obama administration tried to put some PR fluff out in front of the continually evolving NSA surveillance scandal by promising a suite of intelligence reform few believe they're actually going to seriously implement. As part of those reforms, the President promised an "high level group of outside experts" would be assigned to review and recommend changes at the NSA. As it stands, the government has announced that panel is going to be led by the NSA's James Clapper, a guy who has spent the lion's share of the last year lying to Congress and the public repeatedly (without penalty, I might add) about the NSA's practices and capabilities. As such, Obama's NSA "reform" will be much like the FCC's version of reform: oodles of theater, with little substance.

31 comments


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by Karl Bode 03:39PM Friday Aug 09 2013
Yesterday the Obama administration met with numerous companies involved in the government's domestic spy program (including the CEOs of Apple and AT&T), as well as privacy and consumer advocacy groups to discuss the government's ever-blossoming surveillance scandal. Today the administration unveiled the results of those talks, and stated they'll take four steps in an effort to appease critics:

• Obama claimed he'll work with Congress to reform Section 215 of the Patriot Act.
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33 comments


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by Karl Bode 10:44AM Friday Aug 02 2013
As noted earlier this week, Google is taking a lot of heat for fine print in the Google Fiber terms of service that technically prohibits servers. While some of the criticism is valid in that Google holds itself up to be different (though anyone who listens to corporations, or watched Google waffle on their open access promises really should probably know better), the frontal assault on the company has been somewhat overblown in that every ISP has some variety of this language buried in their TOS, and it's incredibly rarely enforced.
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by Karl Bode 12:02PM Thursday Aug 01 2013
Following on the heels of a similar offering by Time Warner Cable, Comcast has launched a new trial in Fresno that involves usage caps as low as 5GB a month on the company's Economy Plus broadband tier. The company's website and FAQ list the new plan as a "flexible data option," and as with Time Warner Cable's efforts -- users are promised a $5 discount off of their monthly bill if they're willing to have their broadband line capped at a paltry 5 gigabytes per month.
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110 comments


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by Karl Bode 08:56AM Thursday Aug 01 2013
From the "I'm not quite sure what you were expecting" department, NSA Director Keith Alexander didn't receive many hugs at this week's Black Hat security conference in Las Vegas. DefCon organizers had warned government employees to steer clear from their conference this year, given the increasingly sour mood over NSA's repeated lying before Congress (and everywhere else) and the Snowden leaks.
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by Karl Bode 12:38PM Wednesday Jul 31 2013
The other day I noted that an individual by the name of Douglas McClendon had filed a complaint with the FCC, claiming that the company's TOS language blocking the use of servers is a network neutrality violation. The story is primarily being driven by Wired's Ryan Singel, who first noted McClendon's complaint over at his blog, and now has a follow up piece over at Wired lamenting the fact that Google is "flip flopping on net neutrality."

His reports have resulted in all manner of Internet hand wringing and face fanning about how Google has turned evil because of this anti-server TOS language, including lamentations from folks like Apple brand apostle John Gruber, who can't help but gloat about his brand nemesis's troubles.
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by Karl Bode 12:39PM Tuesday Jul 30 2013
The other day I discussed how the United States broadband industry has been dramatically increasing the amount of disinformation, nonsense and sunshine pumping they usually engage in. There's two reasons for that.
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by Karl Bode 10:35AM Tuesday Jul 23 2013
*There has been a concerted push recently by the broadband industry to try and insist that the United States broadband market is secretly flawless, awesome and highly competitive, despite the fact that absolutely every independent source of broadband data (from Akamai and the FCC to the OECD and OOkla's Net Index) suggests we're absolutely and utterly mediocre at every metric that counts.

That's not to say we're not improving in some very select regions (thanks to things like Google Fiber, Verizon FiOS and DOCSIS 3.0), but overall we're quite indisputably, utterly average when it comes to broadband worldwide.
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by Karl Bode 02:44PM Friday Jun 07 2013
Long after this week's surveillance firestorm erupted, the White House has finally seen fit to grace the public with some justifications for their wholesale secret spying on pretty much everyone, everywhere, all the time. In a speech (full video here), Obama effectively stated that spying on such a ridiculous scale is a "critical" tool in the country's arsenal, and that both of the programs exposed in more detail this week were approved by Congress, and therefore perfectly ok.
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by Karl Bode 11:31AM Tuesday May 21 2013
While there has been some twitching from the corpse of LightSquared in DC, it has been fairly clear to everyone that the company has been dead for quite some time. Now insiders tell Bloomberg that Charlie Ergen made a $2 billion "stalking horse" bid to acquire LightSquared's assets and spectrum. One problem with such a deal -- the FCC still hasn't given their approval for use of the interference-prone spectrum, the core reason that LightSquared died in the first place. LightSquared has until May 31 to accept the bid. Dish has slowly been engaged in a series of spectrum acquisition deals to aid the company's potential launch of their own LTE network.

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by Karl Bode 12:34PM Tuesday Jan 08 2013
For a company whose U-Verse fiber to the node broadband service has consistently under-performed in the battle against cable, AT&T executives were very confident in future U-Verse speed claims while speaking at their developer conference this week at CES. AT&T recently announced that they'd be expanding their U-Verse footprint from 24.5 million homes to 33 million, though the company used some fuzzy math to make the expansion seem much larger than it was.
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by Karl Bode 03:46PM Wednesday Sep 26 2012
FCC boss Julius Genachowski has been busy lately paying lip service to Silicon Valley, most recently telling a bunch of Silicon Valley conference attendees that caps were something we should be "concerned" about, after telling cable companies just a few months earlier he thought caps and overages are nifty and innovative. Speaking again to Silicon Valley folks yesterday at a speech at Vox Media headquarters, Genachowski hashed out his muddy position a little further, again insisting he was "concerned" about caps -- sort of -- maybe:
quote:
(Growing usage) presents challenges for broadband providers in managing the growing loads on their networks while earning returns to drive capital investment in network upgrades and expansion.
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by Karl Bode 02:38PM Tuesday Jul 31 2012
Scott Cleland is a policy consultant paid by incumbent ISPs to sell his client's unfiltered Kool-Aid to reporters and politicians, and is frequently called to Washington as an "objective" industry analyst, despite his obvious role as little more than a paid parrot. You might recall that when we last saw Scott Cleland, he was busily beating up on Google for not investing in broadband infrastructure, despite billions spent on global fiber runs and storage capacity.
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by Karl Bode 10:32AM Wednesday Mar 07 2012
With LightSquared all but dead after being denied a necessary FCC spectrum condition waiver, LightSquared CEO Sanjiv Ahuja recently got out while the getting was good -- and Sprint is poised to untangle itself from the mess that is LightSquared. Sprint, who had struck a deal to use some of LightSquared's spectrum, had given the company two deal extensions to deal with their regulatory headaches caused by GPS interference. With LightSquared being unable to convince regulators they had an adequate plan to deal with that interference, Sprint now plans to officially kill the deal next week, according to anonymous sources.

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by Karl Bode 02:27PM Wednesday Feb 22 2012
Other countries have long been uncomfortable with the U.S. and ICANN's control over the Internet, and have consistently proposed new UN-based governance approaches designed to increase international input into Internet policy decisions.
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by Karl Bode 05:31PM Friday Jan 27 2012
Anybody who warns of an unavoidable capacity crisis on wireline or wireless networks is lying in order to sell you something. That may be a blunt assessment to some, but it's the only conclusion you can draw as we see time and time again that claims about a looming network apocalypse (remember the Exaflood?) violently overestimate future traffic loads and underestimate the ingenuity of modern network engineers.
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by Karl Bode 12:56PM Friday Dec 30 2011
The AT&T T-Mobile deal was shot down in large part because AT&T's claims that they needed T-Mobile assets to deliver LTE to 97% to the country simply weren't true. With the Qualcomm deal AT&T squats on more wireless spectrum than anyone (sans perhaps Verizon and their new SpectrumCO acquisitions) and certainly has the resources needed to deliver a cutting edge LTE network to the entire country.
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