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3.2 Networking

You can hook everything up to a hub, however Comcast's standard HSI package only allots you one IP address, so technically you could only use one computer at a time using this setup.

If you have purchased more than one IP address with your account, you may then configure each computer with a unique IP address and access the service through a hub with no problem.

If you want to hook up your whole LAN, we suggest look into a router or some NAT software (ie. WinRoute)

*This FAQ is based on user knowledge from a volunteer core of BroadbandReports' members. This FAQ in no way constitutes official information from Comcast or any of its affiliates.

by kadar See Profile edited by Johkal See Profile
last modified: 2008-11-01 15:01:15

For 2 computers:
You will need 3 network cards, 2 for the main computer (1 for modem and 1 for switch/hub/computer) and another one for your client.

One computer acts as a server. This computer has two NIC cards in it. One is connected to the modem and the other is connected to your switch/hub/computer.

The main computer must be turned on if the other wants access to the internet. The main computer will have your connection software on it, and you'll use that to connect. The second computer has a NIC card installed and is connected to the switch/hub/computer. You can try Internet Connection Sharing supplied with Windows, or sharing software like AllAboard, Sygate, or Wingate.

- OR -

Buy a router. Each computer needs just one NIC card. You connect the modem and computers to the router. Set your router to "Obtain an IP address automatically" and it will connect for you. Both computers can use the connection independently of each other.

- OR -

You can use a hub, but will need a subscription to a Comcast Business account to get additional IP addresses.

*This FAQ is based on user knowledge from a volunteer core of BroadbandReports' members. This FAQ in no way constitutes official information from Comcast or any of its affiliates.

by kadar See Profile edited by Johkal See Profile
last modified: 2013-08-22 15:09:39

First things first, let's get the equipment list for what you'll need to network:
    Cable Modem with built-in WAN port.
    Broadband Router - see here.
    Network Interface Card
    Ethernet Cables(also known as LAN[Local Area Network] cables) - see here.

Now, for an example of how an Network is setup - we'll use a two computer network; see outline below:


Now that you have your network setup - let's get everything configured ..

First, we want to configure the Network Interface Card to Obtain an IP Automatically - this can be done by accessing your Network Properties. This should be done on all computer(s) being networked. Now, we want to access the Router Configuration page. If you need assistance accessing the router - please use one of the forum(s) Hardware Forum(s) below to seek assistance:
More Support forums can be found here. Be sure to be as detailed as possible about your setup and device model.

Once, you've sucessfully accessed the router config page - you want to set your router to Obtain an IP Address(No User Name or Password required). Now, locate the page that will allow you to enable the MTU - which should be set for 1500.

Once all of the outlined above is setup - save your settings and power off all of your equipment. Power everything back up in this order: Modem, Router, Computers. Test your connection.

Note: If you're attempting to setup any Virtual Private Networking - view the: VPN: Virtual Private Networking FAQ

*This FAQ is based on user knowledge from a volunteer core of BroadbandReports' members. This FAQ in no way constitutes official information from Comcast or any of its affiliates.

by drake See Profile edited by Johkal See Profile
last modified: 2008-11-01 15:01:48

Comcast provides and authorizes 1 dynamically assigned IP address per Residential High-Speed Internet account. You have the option of subscribing to a Comcast Business account to get additional IP addresses.

Thanks TD Nickell See Profile

*This FAQ is based on user knowledge from a volunteer core of BroadbandReports' members. This FAQ in no way constitutes official information from Comcast or any of its affiliates.

by Johkal See Profile
last modified: 2013-08-22 15:13:21

Here are several forums to review at BBR:

Belkin
Buffalo Tech
Cisco
D-Link
Linksys
Netgear
SMC
Other Manufacturers


• Additional resource:

SmallNetBuilder is a good site as of October 30, 2009 for a comparison of router performance. Thank you for that link, n0xlf See Profile.

*This FAQ is based on user knowledge from a volunteer core of BroadbandReports' members. This FAQ in no way constitutes official information from Comcast or any of its affiliates.





by kadar See Profile edited by Johkal See Profile
last modified: 2013-09-15 13:38:08

A hub is a device that connects PCs together. In general, what is called a hub in todays market is a "dumb" device. In a hub, when one PC sends data onto the wire, the hub simply forwards the packets to all the other devices connected to it. Each device is responsible for determining which packets are destined for it and ignoring the others. Current "hubs" typically share bandwidth between all the ports. In the days of coaxial networking, hubs were often called "bridges". Because they forward every packet that they receive, they do nothing to streamline the traffic on your local network.


A switch is a little smarter than a hub, in that it records the IP and MAC addresses in a table of all the devices connected to it. Thus, when a packet is put onto the wire by one device, the switch reads the destination address information to determine if the destination device is connected to it. If it is, the switch forwards the packet ONLY to the destination device, sparing the other devices connected to it from having to read and deal with the traffic (making your network more efficient). If the switch does not recognize the destination device, then the switch sends the packet to everything connected to it, thereby requiring the devices to decide for themselves whether or not the packet is for them. In general, switches provide each device connected to them with dedicated bandwidth.


A router is the "smartest" device of them all. A router records the address information of everything connected to it like a switch. But it also records the address of the next closest router in the network. (You can program this as the "default gateway.") A router reads even more of the information in the address of a packet and makes an intelligent decision about what to do with the data based on the address. For example, if a router receives an outbound packet that has a destination address that is not in it's table, it forwards the packet to the default gateway, rather than every device attached like a switch does. This is how data moves onto, and through, the Internet. Routers are also capable of looking at the source address of a data packet and making decisions based on that as well. This means they can tell the difference between traffic that originates on your network and traffic that comes from outside. Switches and hubs can't do that (at least in a home user's price range). This means that if a router receives an inbound packet that is addressed to something not attached to it, it simply drops it and your local network doesn't have to deal with it. A switch would forward it to all your networked devices and force them to decide whether or not is should be read. This can clog up your local network with useless traffic.


This is also the fundamental difference between the devices and why the router is better for your application. Let's look at security for a minute. Say I'm a hacker and I get the IP of one of your computers somehow. So I send data to you. A switch will look at the destination address, recognize it, and send the packet right on to your computer. A router on the other hand, can be programmed to look at the source address as well. You could set a rule that says if a packet originates from outside your local network, do not forward it no matter what (although this would be stupid because you would never get any data -- but it could be done). Thus, a router can protect you from attacks in ways that no hub/switch ever could.


This is a pretty simple view of the differences. Remember the names are not fixed in stone. There are so-called "intelligent hubs" that act as switches, and "Layer 3" switches that can do things like a router.




*This FAQ is based on user knowledge from a volunteer core of BroadbandReports' members. This FAQ in no way constitutes official information from Comcast or any of its affiliates.



by kadar See Profile edited by Johkal See Profile
last modified: 2013-12-26 12:05:11

BBR has it's own Networking forum, located here:
Networking Forum

*This FAQ is based on user knowledge from a volunteer core of BroadbandReports' members. This FAQ in no way constitutes official information from Comcast or any of its affiliates.

by kadar See Profile edited by Johkal See Profile
last modified: 2008-11-01 15:02:31