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1.0 IPv6 Information

FAQ's are created and maintained through the input of site members. If you have something that you would like to have added or see information that may need to be changed in this FAQ please contribute by visiting this link.

by Optimized See Profile
last modified: 2004-03-03 18:45:42

IP version 6 (IPv6) is a new version of the Internet Protocol, designed as a successor to IP version 4 (IPv4) which is what is currently in use.

by Optimized See Profile
last modified: 2004-02-28 11:56:41

Because IPv4 is 32 bits, it has about 4,300,000,000 address space in a decimal number. This amount is absolutely insufficient for the Internet world wide because it is smaller than the population of the world. According to calculations, that will exhaust the addresses in about year 2008 +/- 3.

by Optimized See Profile
last modified: 2004-02-28 11:57:02

In late 1990, The Internet Engineering Task Force (IETF), together with engineers from within the Internet community, recognized the usage trends and the then current shortcomings of the Internet. Rather than scrap the existing Internet, these people wanted to maintain all the good things about it, while extending its capabilities. To do this they created IPv6. Designed to interoperate with existing products that use IPv4 (for example, hosts and routers), IPv6 provides both the infrastructure for the Next Generation Internet and a means to deploy new services that leverage the enhanced and new features of the protocol.

by ironwalker See Profile

The U.S. Government is putting its considerable weight behind a push towards IPv6. For example, the Defense Department with its $30 billion budget has been buying only IPv6-compliant networking gear since October 2003, and aims to have full IPv6 compliance by 2008.

by ironwalker See Profile

IPv6 is a rapidly evolving standard. Some of the information provided in this FAQ may have been made obsolete at some point by newer developments.

If you notice such a change or have additional information to add to the FAQ please let us know.

by Optimized See Profile
last modified: 2004-03-02 14:20:15

Current and future challenges of mobile and wireless Internet can only be met by IPv6. IPv4 can merely provide costly, limited, inefficient, insecure, and patchy solutions to today's and tomorrow's problems. IPv6 further improves upon its predecessor by allowing new services to be added over time.

IPv6 appears to be the only solution for the truly mobile and wireless Internet, both from the users' and the service providers' perspective.

Read about it here.

by ironwalker See Profile edited by Optimized See Profile
last modified: 2004-03-05 19:01:32

It may be that your service provider has already rolled out IPv6. You can check here;

»www.sixxs.net/tools/ipv6calc/

by ironwalker See Profile
last modified: 2004-12-10 20:16:54

Then you can try and find a tunnel broker that gives you a IPv6 in IPv4 address. this is transmitting everything about IPv6 over protocol 41 and you will get a IPv6 address, with which you can browse the IPv6 internet.

Most tunnel brokers require you to have the tunnel open 24/7, though. A number of big tunnel brokers have been set up, among which are in europe »www.sixxs.net/ , in canada »www.freenet6.net/ and Hurricane Electric »ipv6.he.net/ .

by alien9999999 See Profile edited by ironwalker See Profile
last modified: 2004-12-20 16:07:16

Yes,theres no need for special equiptment.

by ironwalker See Profile

Broadbandreports.com does not have an IPV6 webserver at this time, but it may have one in the near future, it will then be reachable at »ipv6.broadbandreports.com and »www.ipv6.broadbandreports.com .

Feedback received on this FAQ entry:
  • Why wouldn't there simply be an AAAA record for www? Why make it harder to find? From my reading it appears the AAAA record is preferred over the A record providing seamless integration into both networks.

    2011-03-16 18:45:00



by alien9999999 See Profile edited by ironwalker See Profile
last modified: 2004-12-20 16:06:35

The following types of addresses are unicast IPv6 addresses:


Global unicast addresses


Link-local addresses


Site-local addresses


Special IPv6 addresses


Compatibility addresses

by elite17 See Profile edited by ironwalker See Profile
last modified: 2005-03-13 21:33:29

Mac OS X is basically IPv6 ready. You can setup a IPv6 to IPv4 tunnel by following the instructions found here
There is also a great blog related to mac & IPv6 found here

Feedback received on this FAQ entry:
  • I have a blog, http://www.whatismyipv6.com/blogs/macipv6/wordpress/, that covers MacOSX IPv6 connectivity tips and techniques. You might want to point to it! -mel

    2009-08-19 16:21:05



by Optimized See Profile edited by ironwalker See Profile
last modified: 2009-08-19 18:40:20

Nearly all IPv6 functionality for *BSD operating Systems was developed by the KAME project. With time more and more of their code makes it into the platforms FreeBSD (4.0), NetBSD (1.5), OpenBSD (2.7) and MacOS X (10.2). This means, that from the respective versions on, IPv6 will be switched on and available on all those platforms by default. You don't need to do anything. You can verify this with the command "ifconfig".

# ifconfig
rl0   flags=8943 mtu 1500
        inet 128.176.184.9 netmask 0xffffff00 broadcast:128.176.184.255
        inet6 fe80::2e0:18ff:fe50:b5da%rl0 prefixlen 64 scopeid 0x1
        ether 00:e0:18:50:b5:da
        media: Ethernet autoselect (100baseTX )
        status: active

The "inet6" line gives the presence of an IPv6 stack away. That means your *BSD host is already operating as a dual-stack host, deciding itself, when to use which kind of transport.

by ironwalker See Profile

Everything needed to configure IPv6 under Linux.

»www.tldp.org/HOWTO/Linux+IPv6-HOWTO/

by ironwalker See Profile
last modified: 2005-03-09 01:35:13

Solaris 8 and later versions of the OS from Sun Microsystems fully support IPv6. The IPv6 implementation incorprates all basic services and functionalities of the protocol as well as IPv6-in-IPv4 tunnelling. Previous versions of Solaris can be patched with IPv6 but will still not have full support of the protocol.

by ironwalker See Profile

IPv6 is enabled either during the installation procedure or by executing the following four steps:

* 1. Create an empty file by the name of "hostname." for every interface that is to support IPv6, e.g.:

# touch /etc/hostname6.hme0

* 2. Reboot
* 3. Excecute the following command for every interface that is now IPv6-enabled:

# ifconfig inet6 plumb up

This initializes the IPv6-Stack (inet6) for every interface.

Note for Solaris 9 users: We have been told that this step is no longer neccessary on the newer version of Solaris. The corresponding interfaces are automatically initialized.
* 4. At last excecute the script "/etc/init.d/inetinit". If more than one interface was enabled with IPv6 (or on Solaris 9, when the file "/etc/inet/ndpd.conf" is present) this will enable IPv6-forwarding and procedures like router advertisements and the routing protocol RIPng . If only one interface with IPv6 support is present only the neighbor discovery procedure will be started (as client). In any case this behaviour can also be changed by editing the "inetinit" script.

by ironwalker See Profile

Windows XP (SP1 + Update q817778)
Windows XP with Service Pack 1 was the first Microsoft OS to include IPv6 officially out of the box. It is not switched on by default though. In oder to switch it on one has to open a command shell (MS DOS box) and type

c:\ netsh interface ipv6 install
c:\ netsh interface ipv6 set privacy disabled persistent

Without update q817778 it's "ipv6 install".

In an output of "ipconfig /all". The host had no native IPv6 connectivity and also did not find an ISATAP server although it did configure the interface ("Automatic Pseudo Tunneling-Interface") with only link-local ISATAP-addresses. You can see that your host last resorted to configuring 6to4 and also assigned link-local IPv6 addresses (fe80::/10) to all interfaces.

Feedback received on this FAQ entry:
  • thanks alot very helpful

    2010-03-09 20:23:07

  • 6to4 is not the last resort, in fact - if you have a public IP 6to4 is preferred. Also, Teredo deserves atleast(!) a mention ... /TJ ... trejrco@gmail.com

    2009-04-20 15:32:28



by ironwalker See Profile

To uninstall IPv6, simply enter

c:\ netsh interface ipv6 uninstall

in the command shell. Please note that unlike after installation, a reboot is neccessary to fully uninstall the protocol.

by ironwalker See Profile

Windows 2003/.NET Server
Windows 2003 of course also includes IPv6 support out of the box. But it still isn't switched on by default. Next to the command line option to install IPv6, this version of Windows also includes the option to install the IPv6 protocol through the graphical user interface. This way should even be prefered and under no circumstance should the two ways be mixed, when installing/uninstalling the protocol. That is, don't use the graphical user interface to install IPv6 and then try to uninstall it via "ipv6 uninstall" in the shell or vice versa. Some strange things happen then, at least in a few cases when we tried that out. However the usual way through the graphical user interface works just fine, so there's no need to experiment with the command line just for installing IPv6.

IPv6 is installed by opening the network properties of the current LAN connection (right-click on "My Network Places", go to "properties", right-click on LAN-Connection, again go to "properties"). The tab "General" includes the functionality to install additional network protocols. Just click on "Install" and search for "Microsoft TCP/IP Version 6" in the list of protocols. Select it and click "Ok". IPv6 is now installed and enabled. You don't even need to reboot.

Uninstall by deselecting the "ipv6" protocol in network properties of the current lan connection.

by ironwalker See Profile

Microsoft itself does not support IPv6 for Windows 95/98 or NT4. There is however an IPv6 implementation from Trumpet by the name of Winsock which can be installed on these Windows versions (and even on Windows 3.1). The software is not free. There is also a try-out version availabe for a 30 day trial period, downloadable on their website.

Unfortunately the authors of this Howto have no experience with using this software and would like to refer the interested reader to the documentation that comes with Trumpet's Winsock implemenation itself.

by ironwalker See Profile

Microsoft released an IPv6 Technology Preview for Windows 2000. This software can be installed on Windows 2000 hosts with Service Pack 1 installed. It is pre-productional and was derived from a research IPv6 implementation that was originally only intended for application developers.

The "Microsoft IPv6 Technology Preview" packages includes the following command line utilities (executable via the command shell) used to configure and monitor the IPv6 functionality of the host:

* net.exe: Utility that stops or starts the IPv6 protocol and unloads/loads it from/to the memory. The relevant commands are

c:\ net start tcpipv6
c:\ net stop tcpipv6

* ipv6.exe: Basic utility that configures network interfaces and updates the routing table. It also retrieves and displays information about the IPv6 protocol.
* 6to4cfg.exe: Utility that sets up and configures 6to4.
* ping6.exe, tracert6.exe: The IPv6 versions of the well-known utilities.
* ttcp.exe: Utility that sends TCP or UDP data between two network nodes. Usefull to test speed and throughput both for IPv4 and IPv6.
* ipsec.exe: Utility that configures policies and security associations for IPv6 IPsec traffic.

The Preview supports stateless IPv6 address autoconfiguration. Therefore, if there's a router on the link advertising a global prefix, the Windows 2000 host will automatically configure a global IPv6 address for its interface and set the IPv6 default route correctly when tcpipv6 is started (s.a.). Stateless Autoconfiguration is usually sufficient but if addresses should rather be configured manually the tool ipv6.exe tool is used.

1. To see, how all or a specific interface are configured, use the following command:

c:\ ipv6 if [if#]

2. To add an address to a specific interface, the following command is used:

c:\ ipv6 adu / [lifetime VL/PL] [anycast] [unicast]

If neither prefered nor valid lifetimes are specified the default is "infinite". If the parameter is set to zero the IPv6 address is removed.
3. The following command configures a few special attributes of an IPv6 interface. It enables or disables the interface to forward IPv6 packets or to send router advertisements both of which features are needed when the host should be used as a router. It also sets the MTU and the "site identifier" (aka prefix to advertise):

c:\ ipv6 ifc [forwards] [advertises] [-forwards] [-advertises] [mtu <#bytes>] [site ]

4. The tool is also used to configure routes. The following command adds a route entry to the routing table. Aside from the route itself also a time to live, preference value and wether or not the route should be published via some routing protocol can be set.

c:\ ipv6 rtu / [liftime L] [peference P] [publish] [age] [spl ]

5. To display all IPv6 routes, use the following command:

c:\ ipv6 rt

Warning: IPv6 configuration is not saved permanently. If not added to an executable start script any configuration will be lost upnon reboot/restart of the IPv6 stack.

Also, for windows 2000 with service pack 4;
Grab the "IPv6 Technology Preview for Windows 2000" here;
»www.microsoft.com/downloads/deta···yLang=en
and follow these instructions to get it to install on service pack 4:
1. Save the file tpipv6-001205.exe from the download page to a local folder (for example, C:\IPv6TP).
2. From the local folder (C:\IPv6TP), run Tpipv6-001205.exe and extract the files to the same location.
3. From the local folder (C:\IPv6TP), run Setup.exe -x and extract the files to a subfolder of the current folder (for example, C:\IPv6TP\files).
4. From the folder containing the extracted files (C:\IPv6TP\files), open the file Hotfix.inf in a text editor.
5. In the [Version] section of the Hotfix.inf file, change the line NTServicePackVersion=256 to NTServicePackVersion=1024 (768 for SP3), and then save changes.
--5a. From the folder containing the extracted files (C:\IPv6TP\files), open wship6.dll in a hex editor.
--5b. Go to offset $3D64 (15716 decimal) and change the string "ip6.int." to be "ip6.arpa.". Make sure the editor is in overwrite/replace mode rather than insert mode. There is plenty of room to modify the string. This fixes a later change regarding reverse lookups. See RFC3152
6. From the folder containing the extracted files (C:\IPv6TP\files), run Hotfix.exe.
7. Restart the computer when prompted.
8. After the computer is restarted, continue installing the Microsoft IPv6 Technology Preview for Windows 2000 starting at step 3 of the "Installing the IPv6 Technology Preview for Windows 2000" section of either the Introduction to the Microsoft IPv6 Technology Preview for Windows 2000 or the Readme.htm file in the folder containing Setup.exe (C:\IPv6TP).

Feedback received on this FAQ entry:
  • here's slight change.. I just discovered a few days ago about a bug in wship6.dll and have a fix for it. Please change the install instructions like so, or just renumber, thanks. 5a. From the folder containing the extracted files (C:\IPv6TP\files), open wship6.dll in a hex editor. 5b. Go to offset $3D64 (15716 decimal) and change the string "ip6.int." to be "ip6.arpa.". Make sure the editor is in overwrite/replace mode rather than insert mode. There is plenty of room to modify the string. This fixes a later change regarding reverse lookups. See RFC3152

    2008-11-30 06:52:28 (davygrvy See Profile)

  • Grab the "IPv6 Technology Preview for Windows 2000" @ http://www.microsoft.com/downloads/deta layLang=en and follow these instructions to get it to install on service pack 4: 1. Save the file tpipv6-001205.exe from the download page to a local folder (for example, C:\IPv6TP). 2. From the local folder (C:\IPv6TP), run Tpipv6-001205.exe and extract the files to the same location. 3. From the local folder (C:\IPv6TP), run Setup.exe -x and extract the files to a subfolder of the current folder (for example, C:\IPv6TP\files). 4. From the folder containing the extracted files (C:\IPv6TP\files), open the file Hotfix.inf in a text editor. 5. In the [Version] section of the Hotfix.inf file, change the line NTServicePackVersion=256 to NTServicePackVersion=1024 (768 for SP3), and then save changes. 6. From the folder containing the extracted files (C:\IPv6TP\files), run Hotfix.exe. 7. Restart the computer when prompted. 8. After the computer is restarted, continue installing the Microsoft IPv6 Technology Preview for Windows 2000 starting at step 3 of the "Installing the IPv6 Technology Preview for Windows 2000" section of either the Introduction to the Microsoft IPv6 Technology Preview for Windows 2000 or the Readme.htm file in the folder containing Setup.exe (C:\IPv6TP).

    2008-11-28 22:56:10 (davygrvy See Profile)



by ironwalker See Profile
last modified: 2008-11-30 12:43:29

Yes there is one that has several IPv6 tools to use online. See »www.ipv6tools.com

by Skipdawg See Profile edited by ironwalker See Profile
last modified: 2005-04-02 17:26:07