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4.2 Jargon and Acronyms

This, and most other information technology terms are well explained at WhatIs.com. Good alternates are TechEncyclopedia and Webopedia.

by climbers See Profile
last modified: 2003-12-23 20:24:46

It's perfectly acceptable to ask in a thread where you see an acronym. Techies tend to use more than their fair share of acronyms and other jargon, and they are not always forthcoming about what they mean, assuming that if they know them, everyone does.

If you are too shy to ask in a thread, or it looks like something that you should know based on the context of its use, you can always visit The Acronym Finder. They've got all the biggies, including DSLR and BBR.

by Mospaw See Profile edited by climbers See Profile
last modified: 2003-12-20 13:23:08

The shortcut speech used in IM's, posts, and chat rooms changes almost daily, but some are with us forever. This link explains the most common ones, as well as some of the often-used emoticons: WebSlang.

An alternate source for these kinds of acronyms is the Internet Acronyms Dictionary.

by Post_It See Profile
last modified: 2004-09-07 19:44:06

It's an emoticon, an ASCII glyph. A fairly complete list is here: Emoticons. The standard set of Broadbandreports.com graphical smilies is here, although you are not limited to those, and can link to thousands found all over the web.

by climbers See Profile edited by Post_It See Profile
last modified: 2004-09-07 19:40:43

The L# system is a replacement for the over used LOL. More information can be found at the Official Website

by C_ See Profile edited by tmpchaos See Profile
last modified: 2004-06-09 18:24:32

quote:
LE3T 5PE4K I5 wH3N j00 +4Lk l1kE THi5. t0 uNDEr$+@ND j00 mu5+ Be l3e+. 1pH jo0 4RE noT lEeT jo0 C4Nnot SPe@K or rE4d tH1$.

Hacker slang can be found in the 1337 Dictionary. More traditional hacker language is in the classic Jargon File.

by climbers See Profile
last modified: 2003-12-23 20:23:12

Now, it's mostly a nostalgic piece of history dating from the days of Bitnet and Listserv. But there was a time when you were nobody if you didn't have one of your own...a time when people were proud of their geekiness!

An example:

-----BEGIN GEEK CODE BLOCK-----
Version: 3.1
GE/M/S/TW d@? s:(-) !a C(++++) UHC*(+++)@ P+ L E W>-- N(+) o K-- w(+++) O M V PS@ PE@ Y(++) PGP(++++) t 5 X R tv? b$ DI D G(+++) e(+++++) h(++)@>++ r$ z*$
------END GEEK CODE BLOCK------

In the days of slow access, you could tell someone a whole lot about yourself in a very concise way, by including your personal Geek Code as a signature.

Real geeks memorized every code, and could read them like regular text.

Who knows, it may enjoy a revival. The documentation is still around. There is a translator, and for lazy people, a generator.

by climbers See Profile

Holding down the ALT key, type the number to the left of the symbol you want on the KEYPAD.

(For the full Unicode set, see this link: Unicode.)


0032
0033 !
0034 "
0035 #
0036 $
0037%
0038&
0039'
0040(
0041)
0042*
0043+
0044,
0045-
0046.
0047/
00480
00491
00502
00513
00524
00535
00546
00557
00568
00579
0058:
0059;
0060<
0061=
0062>
0063?
0064@
0065A
0066B
0067C
0068D
0069E
0070F
0071G
0072H
0073I
0074J
0075K
0076L
0077M
0078N
0079O
0080P
0081Q
0082R
0083S
0084T
0085U
0086V
0087W
0088X
0089Y
0090Z
0091[
0092\
0093]
0094^
0095_
0096`
0097a
0098b
0099c
0100d
0101e
0102f
0103g
0104h
0105i
0106j
0107k
0108l
0109m
0110n
0111o
0112p
0113q
0114r
0115s
0116t
0117u
0118v
0119w
0120x
0121y
0122z
0123{
0124|
0125}
0126~
0127
0128
0129
0130
0131
0132
0133
0134
0135
0136
0137
0138
0139
0140
0141
0142
0143
0144
0145
0146
0147
0148
0149
0150
0151
0152
0153
0154
0155
0156
0157
0158
0159
0160
0161
0162
0163
0164
0165
0166
0167
0168
0169
0170
0171
0172
0173
0174
0175
0176
0177
0178
0179
0180
0181
0182
0183
0184
0185
0186
0187
0188
0189
0190
0191
0192
0193
0194
0195
0196
0197
0198
0199
0200
0201
0202
0203
0204
0205
0206
0207
0208
0209
0210
0211
0212
0213
0214
0215
0216
0217
0218
0219
0220
0221
0222
0223
0224
0225
0226
0227
0228
0229
0230
0231
0232
0233
0234
0235
0236
0237
0238
0239
0240
0241
0242
0243
0244
0245
0246
0247
0248
0249
0250
0251
0252
0253
0254
0255



Alternatively, you can use the Character Map program.

For MACs, this is a good site:

»tlt.its.psu.edu/suggestions/inte···mac.html

Or use the Character Palette:

»www.osxfaq.com/DailyTips/12-2004/12-29.ws

by climbers See Profile
last modified: 2005-09-09 17:55:40

Then you need a translator!

»www.transl8it.com/cgi-win/index.pl

by climbers See Profile