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13. Terms

@ - Seeing this symbol before someone's nickname means that they are a channel operator (op, +o).

by Michelle4 See Profile edited by removed See Profile
last modified: 2003-09-01 23:04:23

In an IRC channel, when you see a user with a % symbol in front of their nickname in the nick list, that means that user has halfop status in that channel.

by Michelle4 See Profile edited by removed See Profile
last modified: 2003-09-01 23:55:02

On an IRC channel, if you see someone with a + in front of (or in some clients behind) their nickname, that means that person is voiced (+v) on that channel.

+ is also used to set modes on IRC. When you see a channel/user mode prefixed by a + symbol, it means that mode is in effect.

by Michelle4 See Profile edited by removed See Profile
last modified: 2003-09-01 23:53:44

(+b) To ban someone means to disallow them from entering the channel. A person who is kicked may also be banned so they cannot rejoin.

Feedback received on this FAQ entry:
  • хачу зделать для банов клана игроков Чтобы их расматревал админ медоратор издатель для игры Договора Войн

    2014-03-03 11:55:39



by Michelle4 See Profile edited by removed See Profile
last modified: 2003-09-01 23:06:13

OPs pretty much operate the channel. Operators (ops) have the most power. They control everything that happens. They can change topics, kick, ban, op others, and do much more. They are generally people you should listen to. ;)

by removed See Profile
last modified: 2003-08-31 23:50:31

If an OP wants to, they can set mode +m in the channel. This means that the channel is moderated. This allows the operator to voice (+v) someone so they can talk. Anyone without a voice is not allowed to talk in the channel.

Images:

With no voice:


With voice:


Additional note:
If the channel is not moderated, the voice option is frequently used as a status symbol. When there is no +m, voices have no more privileges than the regular users.

by removed See Profile

(%, +h) Gives a user some of the same privileges of channel operators (+o, @) over the channel. Halfops have the ability to change the channel topic, and to kick/ban anyone from the channel who isn't an operator.

Most networks do not use the halfop feature.

by Michelle4 See Profile edited by removed See Profile
last modified: 2003-09-01 23:11:13

This entry pretty much explains the purpose of +v.

Feedback received on this FAQ entry:
  • link says: If an OP wants to, they can set mode +m in the channel. This means that the channel is moderated. This allows the operator to voice (+v) someone so they can talk. Anyone without a voice is not allowed to talk in the channel.

    2013-01-19 23:04:36

  • except it doesn't...

    2012-09-11 23:43:49



by removed See Profile

Used on some IRC servers to silence a user in a channel - much like +m, but for one person.

by ftzsee See Profile edited by removed See Profile
last modified: 2003-09-02 00:06:40

Flood means to receive so much information so fast on your screen that you are disconnected from the server. A person can be "flooded" if they type the /list command (will often happen on large networks where there are thousands of channels) or if they receive a lot of CTCP commands at one time. You can also flood yourself off by sending too much information to a channel at one time, i.e. pasting seven or eight lines of text at once in the channel window.

by Michelle4 See Profile edited by removed See Profile
last modified: 2003-09-01 23:04:45

Short for "Client To Client Protocol"

A CTCP command sends messages to other people's IRC clients, who will then send a reply back. Ping is a common CTCP request.

by Michelle4 See Profile edited by removed See Profile
last modified: 2003-09-01 23:05:23

A network is a connection of various server computers that together create a place in which users can join channels and communicate with each other and/or send or receive files. DALnet, EFnet, and Undernet are all examples of IRC networks.

by Michelle4 See Profile edited by removed See Profile
last modified: 2003-09-01 23:06:25

One who compromises machines and makes them FTP/XDCC services.

by removed See Profile

One who scans for insecure machines and gives results to rooter.

by removed See Profile

From Valinor IRC Glossary:

Sometimes two IRC Servers will lose contact with each other. This causes the IRC network to be split into two halves (usually of uneven sizes!) and to behave for a while as if they were two separate networks.

by removed See Profile

Fills FTPs in warez channels -- this is pretty much how your XDCCs get their files.

by removed See Profile

From eggheads.org:

Eggdrop is the world's most popular open source Internet Relay Chat (IRC) bot. Originally created by Robey Pointer in December 1993 for use on a channel called #gayteen, it has spawned an almost cult like following of users. It is a feature rich program designed to be easily used and expanded upon (using Tcl scripting) by both novice and advanced IRC users on a variety of hardware and software platforms.

by removed See Profile

From Valinor IRC Glossary:

A k-line is a line in an ircd.conf file that can be used to prevent certain people, or people from certain computers or networks, from connecting to that server. IRC Operators can add klines while the server is running, to ban someone causing trouble, perhaps for running clones.

by removed See Profile

From DALnet:

The term IRCop stands for IRC Operator -- not IRC Cop or mIRC Cop as some believe (it's important to make the distinction between IRC and mIRC since mIRC is a program used to access IRC; there are many other IRC clients besides mIRC). They may also be referred to as an oper.

IRCops are users who have access to commands that allow them to administrate their server or the network. They usually have more experience with IRC and the DALnet network than normal users, and are therefore qualified to deal with problematic situations. Please note that they are all volunteers and do not get paid for their work.

by removed See Profile

The time it takes for what you type to reach others' screens. Netsplits can cause high lag times. Users on the same server usually don't have a problem with lag being high between them. Using a server that is also physically located closer to you can also help reduce lag times. You can use /ping nickname or /ctcp nickname ping to check lag.

by Michelle4 See Profile edited by removed See Profile
last modified: 2003-09-01 23:08:43

A server is a computer linked with other server computers in the same network. For example, DALnet is a network, and jade.dal.net and mesra.dal.net are both servers on the DALnet network.

by Michelle4 See Profile edited by removed See Profile
last modified: 2003-09-01 23:09:08