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2. Hardware Issues/Setup

A Network Interface Card, often abbreviated as NIC, is an expansion board you insert into a computer so the computer can be connected to a network. Most NICs are designed for a particular type of network, protocol, and media, although some can serve multiple networks. To be connected to the AT&T Broadband network your computer must have a NIC or a USB adapter.

by redxii See Profile

Abbreviation of interrupt request line, and pronounced I-R-Q. IRQs are hardware lines over which devices can send interrupt signals to the microprocessor. When you add a new device to a PC, an IRQ is usually assigned to the new device automatically; however, sometimes you may need to set its IRQ number manually. Setting an IRQ manually specifies which interrupt line the device may use. IRQ conflicts used to be a common problem when adding expansion boards, but the "Plug-and-Play" specification has removed this headache in most cases.

by redxii See Profile

An IRQ is basically a work order sent by a peripheral device to the microprocessor in a computer. A processor will interrupt the task it is performing and execute the new instruction provided by the IRQ. When the new instructions have been completed, the processor returns to its prior task.

An IRQ conflict occurs when two devices have been assigned to the same IRQ. Since multiple signals to the computer on the same interrupt line might not be understood by the computer, a unique value must be specified for each device
and its path to the computer. Please note that some peripherals can share the same interrupt, but many cannot.

To determine the particular IRQ
conflict you have on your PC:
    •Close or minimize all applications so you can access your desktop
    •Right-click on the My Computer Icon
    •Select PROPERTIES
    •The System Properties window will appear
    •Select the Device Manager tab
    •Highlight computer by clicking on it once
    •Select PROPERTIES
    •A new window will appear
    •Verify that you are working in the View Resources tab
    •Put a dot in the radio button next to INTERRUPT REQUEST (IRQ)
    •A list of numbers, 00 through 15, will appear with each number having either a designated hardware component using the corresponding setting or an available status
    •Write down the listed IRQs and memory addresses in use by your system (you'll then be able to use this information to determine what IRQs and memory addresses are available if a conflict exists)
    •Click OK to return to the Device Manager tab
    •Verify that the radio button is selected next to View Devices by Type
    •If your system has an IRQ conflict, the Device Manager will highlight the device with a conflict with an exclamation point inside of a yellow circle (to see each device listing, you may need to expand each device section under the COMPUTER heading by clicking once on the plus (+) sign next to the device name)
    •If an exclamation point inside of a yellow circle appears next to any device, you may access more information about the conflict by highlighting the malfunctioning device and clicking the PROPERTIES button
    •Once in the Properties window, click the RESOURCES tab
    •The Resources tab provides resource settings and a conflicting device list which may help resolve the IRQ conflict
If you have identified
an IRQ conflict, you may want to consider one of the following actions:
    •If the IRQ conflict involves your Mediacom Broadband-supported NIC or resulted from the installation of the Mediacom Broadband software, please send Mediacom an e-mail. Have your IRQ list available so the customer care specialist can promptly assist you.
    •Contact the manufacturer of the hardware component that has an IRQ conflict
    or is not responding for technical support with their product.
Source/Reference

by redxii See Profile

A NIC (Network Interface Card) is defined as an expansion board you insert into a computer so the computer can be connected to a network. Most NICs are designed for a particular type of network, protocol, and media, although some can serve multiple networks.

Downloads for your NIC driver can be found at Mediacom's Software Center

by redxii See Profile
last modified: 2002-03-07 20:59:42