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8.0 Installation and Troubleshooting

For first time installations, you want to make sure that you are installing your modem on or after your due date. However, some DSL orders may have sync several days before the due date. No sync means you have no dsl signal or the dsl signal is too weak to maintain a connection with your modem. There are three modems currently being sent out for new customer self-installations depending on your region, the Speedstream 4060, Speedstream 5260/5262, or Westell Wirespeed. On the 4060, no sync is indicated by the blinking green and orange light. On the 5260/5262, no sync is indicated by a blinking green and orange DSL light and the ATM light being off. On the Wirespeed, no sync is indicated by a blinking ready light.

1) Verify with an SBC representative that the correct phone number was set up for DSL. If you have more than one phone line in the home, it is not uncommon for the wrong line to be provisioned.

2) Check your connections. Be sure to plug the modem into the line you ordered DSL on, it will not work on other phone lines. Plug the DSL modem straight into the wall with no 2-line adapter or filter. Make sure all phones, analog modems, fax machines, and any other devices that uses the DSL line is plugged into a filter before it's plugged into a phone jack. Occasionally, you could get a bad 2-line adapter and that's why it is removed. If you can get sync without the 2-line adapter but lose sync with the 2-line adapter on the modem line, then your 2-line adapter is bad. If you have only one jack in the room and need to use the 2-line adapter, call the Installation dept at 877-722-3755 for a filter package replacement.

3) Be sure to use the data cable or phone cord that came with the modem. Sometimes, the regular flat 2-wire phone cord will work fine for your DSL modem and sometimes it won't. These cords can get damaged easily and could work for dial-up and not for DSL. Some people have 100-ft phone cords and sync up just fine. Others can't get DSL to sync up on a 5 ft cord they have used for years. If you plan on using a cord longer than 20 feet, then you might inquire about purchasing a CAT-3 cord with RJ-11 jacks at both ends from a computer store or Radio Shack.

4) Verify that you do not have anything such as a security alarm, doorbell, water meter, or other devices on the DSL line that could interfere with sync. If you do, you may need a tech install to filter all the house wiring and make a dedicated jack for the DSL.

5) Keep the modem at least 1 foot away from any EMI source, such as a CRT monitor, or halogen light.

6) If all the above checks out fine, then you may have a line problem and you need to call the Installation helpdesk at 877-722-3755. After troubleshooting your setup, they will call the provisioning dept to resolve any line issues which may take a few days or a few weeks.

by Ranma See Profile

To understand the differences in the speeds seen by different people, I'll explain the different capping methods used by SBC/ASI. There are a few things to touch on about DSL that will help you understand.

DSL is a frequency based transport, utilizing the frequency ranges that are beyond the POTS(plain old telephone service) ranges. POTS utilizes the human audible range of 0-4khz. DSL, as far as ADSL, starts at 20-100khz for the upload band and then again at 120khz-1.1mhz for the download band. This is important because then longer the copper loop is, the higher frequencies drop out, causing a loss of available bandwidth. Now what this means in layman's terms:

If you're on a long loop, then the DSLAAM/modem connection won't be able to sustain a maximum throughput to keep the line up in sync. To correct this, the DSLAAM is re-programmed to only transmit at a bandwidth that can be sustained reliably.

The 3 major caps are 384k, 768k and open which is 1536k. Keep in mind, that IF you can sustain an open 1536 line, you can probably sustain the higher speed Option 2(1.5-6.0M/384kpbs) line, although in some situations the cost WILL outweigh the gain as far as download speeds.

Now, as far as the newer 192/128 lines. SBC, wanting to provide DSL service to those who were not able to sustain a 384/128 line, came out with a new package. This would let customers have a faster connection than ISDN at a discount price. This was implemented for those customers who were beyond 14kft, which was the point were dramatic decreases were seen. The lines were set up to be automatically raised to the best speed possible, using monitoring software to set the limits.

1) If you are a new customer and are seeing speeds in the 120-150/128 ranges then you can be certain that you fall under the 192/128 plan that will gradually increase your download speed up to the best that can be achieved by your line.

Two notes to read:

.....A) You will start out at 192/128 no matter what your line will handle. In time, usually in 6-10 days, the monitoring software will analyze your line history and raise your speed in increments to the best speed your line will sustain.

.....B) If you were signed up on this package WITHOUT knowing about it then you'll need to contact your ISP and complain very loudly, my advice only!

2) Your line CAN be uncapped to it's best speed, but it won't happen through the normal Tech Support channels! My advice is to seek out one of the techs who frequent the forum, IM them with your DSL number and see what they can do.

Let me repeat, normal tech support will not be able to do anything! Enough said.

3) If you're seeing speeds that you think are low then visit this link and run the Tweak Test to make sure your computer is optimized for a broadband connection. If you still need help then visit this link and click on the above *here* to follow and answer the questions needed to get your DSL line up to par.

OR

4) If you're still seeing speeds below what you think you should be having then I recommend you visit the Tweak forum at this here. Answer the 11 questions and we'll be glad to get you up to speed.

Yes, the above will lead you to the same place eventually. This just makes sure you have followed the steps to make sure your line is optimized to it's best possible outcome depending on your line conditions.

5) If you're an existing customer and have already tweaked for a broadband connection and still sees dramatic decreases in your download speed then by all means, IM one of the techs here on this board who can look into this problem. I won't list them here, but an IM to Flippant or one of the other regular posters will set you in the right direction.

by kmac1 See Profile edited by Flippant See Profile
last modified: 2002-06-05 23:01:03

If you are trying to set up Win XP for PPPoE, but the option you need - "Connect using a broadband connection that requires a user name and password" is grayed out, check out a Microsoft support article that explains just what to do in this instance. It involves a bit of registry editing.
http://support.microsoft.com/default.aspx?scid=kb;en-us;320558

See also: http://support.microsoft.com/default.aspx?scid=kb;en-us;329441.

by A21 See Profile edited by lev See Profile
last modified: 2003-04-02 00:06:46

There's been a lot of talk on this forum about capping, both the old ways and the new. This should help those who have questions about capping.

1) If you are a new customer and are seeing speeds in the 120-150/128 ranges then you can be certain that you fall under the 192/128 plan that will gradually increase your download speed up to the best that can be achieved by your line.

Two notes to read:

A)There's no way any person can adjust your line-speed. It's all done automatically, in fact there's no option available to make such changes without going through your ISP and sending a trouble ticket, and that won't do any good as it will be processed as good because of your package. Now, you can raise a loud voice and demand, but don't be shocked if there's no change without waiting the time limits on the regular upgrade to the line specifics.

B)If you were signed up on this package WITHOUT knowing about it then you'll need to contact your ISP and complain very loudly, my advice only!

2)If you're seeing speeds that you think are low then visit this link and run the Tweak Test to make sure your computer is optimized for a broadband connection. If you still need help then visit this link and click on the above *here* to follow and answer the questions needed to get your DSL line up to par.

OR

2)If you're still seeing speeds below what you think you should be having then I recommend you visit the Tweak forum at this here. Answer the 11 questions and we'll be glad to get you up to speed.

Yes, the above will lead you to the same place eventually. This just makes sure you have followed the steps to make sure your line is optimized to it's best possible outcome depending on your line conditions.

3)If you're an existing customer and have already tweaked for a broadband connection and still sees dramatic decreases in your download speed then by all means, IM one of the techs here on this board who can look into this problem. I won't list them here, but an IM to Flippant or one of the other regular posters will set you in the right direction.

My advice is to go through the FAQ above in this forum. Make sure your line has been totally set-up for DSL( if you need help then ask, in a separate thread), then re-run all that I've listed above
--

by kmac1 See Profile edited by Flippant See Profile
last modified: 2002-04-18 18:14:02

A splitter is the alternative setup for DSL and Voice in the same premise .. it sits at the NID, or entry point of the line to the premise, and splits off the data portion of the signal so that it can be run cleanly through the house.
Generally, splitters support full rate ADSL if available, whereas filters limit top speed to a megabit or so. Recommended if using 4+ telco devices.

A distributed filter, or micro-filter, is a small electronic component that fits between your phone line and a regular voice device, such as a phone, a fax, or any device with a regular modem such as a cable box, alarm system or digital TV.
When DSL (ADSL) is provided over voice lines, all devices in the house except the DSL modem must be connected through filters. The filter protects the devices from high frequency noise. They are low-pass filters.

by redxii See Profile edited by MrFixitCT See Profile
last modified: 2002-09-16 14:38:44

This is a step-by-step way to wire an outside dmarc (teleco box that separates the inside house wiring from the outside teleco wiring). This method needs to used if there's an alarm, or the existing wiring degrades the DSL line.

Home wiring details

Note: This pictorial also shows you how to remove a half-ringer/MTU/maintenance test unit.

Orignally submitted by ADSL Guy.

by Ranma See Profile

Having a dedicated pair to use for DSL doesn't mean that a new wire must be placed. If there is extra pairs available in the existing wire then they can be used. A step-by-step post with pictures can be seen here:

Apartment Install

This method uses a filter placed outside and makes use of one of the extra pairs in the existing wire.
(This method would require a telco/clec technician and is not meant for the general user)
Originally submitted by ADSL Guy.

by Ranma See Profile edited by MrFixitCT See Profile

This type of setup involves any NID that doesn't have a newer test jack. A step-by-step pictorial can be found here:

Old NID setup

Originally submitted by ADSL Guy.

by Ranma See Profile

A step-by-step pictorial can be found here:

Pictorial Guide

Originally submitted by ADSL Guy.

by Ranma See Profile

The solution seems to be an unexpected one. It seems that WinXP somehow manage to change the VPI setting of the internal TI ADSL modem from "0" to "8" and thus after upgraded to WinXP, user will get error 769, "destination can not be reached" error message. Here is the entire text found from Compaq's community discussion page:

"Contrary to what Compaq's own tech support will tell you, the 7585 with the internal TI ADSL modem can be upgraded to Windows XP. I purchased my 7585 from Southwestern Bell - they had a deal going where for $60/month you got a new PC and DSL service. I called the SWB tech support number twice to confirm that the TI modem would work with XP. Both times the response was "it should". Other messages on this community board were from 7585 owners who upgraded to XP only to get error message 768 and gave up. I got this error message after I upgraded. Rather than call the DSL support number I called Compaq and they said XP wouldn't work because there wasn't an XP driver for this modem. WRONG!!!!! I guess they were correct in that the Microsoft hardware compatibility list doesn't list this modem as being XP compatible but IT WORKS. Here is what you need to know (since neither SWBell or Compaq have a clue about how to do this).
After you install XP you need to use "Add/Remove Programs" to uninstall the EnterNet 300 program. (I suppose you can do this before you upgrade to XP, but that isn't what I did so I don't know for sure). Then you need to reinstall the TI DSL Manger. You can do this by running the program WINGRME. You'll click on the rubic cube icon and then you'll see the TI ADSL install program. The goal is to see the icon next to the clock in the sys tray that has the up and down arrow under the horizontal bar. The bar was blue so I knew the modem was in sync, but it still wasn't working. I called the DSL support number back and after a long time on the phone my "case" got elevated to a real tech and he told me to change the VPI setting for the modem card to 0 from the value of 8. AND THEN IT WORKED!!!! It seems incredulous that neither SWBell DSL support or Compaq support could provide a simple document about how to do this. Compaq was really bad since they said it wasn't possible to upgrade to XP. I upgraded because Win 98 was crashing a lot. I think I"m glad I did, but the PC is certainly running slower now - I only have 198 megs of RAM and will probably upgrade to 256 in hopes of speeding it back up. Good luck if you try this."

-posted by wbullard on 2/24/2002 (some spellings edited 4-21-02)

For a discussion of an example, follow this post:

www.dslreports.com/forum/remark...

by UorThem See Profile edited by Flippant See Profile
last modified: 2002-04-29 10:22:46

Given the state of some "technical support" departments at some of the major DSL mass-market providers; it is sometimes useful to identify an ISP related problem specifically. "My e-mail is down" you tell tech support. "Well, no one else is having that problem" or "everything looks good at this end; let's format your drive!"

Sometimes it's a good idea to call tech support with a specific technical report. It helps to cut through much of the BS.

So, you are surfing along, and suddenly your browser complains that it can't find yahoo! Before you call your trusty ISP, poke around to see why the browser can't find yahoo.

You first bring up a dos window. Enter "ping www.yahoo.com" What you get back is "Unknown host www.yahoo.com." So, my computer can't turn a name into an IP address... DNS (Domain Name System) issue. Call tech support now? Nope, not yet! Let's see WHY yahoo is UNKNOWN first.

You search through those papers your ISP sent when you got the account, along with your setup notes and find that your DNS server is 123.123.123.123. OK let's see if it is working!

You bring up a DOS prompt. Type "ping 123.123.123.123" and you get:

Reply from 123.123.123.123: bytes=32 time=110ms TTL=53
Reply from 123.123.123.123: bytes=32 time=110ms TTL=53

OK, so it "seems " to be up, but is it really up?

Let's look into it further.

C:\>nslookup www.dslreports.com 63.209.18.2
Server: jovial.divo.net
Address: 63.209.18.2

Non-authoritative answer:
Name: dslreports.com
Address: 209.123.109.175
Aliases: www.dslreports.com

C:\>

Replace 63.209.18.2 with the DNS server you are testing.

Armed knowledge that your DNS is not working, you now call tech support, and report that their DNS server is down. When will it be fixed? By the way, do you have an alternate DNS server I can use??

You can also verify other services yourself.

For instance, your ISP's Mail server, try TELNET to port 25 (the SMTP port), see if they are up, see what it looks like when they are up so you will know the difference when it is down. Try their port 110 POP3.... 143 IMAP etc...

Check out your primary ISP server-provided services this way the next time you have a problem, or suspect that your service provider is not providing a particular service.

Then call them, and report your findings specifically. You will get better mileage from your broadband connection and better "service" from tech support if you do some of the homework yourself.

Originally submitted by bobrichards

by Ranma See Profile
last modified: 2004-12-08 22:41:53

Client for Microsoft Networks is installed in the Network settings after you install the Enternet 300 software. To get rid of the login screen, you will keep Client for Microsoft Networks, but you will change your primary network logon. Go to Start-Settings-Control Panel-Network, change the "Primary Network Logon" to "Windows Login" or "Microsoft Family Logon", click "Ok", reboot PC.

by Ranma See Profile

If you are configuring your router, you want to set the VPI/VCI setting for 0/35. Some of the older DSL accounts before June 2000, may need a VPI/VCI setting of 8/35 depending on your equipment, especially for the Alcatel modems.

Vz uses 8/35
AT&T uses 0/35

Feedback received on this FAQ entry:
  • i am looking for full forms of vpi and vci..your help regarding this will be appreciated...please write me aman_adsk@yahoo.co.in

    2008-01-26 11:59:18



by Ranma See Profile edited by MrFixitCT See Profile
last modified: 2008-01-26 20:17:46

Check the device manager. Right-click "My Computer", click "Properties", click "Device Manager", expand "Network adapters". If you see the 4060 or Kingston adapter, double-click on the adapter for the device status.

Device Status Messages
1) "Windows stopped responding while attempting to start this device, and therefore will never attempt to start this device again."

Windows encountered a problem loading the driver during boot-up and disabled the device with Agent Skip Driver to prevent boot-up problems. Go to Start-Run, type "ASD", click "Ok", put a check by the 4060 or Kingston adapter, click "Ok", reboot PC.

2) "This device is disabled."

Windows encounter a problem with this driver and disable this device. To reenable the device, click on "Enable Device" or remove the check from "Disable in this hardware profile".

3) "This device is either not present, not working properly, or does not have all the drivers installed. "

For the Kingston adapter, reseat the NIC or uninstall and move to a different PCI slot. If you have tried every PCI slot, the Kingston adapter may be defective.

For the 4060 modem, the USB cable might be loose. Unplug and replug the modem. You may have to move the 4060 to a different USB port.

4) "The drivers for this device are not installed"
"The NDIS.VXD device loader(s) for this device could not load the device driver."

Both messages indicate a failed installation. You can just reinstall the driver. Click on "Driver", click "Reinstall driver", click "Next", click "Search for the best driver", click "Next" until it asks you for a location of the drivers, insert the SBC Express CD or Kingston drivers disk, check "Removable Media", "CD-ROM, and "Floppy Disk", click "Next" until finished, reboot PC. If this doesn't work, reboot PC, press F8 a few times until you get into the start-up menu, choose "Safe Mode", go to device manager, and remove any duplicate 4060 adapters or duplicate Kingston adapters, then reboot PC, and follow the prompts for Add New Hardware Wizard.

by Ranma See Profile

This is usually a PCI IRQ steering issue on the motherboard or a poorly seated NIC.

1) Poorly seated NIC
Check to make sure the NIC is properly seated in the PCI slot. If the card is not in all the way, carefully bend the tab where you screw the card up about 20-30 degrees. Reseat the card, paying close attention to how far it goes down. You want the NIC to seat lower in the slot. Sometimes the NIC manufacturer gets metal plates that were stamped out incorrectly and get missed in quality checks.

2) Changing your NIC to a different brand or model
Switching out the NIC for another brand or model may solve the download problems. Replacing a Kingston KNE111TX for a KNE110TX or for even a completely different brand of NIC such as a Linksys or 3com has helped many people solve their download problems. Some of the cheaper NICs do not seem to like sharing an IRQ with other PCI devices and will result in a PCI IRQ steering problem. The Kingston KNE111TX seems to have this problem quite a bit, but replacing it with a KNE110TX or another brand will fix this problem. If changing your NIC to a different brand didn't work, the PCI IRQ steering issue could be motherboard or BIOS related.

3) PCI IRQ steering issue
Go into the BIOS and check the IRQ assigned to the slot.
If the PCI slot you are using is sharing an IRQ with another device, then move the NIC to a slot that is not sharing an IRQ with another device. Then install it in each slot and try and download. If that does not work, take out any unneeded PCI cards, soundcards, 56 modem PCI card, an extra NIC, etc, and try the last few slots, if it's working, you can add the devices back one by one.

Here are threads to read on this issue with the various solutions that worked:

Changing NIC to a different brand or model.
http://www.dslreports.com/forum/remark,758582;root=ilec,am;mode=flat
http://www.dslreports.com/forum/remark,1289336;root=ilec,swbell;mode=flat
http://www.dslreports.com/forum/remark,1151927;root=ilec,pcb;mode=flat
http://www.dslreports.com/forum/remark,1297608;root=ilec,swbell;mode=flat

Switching to a different PCI slot that did not share an IRQ.
http://www.dslreports.com/forum/remark,899410;root=ilec,swbell;mode=flat
http://www.dslreports.com/forum/remark,436136;root=ilec,swbell;mode=flat
http://www.dslreports.com/forum/remark,685564;root=ilec,swbell;mode=flat
http://www.dslreports.com/forum/remark,689585;root=ilec,swbell;mode=flat
http://www.dslreports.com/forum/remark,497402;root=ilec,swbell;mode=flat

4} Bad Modem
We now have a documented case where the cause of this problem was the DSL modem itself. This makes for a more difficult troubleshoot as another modem is needed to check all possible sources of the problem. However, it is pretty rare for the modem to be bad. This also reinforces the notion that the problem is on the customer side.

Bad Modem
»Can browse, but not D/L , I need tech help please!

Originally submitted by ADSL Guy & Flippant

by Ranma See Profile edited by Flippant See Profile
last modified: 2004-02-18 19:15:29

Always make sure he checks sync readings with his Sunrise meter at:

* the MPOE (Also known as the NID)

* the wall jack where the cable from the modem plugs in

* and you should always request the sync readings ( max, fast, margin,attenuation and capacity) at the MPOE and the DSL modem jack and write them down.

These readings should be consistent throughout the process and insures that the best possible DSL sync signal is delivered to the modem, and eliminates bad wiring as a culprit.

At the MPOE he should hold the sync for at least three minutes, looking to see if his alarm light (dropped sync) comes on.

Originally submitted by drainbamage

by Ranma See Profile edited by Flippant See Profile
last modified: 2004-06-12 11:55:46

Things that I have found to create wideband RF Interference (In order of occurrences):

Preface: There are many, many things that cause interference, and if you find the (suspected cause) of the problem, use some tact! There are many reasons for devices becoming unwanted receivers, and both sides may be "at fault". Both sides will have to work for a successful completion of the problem. Don't approach this with an "Attitude" or you'll have an Attitude all by yourself!

1. Dimmers... There are so many, with each company making them as inexpensive as possible, they reduce or remove the RFI filters to keep costs down, profits up. You can usually use a portable AM radio tuned to the upper band edge at an unoccupied station to be used as an RFI sniffer. It will sound like a raspy buzzing. Work around: Unplug it and replace with one that has better RFI suppression (Good Luck!)

2. Power transformers (Com ED)
Use the same RFI Sniffing procedure (Car or walkaround), then call and complain.

3. Electric devices (irons, frypans, heat lamps, etc). The noise they generate as they turn on, turn off, is considerable. AM radio (Powered off AC) will lead you right to it. Christmas light flashers will do same thing to a lesser extent.

4. Transmissions (Ham, CB, Cellphone, etc.) These are harder to find. Watch the modulation characteristics:

Is it a solid pattern, a repeating pattern on/off, or can you determine that something is modulating the interference?

A AM radio or cheap telephone may give you insight to the problem, but again, maybe not. Here is some generalizations that is guaranteed to get me in trouble for posting:

IF the interference IS or IS NOT detectable by a cheap phone, or AM radio, turn on the TV (not cable) to Channel 5 and then Channel 2. IF the same is visible on both 5 and 2 (sometimes CH 5 or 2 may be stronger), THEN it is a good chance it is CB radio. Transmissions will be intermittent in nature, and if you can detect it with a cheap phone or AM radio, you will hear the audio transmitted. 10-4 Good Buddy!

IF the interference is rapid in ON/OFF sequence (1/4 second pulses or 6-8 second bursts), followed by pauses of 1 to 3 minutes, AND there is no apparent modulation, THEN it is a good chance it is a paging system, or MORSE CODE, and origin is from a local ham, of paging company. Find by looking for antennas. Approach them without an attitude, and you'll get far.

IF the interference is random, with no modulation visible or audible in the interference, it could be many things, pagers, ham transmissions.

Take your time, be polite, and good luck.

Feedback received on this FAQ entry:
  • Devices with a resistive load, like heating devices, do not generate noticeable interference. Devices that have an inductive load, like motors, do cause radio interference. I've noticed that refrigerators, central air furnaces and washing machines give off interference. Some modern UPS systems give off a bit of radio interference. If you're trying to find the source of the interference with basic DSL, you must use an AM radio frequency less than 1104 kHz. It's probably best to start at the bottom of the radio dial (lowest frequency), and work your way up. If your modem comes with a signal to noise ratio graph or a bit loading graph interface, set the AM radio dial to the bin with the lowest signal to noise ratio. Each bin is 4.3125 kHz. So if you have no signal at bin 188, you would multiply that bin number by 4.3125 kHz to get the frequency, which is 810.75 kHz. This method will help you direct your attention to the exact frequency of the interference. This type of graph is available in the 2Wire modem's Management Diagnostic Console (gateway.2wire.net/xslt?PAGE=J42&THISPAGE=A02_POST&NEXTPAGE=J42).

    2010-03-26 14:49:24 (DiamondSky See Profile)

  • In the HDTV (ATSC) all-digital over the air TV world we are heading toward in 2009, Channel 2 and Channel 5 will no longer be suitable suggestions for interference troubleshooting. Using any TV channel for interference troubleshooting may become impossible if/when the FCC potentially approves the usage of frequency "white space" for broadband. It would be good to archive these troubleshooting methods in the future though, just for posterity. These older technologies interference patterns (period and duration) may still be recognizable with alternative (cheap spectrum analyzers?) or legacy equipment (AM/HAM) in the future.

    2007-09-23 21:48:06 (justbits See Profile)



by Jan Janowski See Profile edited by Flippant See Profile
last modified: 2007-09-24 08:23:12

A beginning How-To can be found HERE.

This will help most users who want to set up their static configuration. Advanced users should look to the Hardware specific forums for configuration help.

by kmac1 See Profile
last modified: 2002-11-27 08:49:12

For screenshots of the following steps, go to http://support.sbcglobal.net/article.php?item=21&os=winxp
    •Go to Start > Control Panel
    •(Make sure you are viewing the Classic View. If insteadyou are in Category View, select Switch to Classic View from the upper-left of the window.) Double click on Network Connections
    •Under the Network Tasks click on Create a new connection
    •The New Connection Wizard opens; click Next
    •Click on Connect to the Internet and click Next
    •Click on Setup my connection manually and click Next
    •Click on Connect using a broadband connection that requires a user name and apssword and click Next
    is the option you need grayed out? see this for help
    •Type a name for the connection (SBC Yahoo, for example) and click Next
    •Type in your full SBC e-mail address (for example, you@sbcglobal.net) in User Name box; account password you picked during setup in the next two boxes; make sure the first two check boxes (Use for anyone and Make default) are checked; click Next
    •If you want a shortcut on your desktop, check that box; click Finish
    •In the Network Connections window, select the connection you just created. Then click Change settings of this connection from Network Tasks.
    •On the Networking tab, select Internet Protocol (TCP/IP) and click Properties.
    Note: The box beside File and Printer Sharing for Microsoft Networks should be unchecked.
    •On theInternet Protocal (TCP/IP) Properties screen, make sure the radio buttons for Obtain an IP address automatically and Obtain DNS server address automatically are both selected. Click OK and OK again.


by MrFixitCT See Profile edited by A21 See Profile
last modified: 2004-03-21 17:31:17

1. Windows XP and Mac OS X does not require any software
2. Windows 95,98,ME,NT,2000 and Mac OS 7,8,9.x all require Enternet300 at least, but now prefer the connection manager too
3. Windows 3.x, Linux, Lindows, DOS, or any other version of OS is not supported. Phone support is not very perceptive to these OSes, they are technically supposed to answer your questions but not try to walk you through any specifics. (ie. Configuring TCP/IP stacks, configuring mail clients, etc.)

Email clients include:
Microsoft Outlook Express and now MS Outlook 98 and above is supported BY PHONE SUPPORT.

Netscape 4.7x email is now supported as well.

Browsers:
IE6 and back to 5, Netscape 4.7x to 6 and the new SBC/Yahoo! Browser

by CCCMTech See Profile edited by kmac1 See Profile
last modified: 2003-01-29 13:08:44

This used to be for everyone but is now for loops 12,000 ft and further. Basically anyone on a plan above the "basic up to 384" plan need not apply.

If you have any package above the basic plan, your less than 12000 ft and should have "speeds out of the box".

SBC will monitor the line and increase the speed to the highest possible that can achieved. This process, also called ramp-up, will be done for 10 days.

If you have any further questions please ask one of the Official SBC Techs.

by CCCMTech See Profile edited by kmac1 See Profile
last modified: 2003-10-23 14:25:06

To understand how DSL overhead works, and why your speed tests test where they do, relative to the advertised sync rate, check out this FAQ on DSL overhead.

by pflog See Profile edited by MrFixitCT See Profile
last modified: 2006-02-28 15:51:28

*This will not work on the legacy single static accounts from before 2000. ATTIS policy does not allow for r-DNS (PTR) records on basic single static accounts.*

You have two ways to contact the group that establishes the Reverse DNS records.

The preferred method is to submit the online form found here: »attis-dns.sbcglobal.net/

Or call into DSL Provisioning at 800-833-2120 Options 1 and they should be able to get this set up for you.

The online form can only be reached from an ATTIS IP, if you are not on an ATTIS IP you will be taken to the public page.

by Matthew See Profile edited by lev See Profile
last modified: 2010-06-30 22:24:20

Yes. There are two SNTP v4 time servers and located at:

ntp1.sbcglobal.net --- 68.94.156.17
ntp2.sbcglobal.net --- 68.94.157.2

by d_l See Profile

In general you should allow the DNS server to be obtained when you get an IP. If you feel you need to enter values, these are recommended.

Updated December 2006 for the entire AT&T Network

68.94.156.1 Primary
68.94.157.1 Secondary

If you suspect DNS look up latency using these or other DNS servers, you can measure the lookup latency by using ns_bench: »SBC DSL FAQ »How do I test DNS lookup latency with ns_bench?.

by Flippant See Profile edited by d_l See Profile
last modified: 2009-04-01 10:30:03

If you are connected to a C.O. (Central Office) rather than an RT (remote terminal) and you start DSL service at or upgrade your speed plan to the following speeds:

• Basic - 768/384
• Express - 1536/384
• Pro - 3008/512,

you will be on a 10-day (all days, not just business days) long speed ramp. The initial starting speeds for these speed ramps, respectively, are as follows: 224/128, 384/384, and 1984/512. The intent of the ramp is to provide a stable DSL sync speed on your line from the start of service and simultaneously test the quality of your line without any disruption of your DSL service. The line is tested and speed is increased as fast as possible within the stricture of insuring uninterrupted service. This speed ramp is NOT a scam nor is it a capped scam by AT&T. See: »[General] A note about ramp up:

The automated speed ramp requires that the modem be kept on 24/7 to complete the speed ramp in the shortest time possible. Any modem outages will simply delay the testing process if the modem happens to be off when the system has scheduled a check on your line. The speed ramp has a 30-day window to complete the 10 days of testing. Typically the speed ramp will jump to the next speed step after three to five days of testing after the initial sync event. The better the line conditions, the faster the speed steps occur. The final speed step, full sync speeds, usually will take place six to ten days after the start.

The Elite speed plan, 6016/768, doesn't have a speed ramp; however, sometimes an order for Elite may be placed on a slower plan if the line isn't distance qualified for Elite. If the line's maxrate speed can be shown to exceed that needed to handle Elite, then the service speed can be moved up to Elite following the speed ramp.

Following the full 10-days of the speed ramp, if your sync speed as reported by your modem (this is NOT the same as throughput speed as reported by a speed test) isn't at the maximum speed you purchased, first post a thread in the appropriate AT&T regional forum with your modem stats and sync speeds. The reason for doing this first is that the speed ramp may have failed due to an inside wiring problem at your residence. You must correct any such problems before your sync speed can be manually raised by a technician in the AT&T Direct forum. If you have a 5100b, 4100, or 4100b Speedstream modem or a Motorola 2210 modem, posting the maxrate results and charts from the DMT tool can help diagnose the cause of the ramp failure: »SBC DSL FAQ »How can I check for the maximum attainable sync speeds with a 5100b/4100 modem?. There are also maxrates and charts reported in the 2Wire modems. For older 2wires (pre-1070b versions), the maxrate can be found at this link: »homeportal/management/link_statistics.html . For 1070b 2Wires and newer versions, this link: »gateway.2wire.net/xslt?PAGE=J42 has the maxrate stats and charts.

If you do not want to correct your inside wiring problems on your own, AT&T will be only too happy to charge you for the fix.

Once you have determined that the failure wasn't caused by an inside wiring problem, then you should post a Trouble thread in AT&T Direct or call AT&T phone support. The Pro speed ramp is especially sensitive to line conditions and frequently will fail on the 1984 speed when the line has much higher maxrate capabilities as shown by your modem's maxrate statistics.

If your sync speeds have reached the maximum at the end of your speed ramp, but your throughput speed tests are at 55% or less of your sync speeds, then you have another problem, possibly an aggregation router profile mismatch. Post in your regional forum for help with this problem.

by d_l See Profile
last modified: 2009-04-07 22:33:13