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The wiring that is on the streets or underground is of very high quality wire, therefore, the ADSL signal is almost always at full strength.

Unfortunately, if you have bad wiring in the inside of your house (multiple splices (if you are going to splice, learn the "Western Union Splice"), wiring draping near fluorescent lights, near sources of high amounts of electromagnetic radiation (such as electric wires), or just bad quality of wiring), you will lose some of the strength of the ADSL signal, thus decreasing your overall bandwidth.

If you have any of the above things happening, reroute your wire, install new wire without splices (remember, telephone equipment uses very low amounts of voltage, and everytime you splice, there is a chance to lose some of that low voltage), or replace your wiring.
Answer #2:
There are many factors that can affect DSL performance in your house. First thing to check though is that you have installed the DSL Line filters properly on every phone, fax, modem, or any other telephone device that shares the same line as your DSL
A big factor is quality of the wiring. Older wiring was generally a 4 wires (Red, Green, Black and Yellow) in an insulator. This is ok for a single short run but Twisted Pair (UTP) is better. UTP of a rating of Cat-3 or Cat-5 should be used because the wire is twisted to cancel out noise and interference picked up from the air. Also you should use the line cord that comes with your DSL Device to plug directing in to your phone jack. Using telephone extention cords cause alot or problems. Test this by moving your equipment closer to the telephone jack.
Secondly, most commonly houses were wires in a manner where all the jacks in the house are in series, running from the phone box outside to the first jack in to the house and then to the next jack and so on. So this adds a lot of splices and places for noise to be introduced onto the telephone line. Try running a dedicated home run back to the main connect point for your house with UTP. You may have to temporarily unhook the wiring to the house to test these. If that clears up your problems, you may have to rewire all your jacks in your house.

A Third factor is having too many and/or low quality phones plugged into the same line. Try unplugging all the phones, fax, answering machines, etc in your house that are on the same line. Be sure to check for things that like TV Entertainment units (DirectTV, Sega Dreamcast) or utility meter reading devices that may be connected as well as alarm systems. The are known to cause trouble and are not something that people think about but still could use the same line.

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by trparky See Profile


Also read About DSL for lots more information