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Callcentric page on DSLReports
Six Month Rating

Reviews:
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Review by snoopy0815 See Profile

  • Location: Wilmington,New Castle,DE
  • Cost: $15 per month
Good "clear web site design"
Bad "single data center - no geo-redundancy (as of 11/2012)"
Overall "can't recommend"
Web-site:
Ease of Installation:
Call Quality:
Reliability:
Tech Support:
Value for money:
(ratings match consensus)

**update 11/6: Just noticed CC deleted all their Hurricane Sandy status updates from Twitter when they were offline. Anything too hide?

I have been a customer for a year with CC and mostly it worked well. Sometimes DTMF would not work which is a pain since I join conference bridges every day. Occasional static in voice, but mostly good audio quality using G711.

However, during Sandy, I witnessed a marked contrast between CallCentric and competitors. During Hurricane Sandy:

- CallCentric went dead leaving me with no ability to re-route affected DIDs.

- Throughout Sandy and its aftermath, competitors provided detailed, comprehensive reporting to its customers about the status of its network and what steps it was taking to minimize service disruptions to customers. CallCentric's website, email and VOIP service by contrast, was completely down. Furthermore, nobody at CC established an alternative web presence during the outage. Its only communication to customers were a couple sub-160 character Twitter tweets per day.

- Competitor's NYC POP had generator backup power. CallCentric's did not.

- When concerns about the reliability of the generator at competitor's NYC POP arose, they moved their website from NYC to a mirror image they had ready at another location and redirected their NYC POP to their Seattle POP, all with minimal disruption to customers. CallCentric has no other point of presence than NYC. When its NYC POP went down, so did its entire network. (as of 11/2012)

After the first year with CC I am canceling my line and migrate to another provider which does have geo-redundancy as well as good and open communication to its customers.

member for 2.3 years, 21 visits, last login: 130 days ago
updated 2.3 years ago

Comments:
borntochill

join:2003-02-09
united state

Gosh, that sounds familiar.

I can't help but notice that your review lifts, nearly verbatim, remarks I just made in a thread on the VoIP tech chat forum. While I've heard that imitation is supposedly the highest form of flattery, I'd have much preferred if you had used your own words.

FWIW, my comments were intended as constructive criticism of CallCentric. I use their services as well as those of the competitor to whom I compared them. I am not porting out DIDs from CallCentric, but will wait to see if they take measures to address my concerns and the concerns expressed by others in the forum.

VexorgTR

join:2012-08-27
Sheffield Lake, OH
kudos:1
Reviews:
·voip.ms

Re: Gosh, that sounds familiar.

If CallCentric were not as cost effective as they are, I think that their customer loyalty wouldn't be what it is.

When working right, sound/performance is top notch. I could get that elsewhere, but it would cost double.

Hopefully they can have a long run of reliability

XANAVirus
Premium
join:2012-03-03
Lavalette, WV
Reviews:
·Callcentric

Re: Gosh, that sounds familiar.

If having phone service is that critical to you (and I presume it is), then you probably should have done your own due diligence and signed up for 2 or maybe even 3 competitors' VoIP services (or even gotten service from your Internet provider, if they have that).

After all, my service with Callcentric was down, but I had the backups with my cable Internet provider (who were up).
Of course, if my cable VoIP was down too, I'd have had cell phone service (and UPSes) to rely on.

I also had two different SMS texting services available to me, HeyWire and my own carrier's services, if voice service was down.
HeyWire was up, since they're probably not even hosted in the US to begin with.

Of course, I couldn't make calls through my usual number(s) but that's why you always give out at least 2 different numbers, registered with 2 or more different providers (based in different areas).

I hope you may have learned to not always trust your provider to seamlessly do fallover service (even providers with geographically distant sites can have complete outages).

You don't see me saying to Callcentric that I'm going to port out and cancel - no, because I had backups and backups of backups.

I was just fine, though a little distressed since I had to actually use my backup plans (and getting non-technical people to call you on a different line is hard).
borntochill

join:2003-02-09
united state

Re: Gosh, that sounds familiar.

said by XANAVirus:

If having phone service is that critical to you (and I presume it is), then you probably should have done your own due diligence and signed up for 2 or maybe even 3 competitors' VoIP services (or even gotten service from your Internet provider, if they have that).

I cannot speak for the original poster (even if he liberally "borrowed" language from a post that I made in the VoIP Tech Chat forum), but nobody said a word about whether or not they have a competitor's VoIP service as a backup so your scolding about about due diligence is as presumptuous as it is ridiculous. Speaking for myself, I do have secondary provider.

The only due diligence I failed on was assuming that CallCentric had a disaster recovery plan when, in fact, CallCentric has none at all. As a result, all of CallCentric's customers' numbers were dead for 2 days and it could have been much longer had it taken longer for Con Edison to restore power. What if a fire destroys the building at 11 Broadway? Or a plumbing flood severely damages their equipment? How long would CallCentric's customers be without phone service then?

Having a secondary provider is fine for restoring outgoing calls, but when CallCentric is down, incoming calls to numbers hosted at CallCentric fail. And there is absolutely no work-around for that.

Some have suggested having a second DID posted on a website or business card is an answer to that. It's a nice theory that regular customers who have called a business at one number for years (say, a local pizza place, hardware store, or other small business) will then hop onto the web to look for a secondary number, but that's not reality. They'll call another business instead. You're trying to lay the blame at the customer's door, when the provider is at fault.
Iscream
Premium
join:2009-02-17
New York, NY
kudos:6
Reviews:
·Verizon FiOS

Re: Gosh, that sounds familiar.

In all due respect - you have zero technical understanding of matters you're trying to speculate about and/or - you're trying to be a judge for! What a shame and abuse of freedom of speech.

There is a saying - "don't judge and you won't be judged".

When time permits - I'll try to explain more what the terms "redundancy" and disaster recovery actually mean when applied to the Real Telephony.
borntochill

join:2003-02-09
united state

Re: Gosh, that sounds familiar.

Iscream, you just said the same thing in the VoIP Tech Chat forum so I will repeat my response here too:

I know you are busy now, but I look forward to your explanation about your notion of what "disaster recovery" means, minus the insults and dripping condescension.

My "judgments" about how CallCentric handled this disaster were clearly spelled out in this post:

»Re: CC Disaster

That post received 5 "Approvals" from other users, including this forum's moderator. This is the most approvals I've received for a single post in the 10 years that I've been a member of DSLReports, so clearly I struck a chord with my remarks. If you respectfully want to tell me how and why I have it wrong, I look forward to that when you are ready, but I'm clearly not the only one with these concerns.
snoopy0815

join:2012-10-29
said by XANAVirus:

If having phone service is that critical to you (and I presume it is), then you probably should have done your own due diligence and signed up for 2 or maybe even 3 competitors' VoIP services (or even gotten service from your Internet provider, if they have that).

Sure, I have backups. One on the West Coast and one with Sipgate in Europe. Works great. Should the average Joe be required to have a backup sip account? I guess if there are providers out there that do not have redundancy then yes.
FCC should regulate this market and mandate redundancies for sip providers and fine them if it fails.

The point is CC's communication to customers was terrible and there were just so many things wrong with the whole story from a non SIP standpoint.
No redundant website
Twitter posts deleted
Still no summary from the ceo about the ddos attacks
no communication on refunds for outages due to ddos and flooding
..
end of story.
nitzan
Premium,VIP
join:2008-02-27
kudos:8

Re: Gosh, that sounds familiar.

said by snoopy0815:

FCC should regulate this market and mandate redundancies for sip providers and fine them if it fails.

Becareful what you wish for. If the FCC really does regulate the VOIP market and starts fining providers most providers you know will either close shop because the fines will kill them, or raise prices drastically to be able to keep up with the fines. I totally agree that every provider should have a disaster recovery plan in place and rather shocked that CC didn't (I always thought of them as a quality/reliable provider), but this kind of thing is better regulated by the market than the FCC. If people disagree with their handling of the situation the simple solution is find another provider that has a DR plan.

XCOM
digitalnUll
Premium
join:2002-06-10
Spring, TX
Reviews:
·Vestalink

Re: Gosh, that sounds familiar.

said by nitzan:

said by snoopy0815:

FCC should regulate this market and mandate redundancies for sip providers and fine them if it fails.

Becareful what you wish for. If the FCC really does regulate the VOIP market and starts fining providers most providers you know will either close shop because the fines will kill them, or raise prices drastically to be able to keep up with the fines. I totally agree that every provider should have a disaster recovery plan in place and rather shocked that CC didn't (I always thought of them as a quality/reliable provider), but this kind of thing is better regulated by the market than the FCC. If people disagree with their handling of the situation the simple solution is find another provider that has a DR plan.

+1
--
[nUll@dcypher ~]$