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11.0 Wiring Diagrams and Schematics

Detailed instructions for testing your modem at the NID are available here.




Schematic and picture by Andy Houtz

Andy Houtz DSL

by Andy Houtz See Profile edited by FAQFixer See Profile
last modified: 2006-12-27 22:13:03

Below is a basic schematic for testing your modem at the INI (Indoor Network Interface). For detailed instructions please reference the INI Test FAQ. NOTE: If you live in a standard residential home please reference the NID Test FAQ and NID Test Schematic .

*Some modems (STH Test and Cayman Test) have the ability to test attainable line rate, relative bandwidth capacity, power, attenuation, and signal-to-noise ratio. If available, these measurements are the most accurate assessment of line quality.


Schematic by Andy Houtz

Andy Houtz DSL

by Andy Houtz See Profile edited by FAQFixer See Profile
last modified: 2006-12-27 22:12:29

RJ-45 modular connectors (AKA "8 Position 8 Contact" or "8P8C") are the default standard for Ethernet connectivity.
Very Important Note: The T-568B is the current default standard for almost all applications.


Reference chart by Andy Houtz


Andy Houtz DSL

by Andy Houtz See Profile edited by FAQFixer See Profile
last modified: 2009-04-01 13:08:41

A crossover swaps the transmit and receive pairs. Important Note: A crossover cable is not the same as a reverse polarity cable.




Diagrams by Andy Houtz

Andy Houtz DSL

Feedback received on this FAQ entry:
  • always manage to find very detailed and accurate information on this site. Keep up the great work guys.

    2013-02-22 07:45:52 (DlinkChimera See Profile)

  • Hi, Thanks for the information on the crosover pinout,I really appreciated keep up a good work.Have a good day. Bam

    2009-12-06 21:19:58

  • Hi, Thanks for the information on the crosover pinout,I really appreciated keep a good work.Have a good day. Bam

    2009-12-06 21:19:07

  • Hi, Thanks for the information on the crosover pinout,I really appreciated keep a good work.Have a good day. Bam

    2009-12-06 21:17:46



by Andy Houtz See Profile edited by FAQFixer See Profile
last modified: 2009-04-01 12:54:04

A polarity cable swaps the positive and negative signals on the transmit and receive pairs. Important Note: A polarity cable is not the same as a cross over cable.




Diagrams by Andy Houtz DSL


by Andy Houtz See Profile edited by FAQFixer See Profile
last modified: 2009-04-01 12:53:33

Wiring is usually solid color or banded/striped. Below are the the first three wire pairs and their respective colors.


Reference chart by Andy Houtz

Andy Houtz DSL

by Andy Houtz See Profile edited by FAQFixer See Profile
last modified: 2006-12-27 22:11:52

RJ-11 and RJ-14 Female Jack from the outside looking in. RJ-11 is the common standard for most phones and POTS devices.


Reference chart by Andy Houtz


Andy Houtz DSL

Feedback received on this FAQ entry:
  • Thank you for this! I was trying to figure out how the striped wires could possibly match the color scheme on the wall plate. You just saved me about 3 to 4 hours of trial and error. Thank you!

    2009-09-29 11:27:29



by Andy Houtz See Profile edited by FAQFixer See Profile
last modified: 2006-12-27 22:11:34

Standard RJ-11/RJ-14 Wall Plate Jack.


Schematic by Andy Houtz

Andy Houtz DSL

by Andy Houtz See Profile edited by FAQFixer See Profile
last modified: 2006-12-27 22:10:28

Some modems are designed to receive the DSL signal on the "outer pairs" (pins 2 and 5) instead of the "inner pairs" (pins 3 and 4) of an RJ-11 jack. You can use a line swapper or you can rewire your wall plate as shown. Note: If you rewire the wall plate as shown you will not be able to use most standard equipment that requires the "inner pairs".


Schematic by Andy Houtz

Andy Houtz DSL

Feedback received on this FAQ entry:
  • When the lines are swapped why are the tip and ring wires also crossed over? Whether the equipment is looking for a signal on the inner pair or the outer pair it doesn't make sense why you would also change the tip and ring position. Am I missing something or is there a mistake in the drawing?

    2012-05-15 14:15:02



by Andy Houtz See Profile edited by FAQFixer See Profile
last modified: 2008-05-02 11:51:30

IFITL (Integrated Fiber In The Loop) is a 10Mb ethernet connection and does not require a DSL modem. It does however require a PPPoE client for connectivity. You can use a stand alone client such as BellSouth Connection Agent, RasPPPoE, or the native PPPoE client on Windows XP on the computer. You can also use a router as shown here.

IFITL requires a specialized, dedicated 10Base-T Protector and IFITL EBN (Entrance Bridge Network) be placed inside the customer's NID. Since IFITL installation use a completely separate line there is no need for inline microfilters on the POTS devices.

Important Note: IFITL also requires a crossover be built into the wiring before the NIC. The guidelines for placing the crossover varies and can be wired at the 10base-T protector, the IFITL EBN, or the wall plate inside the house. Most (but not all) technicians rewire the wall plate as the crossover point so standard CAT5 wiring can be used between the wall plate and the NIC or router (if present).






Pictures by Andy Houtz

Andy Houtz DSL

by Andy Houtz See Profile edited by FAQFixer See Profile
last modified: 2006-12-27 22:09:06

NIDs (or TNIs) come in a variety of styles as shown here. Depending on the age of the NID and type of the wiring used, the color codes and connections can vary. Please reference these FAQs for more information:
RJ-11 Color Codes
RJ-11 Wall Plate Schematic




Schematic and picture by Andy Houtz

Andy Houtz DSL

by Andy Houtz See Profile edited by FAQFixer See Profile
last modified: 2006-12-27 22:08:34

Telco color code.

B=blue
O=orange
G=green
Br=brown
S=slate (not grey)
W=white
R=red
Bk=black
Y=yellow
V=violet (not purple)

Tip: Pairs

White 1-5
Red 6-10
Black 11-15
Yellow 16-20
Violet 21-25

Ring: Pairs

Blue First Pair 1,6,11,16,21
Orange Second Pair 2,7,12,17,22
Green Third Pair 3,8,13,18,23
Brown Fourth Pair 4,9,14,19,24
Slate Fifth Pair 5,10,15,20,25

Binders:

B/W 1-25
O/W 26-50
G/W 51-75
Br/W 76-100

And on and on.

FWIW Telco cable is built in 25 pair groups or binders. Any cable over 25 pairs will have binders which are the 25 pairs twisted and then wrapped in a multi-colored colored string (old days) or two colored plastic binders.

For example a pair in a 25 pair cable consisting of a black wire with blue stripe mated with a blue wire with a black stripe is pair 11. Now lets go to a cable with over twenty five pairs and lets say the same pair was in a binder/group wrapped with a brown/white string it would be pair 86. Make sense?

Wayne

by Splitpair See Profile edited by jazzman916 See Profile
last modified: 2006-04-05 18:48:59

Best Filter Installation Advice:
Due to basic differences in design, it is best to consult the installation instructions and diagrams provided by your ISP or filter manufacturer. It is critical that you install the filters correctly. Failure to do so will create poor performance and speeds. It may even keep the modem from synching at all.

Typically, there are two common types of DSL filters:
Dual Line Filter - One line input and two outputs. One output is marked "Phone" and is used to connect to all POTS devices. The other ouput is marked "DSL/HPN" or "Data" and is used to connect the DSL modem.
Single Line Filter - One line input and one phone only output. The single output marked "Phone" is used to connect to all POTS devices (not modems).





Andy Houtz DSL

Feedback received on this FAQ entry:
  • A dual line filter means its designed for a two lines (not that it has two jacks)..Single line 1 line system

    2011-02-11 13:39:28



by FAQFixer See Profile