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Comments on news posted 2011-12-16 16:22:34: Sprint and AT&T spent this week explaining just how heavily they use the controversial CarrierIQ rootkit to track phone performance. According to Sprint, the company uses the software on 26 million devices, but only collects data from about about 1. ..

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FFH5
Premium
join:2002-03-03
Tavistock NJ
kudos:5

1 recommendation

End of CarrierIQ ??

If other carriers follow Sprint's actions, CarrierIQ is toast as a company. They are done.

Cogdis

join:2007-03-26
Floral Park, NY
Good.


FFH5
Premium
join:2002-03-03
Tavistock NJ
kudos:5

And it isn't a rootkit

This dslreports poster points out how CarrierIQ software isn't a rootkit. But the use of that term helps people to demonize the software:
»Rootkit? Really?


Case4Privacy

@comcast.net

All phones are tracked no matter who made it or whats on it

There really is no clean phone, the problem is the way the networks themselves function. If every tower on the network looked for every phone getting a call there wouldn't be enough bandwidth, so they track every phone real-time to see which towers have the best signal quality to send you your call, data, or texts.

As long as your phone is connected to the network, your phones microphone, camera, GPS, and it's contents are available to anyone who wants them. Worse yet your phone is nothing more than an open book to someone with a laptop and an antenna.

We've spent years researching the problem and have compiled a series of news reports that clearly lay out the problem, including the fact that turning your phone off doesn't cut it said at the end of the clips by ABC, FOX, Local network affiliates.

See for yourself: www.Thecaseforprivacy.com/blogs/news

ke4pym
Premium
join:2004-07-24
Charlotte, NC

Hopefully just the start

Good job, Sprint!


dks7

join:2004-05-31
Omak, WA

1 recommendation

reply to Case4Privacy

Re: All phones are tracked no matter who made it or whats on it

Exactly, get your overpriced made in China government pre-approved tracking device here!

Don't own a cell and never will.


davoice

join:2000-08-12
Saxapahaw, NC
reply to FFH5

Re: End of CarrierIQ ??

Umm... they're not toast. You forget, what has been de-activated can be re-activated. Sprint is not saying it's *removing* CarrierIQ. It's just saying it has turned it off.

Thus there is no reason they can't turn it back on later. And nothing stopping them from continuing to install the software on their phones but just leave it turned off until some later date.

}Davoice


FFH5
Premium
join:2002-03-03
Tavistock NJ
kudos:5
said by davoice:

Umm... they're not toast. You forget, what has been de-activated can be re-activated. Sprint is not saying it's *removing* CarrierIQ. It's just saying it has turned it off.

Sprint says it is removing the software and not just turning it off.

»www.geek.com/articles/mobile/spr ··· 0111216/

Sprint has ordered that all of their hardware partners remove the Carrier IQ software from Sprint devices as soon as possible.

Sources at HTC have told us that, as a result of the lawsuits targeting Carrier IQ, Sprint, and other CIQ-using OEMs, Sprint has asked all of their partners to get rid of Carrier IQ. Starting with the high-volume and high-profile devices on the network, each of the OEM’s has been asked to quickly release binaries that do not contain Carrier IQ so that over-the-air updates can be pushed to those devices as quickly as possible. The eventual plan is to remove Carrier IQ from all of the devices on Sprint’s network.


--
The nine most terrifying words in the English language are, I'm from the government and I'm here to help.
»www.politico.com/rss/2012-electi ··· blog.xml


erik2250

join:2007-08-02
Etobicoke, ON

Job well done

The company/person who looked into this and brought CarrierIQ to the public's attention is a hero!

ISurfTooMuch

join:2007-04-23
Tuscaloosa, AL
That would be Trevor Eckhart.

And the reason that name is so fresh in my mind is because of a CNN opinion piece about SOPA. The author mentions how Carrier IQ initially threatened Eckhart, accusing of copyright infringement for posting information that was publicly available on the Carrier IQ Web site. The author's point was that, under SOPA, it would have been very easy for Carrier IQ to have either had this information quickly taken down or or to have had his site blacklisted. That would have stopped his disclosure dead in its tracks, and we likely wouldn't be discussing this now.

In case you're interested, here's the link:

»www.cnn.com/2011/12/14/opinion/s ··· t=hp_bn9


Ianto Jones

join:2011-01-01
Merchantville, NJ
reply to Case4Privacy

Re: All phones are tracked no matter who made it or whats on it

So then what's the solution? Based on what you said, I can see why something is needed.... but is there no way to balance functionality of how things work with privacy concerns?

ISurfTooMuch

join:2007-04-23
Tuscaloosa, AL
I think the solution is to have strong data privacy laws that aren't full of loopholes. And those should also have to apply to each and every government agency from the local cops to the FBI, CIA, and NSA.

The problem is that all the opponents of such a law are very well-connected. A real privacy law would only benefit the general public, and we all know how well politicians are at playing many people off against each other. So many people are so caught up in the petty partisan wedge issues that they never look at the things that really matter, and the politicians like it that way.


n2jtx

join:2001-01-13
Glen Head, NY

I Believe Sprint When They Say They Do Not Monitor

The carrier also clarified that Carrier IQ was not used for any form of targeted advertising or profiling of customers. The software's sole purpose was to report network deficiencies and allow Sprint to improve its network and service for its customers.
Considering how pathetic their 3G performance has been lately, I truly believe them when they say there were not using CarrierIQ extensively. If they were using it, perhaps their network would be running better. (sarcasm)
--
I support the right to keep and arm bears.

Chubbysumo

join:2009-12-01
Superior, WI
Reviews:
·Charter

1 recommendation

reply to FFH5

Re: And it isn't a rootkit

Here is he definition of a "rootkit", you tell me if it meets this"
Rootkit - A rootkit is software that enables continued privileged access to a computer while actively hiding its presence from administrators by subverting standard operating system functionality or other applications.


Cheese
Premium
join:2003-10-26
Naples, FL
kudos:1
said by Chubbysumo:

Here is he definition of a "rootkit", you tell me if it meets this"
Rootkit - A rootkit is software that enables continued privileged access to a computer while actively hiding its presence from administrators by subverting standard operating system functionality or other applications.

No, it doesn't

old_wiz_60

join:2005-06-03
Bedford, MA

but...but...

what about the government spooks who get the info? what will they do? secretly turn it back on?

erik2250

join:2007-08-02
Etobicoke, ON
reply to ISurfTooMuch

Re: Job well done

Thanks for the link!


KrK
Heavy Artillery For The Little Guy
Premium
join:2000-01-17
Tulsa, OK

1 recommendation

reply to FFH5

Re: End of CarrierIQ ??

They'll just change the TOS and people will be "opting in" for CarrierIQ. And then it will be turned back on.

I think the threat CarrierIQ posed was really overblown, but nonetheless I don't agree with this stuff installed on phones that you as the user cannot disable or turn off at will.
--
"Fascism should more properly be called corporatism because it is the merger of state and corporate power." -- Benito Mussolini


dvd536
as Mr. Pink as they come
Premium
join:2001-04-27
Phoenix, AZ
kudos:4

Root

can this be removed if device is rooted?

nnaarrnn

join:2004-09-30
Nitro, WV
Yes


cmatties
Only the strong will survive. HAHA

join:2005-03-04
Green Springs, OH
reply to dvd536
to an extent. you will need to flash your phone with a custom rom. and still then it is not fully removed do to the fact it is embedded on the rom chip it self. thats my understanding from a friend who has made custom rom's
--
»www.speedtest.net/result/3363250 ··· 5078.png
»www.speedtest.net/result/1631437 ··· 7405.png

bladec594

join:2007-09-24
Alpharetta, GA
reply to Cheese

Re: And it isn't a rootkit

Agree, not a rootkit. Some reporters just use that term to incite the minions and generate clicks. Just as slimey as mainstream media is portrayed to be...


mix

join:2002-03-19
Utica, MI
reply to n2jtx

Re: I Believe Sprint When They Say They Do Not Monitor

Considering the level of incompetency at Sprint, I'd surmise they didn't even put two and two together that they could use this software to monitor their (lack of) network performance and role out capacity and bandwidth upgrades to certain towers.


jseymour

join:2009-12-11
Waterford, MI

1 recommendation

Who Owns The Phone?

It seems to me that carriers want to own the phone when it suits them, and the customer to own the phone when it does not. E.g.: I have to pay for the phone, but I can't take it to whatever network I want (after any subsidizing contract is up) or put it on another network when I can't get to theirs. The carrier believes it has the right to put spyware on the phone or determine what electronic payments system can be installed upon it, but if it breaks I'm the one who has to pay to replace it.

This is simply blatantly wrong, in my view. You either own the phone or you do not. If you own the phone, the most the carrier ought to have the right to do is enforce technical standards that ensure compatibility with their network. Period. Exception is subsidized phones, while the subsidizing contract is still in force, of course. Then you're obliged to stay on their network until the contract is up or you pay the ETF. But that should be the limit of their control over your phone. If the carrier owns the phone then you're at their mercy, but it's also on their dime for repairs and replacements.

Carriers ought not to be able to have it both ways.


KrK
Heavy Artillery For The Little Guy
Premium
join:2000-01-17
Tulsa, OK
Exactly. If you own your phone, or at the end of your subsidy, the phone should be unlocked and and privileges given to full (Like rooting). The user shouldn't be the one who has to try and find custom roms, or manually root or jailbreak the phone.

As you say: They want "ownership" control and rights, but none of the liability or responsibility. IE they control it and use it how they see fit, however you pay for it and are responsible for it should it break or need replacement.

It's completely messed up.
--
"Fascism should more properly be called corporatism because it is the merger of state and corporate power." -- Benito Mussolini


SrsBsns

join:2001-08-30
Oklahoma City, OK

Still here Sprint!

So if what they say is true then why am I still seeing this on the Sprint Galaxy S2?



michieru
Premium
join:2009-07-25
Miami, FL
reply to Cheese

Re: And it isn't a rootkit

The correct term is spyware

talz13

join:2006-03-15
Avon, OH
reply to SrsBsns

Re: Still here Sprint!

In an attempt to distance themselves from the increasingly volatile Carrier IQ situation, weve been told that Sprint has ordered that all of their hardware partners remove the Carrier IQ software from Sprint devices as soon as possible.

Sounds like you need a software update from the vendor to remove the software.


SrsBsns

join:2001-08-30
Oklahoma City, OK
said by talz13:

In an attempt to distance themselves from the increasingly volatile Carrier IQ situation, weve been told that Sprint has ordered that all of their hardware partners remove the Carrier IQ software from Sprint devices as soon as possible.

Sounds like you need a software update from the vendor to remove the software.

My phone was just updated to 2.3.6 this week and its still there.

talz13

join:2006-03-15
Avon, OH
I'd say you still have at least a couple weeks before Samsung gets around to releasing an update with this change in it. The news article was just from yesterday, and I'm sure that was just the beginning of the process.