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1.5 Motherboard

If you are using CPUFSB or CPUCool to raise your FSB, you'll need to know your PLL (Phase Locked Loop). Crack open your box, get a flashlight and do the following:

On your mobo, probably near the CPU, you should see an oblong crystal (rounded sides, metallic looking chip) about 1cm long. It will have the number 14.3xxx MHz beside it. Near that chip, you'll see a small IC. Look at it very closely. It should have a manufacturer tag or imprint and a series of numbers or alphanumeric codes -- this is your PLL.

See this graphic for identifying the manufacturer:Here

Now select your PLL in the software you are using. You'll have a range of FSB/PCI bus speeds to select from, depending on what is available for your chip (CPUFSB/CPUCool will tell you what's available). If your PLL is not there, you may not be able to raise your FSB with software until a future update of the software.

by Coriolis3 See Profile edited by FastEddie See Profile
last modified: 2004-02-07 14:16:40

RAID (Redundant Array of Independent Disks) Primer

RAID 0 - Data Striping

RAID 0 allows a number of disk drives to be combined and presented as one large disk. RAID 0 does not provide any data redundancy - if one drive fails, all data is lost.

Access Time Very Good
Transfer Rate Good
Redundancy None
Cost Per Megabyte None
Penalty

Applications Large disk requirements, high performance databases

RAID 1 - Disk Mirroring/Disk Duplexing

RAID 1 mirrors (shadows) one disk drive to another. All data is stored twice on two or more identical disk drives.
When one disk drive fails, all data is immediately available on the other without any impact on the data integrity -performance in degraded mode is also degraded. Performance is gained by splitting of functions. If multiple read requests are pending, the RAID controller will allows reads from different disk drives. If one disk is busy writing the other disk drive can supply read data, at a later time. The RAID controller will update the read drive with data from the already written disk drive.
If each disk drive is connected with a separate SCSI channel, this is called "Disk Duplexing" (additional security and performance). RAID 1 represents a simple
and highly efficient solution for data security and system availability. Use RAID 1 when large volumes of data are not required.

Access Time Very Good
Transfer Rate Good
Redundancy Yes
Cost Per Megabyte 100% or more
Penalty

Applications Small disk capacities that require redundancy

RAID 0 + 1 - Combination of RAID 1 and RAID 0

The idea behind RAID 0+1 is simply based on the combination of RAID 0 (Performance) and RAID 1 (Data Security). RAID 0+1 disk sets offer good performance and data security. Similar as in RAID 0, optimum performance is achieved in highly sequential load situations.
The major draw back is a 100% "Cost Per Megabyte Penalty".

Access Time Very Good
Transfer Rate Good
Redundancy Yes
Cost Per Megabyte 100%
Penalty

Applications Multiuser environments, database servers, file serving, web site hosting.

RAID 3 Data Bit Striping With a Dedicated Parity Drive

The data is striped at a byte/bit level across the disk drives.
Additionally, the controller calculates parity information which is stored on a separate disk drive (aP, bP, ...). Even when one disk drive fails, all data is fully available. The missing data can be recalculated from the data still available and the parity information.
This data calculation can also be used to restore data to a replaced defective disk. Because the data must be presented at the same time, the disk drive spindles must be synchronized for RAID 3 to be effective. This represents a practical implementation problem for RAID 3.
Many RAID controller manufacturers are moving to a RAID 4 solution or using the term RAID 3 merely as a recognized marketing term for high data transfer capability.

Access Time Good
Transfer Rate Very Good
Redundancy Yes
Cost Per Megabyte Varies. 5 drive set = 20%, 6 drive set = 17%, 10 drive set = 10%
Penalty

Applications Imaging, geological, seismological, video

RAID 4 - Data Striping With a Dedicated Parity Drive

RAID 4 works just like RAID 0. The data is striped across disk drives. Additionally, the controller calculates parity information which is stored on a separate disk drive (P1, P2, ...). Even when one disk drive fails, all data is fully available. The missing data can be recalculated from the data still available and the parity information. This data calculation can also be used to restore data to replaced defective disk. RAID 4 offers excellent transfer rates when used with large contiguous blocks of data. When used with with many small data blocks, the parity disk drive becomes a throughput bottle-neck because of it's fixed position.A RAID 4 disk set can only lose one disk from it's RAID set. Losing another disk drive, before a replacement is restored, will lose all data in the RAID set.

Access Time Good
Transfer Rate Very Good
Redundancy Yes
Cost Per Megabyte Varies. 5 drive set = 20%, 6 drive set = 17%, 10 drive set = 10%
Penalty

Applications Imaging, geological, seismological, video

RAID 5 - Data Striping with Striped Parity

The data is striped across disk drives. Unlike RAID 4, the parity data in a RAID 5 set is striped across all disk drives. RAID 5 is designed to handle small data blocks. This makes RAID 5 the level of choice for multitasking, multiuser and database environments.
RAID 5 offers the same level of security as RAID 4: when one disk drive fails, all data is fully available, the missing data is recalculated from the data still available and the parity information. This data calculation can also be used to restore data to replaced defective disks. RAID 5 is particularly suited for systems with medium to large capacity requirements, with their "Cost Per Megabyte Penalty" is relatively low. A RAID 5 disk set can only lose one disk from it's RAID set. Loosing another disk drive, before a replacement is restored, will lose all data in the RAID set.

Access Time Very Good
Transfer Rate Good
Redundancy Yes

Cost Per Megabyte Varies. 5 drive set = 20%, 6 drive set = 17%, 10 drive set = 10%
Penalty

Applications Multiuser environments, database servers, file serving, web site hosting

JBOD - Just a Bunch Of DiskS

An allowance was made by virtually all RAID control manufacturers for adding a single disk inder
the RAID controller that would not be a part of any RAID Set. A "JBOD" disk drive appears to the host as an add-on disk drive. Using JBODs is a convenient way of adding quick storage. If a JBOD disk drive breaks all data is lost.

Access Time Good
Transfer Rate Good
Redundancy No
Cost Per Megabyte None
Penalty

Applications Quick increase in capacity

by FastEddie See Profile
last modified: 2005-03-28 18:29:37

Sorry! Intel are not fans of overclocking so they don't build this ability into their mainboards. Only official bus speeds are supported i.e. 66, 100 and 133Mhz.

by FastEddie See Profile
last modified: 2004-02-07 12:34:23

Here are the steps require to get setfsb working

1. You DISABLE Hyper Threading from bios.

2. Boot into Windows and : My Computer > Properties > Hardware > Device Manager > ACPI........You "pick" Advanced ACPI and you reboot.........Back into Windows > WAIT > Windows found new hardware prompt to reboot > Do so > Back into Windows and.........you are READY to "play".

The problem is this program doesn't support HT CPU's so you must disable it

Roll back : My Computer > Properties > Hardware > Device Manager > ACPI........You click on "roll back" and you reboot......Bios > Enable HT >. ..Back into Windows > WAIT > Windows found new hardware prompt to reboot > Do so > Back into Windows and.........you are READY

You can get setfsb for P4C800
Here

You can get the giveio.sys file
Here

by Exit See Profile edited by FastEddie See Profile
last modified: 2004-02-07 12:38:08

If your using i875/I865 based motherboards you need to be careful when choosing your ram.

If your using an 800fsb cpu so a "C" type P4 you need to remember a few rules...
From Intels white paper.

4 true double sided dimms are fastest...8 IC's on each side of the module.

2 Double sided dimms come second....8 IC's on each side of the module..along with 4 Single sided dimms...4 IC's per side OR all 8 IC's on one side.

SPRINGDALE ALSO HOLDS TRUE TO THIS as long as it has PAT enabled...

Also 99% of all memory IC's are 32MB in size.For TRUE double sided you need 8 IC's per side...16 chips in total on EACH MODULE...Do the math and you will realize what you need.

By Bigtoe

by Exit See Profile edited by FastEddie See Profile
last modified: 2004-02-07 12:28:28

If you want the looks of a DFI Lanparty board without having to buy one check out this guide

by Exit See Profile edited by FastEddie See Profile
last modified: 2004-02-07 12:48:14

Remotely using a computer is nice. You can get a wireless keyboard and mouse, but still you need to get to the computer to power it up, which could be annoying. Therefore a remote power up capability was needed, but remote start solutions for a computer are quite rare and pretty expensive. Since we are hardcore modders, a solution was indeed needed to change that: the doorbell computer remote start.

Read more

by Exit See Profile edited by FastEddie See Profile
last modified: 2004-02-08 13:00:23

Starting a motherboard without a power switch is a very easy thing to do. All you need is your motherboard manual and something made of metal like a screwdriver or coin. In your manual, find the system panel connector diagram. This is the diagram, which shows you how to hook up your front case LED's and switches. (Power and reboot)

Once you have found the diagram look for the pins that are labeled ATX Power Switch or PWR ON. To switch on the computer all you need to do is connect those two pins with your metal object for a second and the system will power on.

Feedback received on this FAQ entry:
  • IF I USE JUMPER AND INSTALL IT WILL THIS WORK AND CAN KEEP IT INSTALLED AS LONG AS COMPUTER IS RUNNING OR THERE IS RISK INVOLVED THANKS AND REGARDS

    2009-12-26 03:11:05

  • Hey thanks for the info. I was wondering about that. I had jumpered the connection and was puzzled when the system started for a short few seconds and then stopped again.

    2007-12-15 20:13:32



by Exit See Profile edited by FastEddie See Profile
last modified: 2004-07-20 10:08:16