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55.0 ... Network Interface Cards

When the network cable has not been unplugged at either the computer or the router, this message is a sign that the router may have either powered down or rebooted.

Note: This also occurs on wireless networks with Windows XP, Windows XP SP1, and Windows Server 2003. In that case it means that the wireless network link was broken. It also is a sign that the router may have either powered down or rebooted.

Related FAQ:
Why does my router reboot?

by funchords See Profile
last modified: 2006-01-06 17:05:15

Issues:

•You may have corrupted wireless profiles that cause WPA or 802.1X connections to fail,
•You may have corrupted wireless profiles that cause WEP or unencrypted connections to behave like WPA or 802.1X connections.
•You have deleted a driver, client, service, or protocol and cannot restore it.
•You are lost in the maze of networking issues and simply want to return to the default network settings.

Possible Solution:

As a trouble-shooting step, you may want to reinstall your network card drivers and configuration in order to fix corruption in its drivers or to return to the default network settings in Windows XP. Unfortunately, searching Windows Help does not give advice on how to do this.

The step-by-step help for this is found in the Help file for Device Manager.

1. Open Device Manager (Choose Start, Run, devmgmt.msc)
2. Make the following selections: Help, Help Topics, Device Manager, Uninstall and Reinstall Devices, Reinstall a Plug and Play device.

Notes:
1. You normally do not need to physically remove the device.
2. As this is intended to reset your configuration to the defaults, any saved wireless profiles or other custom network settings will be lost.

by funchords See Profile
last modified: 2006-01-06 17:04:26

When using Windows XP with more than one network card selected, a "Bridge Connections" feature appears on the right-click menu. This feature allows you to link two different network segments and pass traffic between them.

Issue:

When using "Bridge Connections" between certain wireless cards and wired Ethernet cards, the bridge appears to be created but no traffic is being passed and part or all of the network is not reachable.

Solution:

Once the bridge is created, you need to force the D-Link adapter into "Promiscuous Mode."

Please see the following two articles:
Windows XP Home Networking: Building Network Bridges
Bridge May Not Work With a Non-Promiscuous Mode Network Adapter

Note: Before issuing the commands mentioned in the Knowledge Base article, create the Bridge first. Otherwise, the commands fail.

by funchords See Profile
last modified: 2006-01-09 12:58:04

This may happen with wireless software that conflict with the Wireless Zero Config (WZC) service. See »support.microsoft.com/default.as···s;821400 for details.

by mjf See Profile edited by funchords See Profile
last modified: 2006-01-09 12:58:57

For reasons that are not clear, this issue occurs in several versions of the D-Link adapter Setup programs. A file called REG.EXE is found to be running and consuming a significant percentage of the processor, which makes the system performance suffer.

Reports are that the D-Link setup process leaves a shortcut to REG.EXE in the All Users' Startup directory, which launches a copy of REG.EXE that exists in the D-Link "Program Files" directory. REG.EXE is an operating system file for updating the system registry. It is not unusual for installation programs or scripts to use REG.EXE in the process of configuring the system, but it is unusual to have that program run repeatedly.

Users may notice that their system performs slowly, that video/audio is choppy, or that Task Manager reports REG.EXE is consuming a high percentage (90-100%) of the available CPU time.

Following the below steps will safely solve the problem:
    •Open Windows Explorer (Right click on the Start button, then click Explore)
    •Navigate to C:\Documents and Settings\All Users\Start Menu\Programs\Startup
    •Locate the file or icon referring to REG.EXE and right click on the icon, choose Delete. When prompted whether to move the program to the Recycle Bin, say Yes. Note: Do not delete any other D-Link files or shortcuts in this folder.
    •Navigate to C:\Program Files\D-Link\AirPlus G Wireless Adapter Utility (This directory might have a slightly different name depending on the adapter model.)
    •Locate the file or icon referring to REG.EXE and right click on the icon, choose Delete. When prompted whether to move the program to the Recycle Bin, say Yes.
    •Restart your computer.


by funchords See Profile
last modified: 2006-01-06 17:01:28

The D-Link wireless Configuration Utility software is designed to detect whether the Windows Zero Configuration service is controlling the wireless network card.

When Windows is controlling the wireless configuration, the Configuration Utility disables access to the configuration pages.

If you wish to use the Configuration Utility instead of the Windows Wireless Zero Configuration service:

1. Go to Network Connections (from the left panel of My Network Places)
2. Right click on the icon for your wireless network card, and choose Properties
3. In the Properties dialog box, choose the middle "Wireless Networks" tab
4. Uncheck the box on the top that enables Windows management of wireless connections
5. Click OK

A reboot is recommended (see note).

The Configuration Utility will detect that Windows is not managing the connection and will give you access to its own configuration options.

Should you want to re-enable the Windows Wireless Zero Configuration service, simply go back through the steps and check the box that you unchecked before.

Note: If you are using any form of WPA or 802.1X security, you will likely need to reboot the computer before you will be able to access your wireless Access Point -- even if it is configured correctly.

by funchords See Profile
last modified: 2006-01-09 13:00:08