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Comments on news posted 2012-03-20 16:14:57: Router lockups have been a problem for me ever since I got my first 802.11G Router in 2004. ..

page: 1 · 2 · 3 · 4 · next

bdnhsv

join:2012-01-20
Huntsville, AL

Great article

That's a great article. I would also recommend ClearOS to anyone researching this sort of thing. I've been using it for a long time now and it has a lot of useful features.



woody7
Premium
join:2000-10-13
Torrance, CA

1 recommendation

Nice Read

I have been using "nix" solutions for years. been experimenting, and by no means expert, but getting comfortable. I wish this article had been around when I started. I like Devil linux also
--
BlooMe


majortom1029

join:2006-10-19
Lindenhurst, NY
kudos:1

pfsense and untangle

We use pfsense on our network here at work. we had to use it ebcause we have a 100/100 network and couldnt find a decently priced router that we could afford that can handle those speeds with 50 - 100 users all using it.

we have it running on a spare server (we had it running on a p4 desktop which was also able to handle the speeds) . IT runs beutifully.

We use untangle as our wireless network router and it hosts the captive portal. Its very user friendly but some of the more advanced features have to be paid for.

Software firewalls are great BUT keep in mind desktop pc's usually use more power then hardware routers.



delusion ftl

@comcast.net
reply to bdnhsv

Re: Great article

Plus one to clear OS. Great for home DIY and small business users.



45612019

join:2004-02-05
New York, NY

1 recommendation

What is this guy talking about?

I've had an Asus RT-N16 for years now and I'm a hardcore gamer. I push terabytes of traffic every month. I just checked and its uptime is 183 days. It's only an $80 router and it seems to be getting the job done just fine.

Just get one of these these things, toss DD-WRT on it, and call it a day.

Going to the effort of building your own router and configuring a Linux install is rather ridiculous for the home user. I am the definition of a power user and this stock router with DD-WRT has served me just fine.



JigglyWiggly

join:2009-07-12
Pleasanton, CA
reply to majortom1029

Re: pfsense and untangle

I use pfsense it is the best thing ever. I have multiple internet connections, load balancing them, and failover to a DSL line and games go throught the DSL line.

So customizable and it's not even too hard to use!

untangle sucks do not use it. needs insane machine to run, slow, and not very configurable through the GUI.

ALso I am a home user, no IT experience or any of that crap. I actually dunt get the hype with Cisco when pfsense does everything and more. Vlans, vpn, all that stuff.



Quake110
Premium
join:2003-12-20
Ottawa, ON

1 recommendation

Not worth it

I do not really see the purpose of having a Pentium 4 router for home internet connections. They're power hungry plus the cpu usage will be minimal at best, I mean, how many active torrents will someone have at once?

An ASUS RT-N16 router with the Tomato or DD-WRT firmware is more than enough in my opinion, your electricity bill will thank you.



MxxCon

join:1999-11-19
Brooklyn, NY

1 recommendation

reply to 45612019

Re: What is this guy talking about?

said by 45612019:

I am the definition of a power user and this stock router with DD-WRT has served me just fine.

that definition created by you.
Do you use ipsec point to point vpn tunnel? or 1:1 nat? how about outbound firewalling rules? captive portal? ldap authentication?
how many users are on your network? how big is your states table? how many concurrent connections do you have right now?

just because RT-N16+ddwrt is enough FOR YOU, doesn't mean everybody should be using it.
--
[Sig removed by Administrator: signature can not exceed 20GB]


cowboyro
Premium
join:2000-10-11
Shelton, CT

2 recommendations

In the end it's cheaper to just buy a good router

The computer and distro may be free, but the electricity it uses isn't.
Even with only 50W used (old computer, minimal fans, no hard drive) it add up to 438kWh/yr. At the typical $0.11/kWh that's some $50/year - or up to $150/yr in expensive places.
It may be way cheaper in the long run to buy a quality router - or just install a custom firmware.

Oddly I've never experienced locking issues...



142 days puts it right at the snowstorm we had in October.

Angrychair

join:2000-09-20
Jacksonville, FL
Reviews:
·Comcast

1 recommendation

The problem

Good article. Have had friends who ran low end linux machines as routers since the 90's. My problem with these is the power consumption.

Even the lowest end of normal computers tend to draw a significant amount of power more than appliance routers do. (~50+ watts for a headless linux machine compared to ~5 watts for an appliance)

Not to even mention your linux machine being used as a router is a target, unlike an appliance router.

A compromised linux machine is a real problem, so it just seems like a lot more admin work and power use than most people would want in the long run.



ropeguru
Premium
join:2001-01-25
Mechanicsville, VA

Great to see ASG listed

I use Astaro at home as I am a power user that runs my own web site and email server. I like having the virus scanning and spam filtering built in and the ability to lock down my network from inside out and outside in.

I will agree that it can be daunting, but for free and being able to learn a REAL firewall it is great.

BTW - You could run it on its own VM and not have to have dedicated hardware. I have done this and it works just fine.



odog
Cable Centric Vendor Biased
Premium,VIP
join:2001-08-05
Atlanta, GA
kudos:14
Reviews:
·Comcast
reply to Quake110

Re: Not worth it

said by Quake110:

I do not really see the purpose of having a Pentium 4 router for home internet connections. They're power hungry plus the cpu usage will be minimal at best, I mean, how many active torrents will someone have at once?

An ASUS RT-N16 router with the Tomato or DD-WRT firmware is more than enough in my opinion, your electricity bill will thank you.

good point... I had no idea how much money I was spending until I switched back from a monowall box to a Netgear WNDR3700.... it was costing me about $10 a month to power it!


Simba7
I Void Warranties

join:2003-03-24
Billings, MT

My Router

I have a Dual Pentium III @ 1GHz with 1GB of RAM and a 18GB Hard Drive. I am thinking of shoving in 4GB of RAM and caching the entire DNS root servers.

..I also have 2x Quad Port Sun Gigaswift cards, 2x Digital DE504's, a dual port Compaq NC3131, an old SMC 8432BTA 10BT/AUI/BNC card, and an Allied Telesyn AT-2560FX.. See below (Router).

This sucker handles DNS, DHCP, VPN, IPTables, Dansguardian, and a handful of other services. It runs Gentoo (at the moment) and runs rather well.
--
Bresnan 30M/5M | CenturyLink 5M/896K
MyWS[PnmIIX3@3.3G,8G RAM,500G+1.5T+2T HDDs,Win7]
WifeWS[A64@2G,2G RAM,120G HDD,Win7]
Router[2xP3@1G,1G RAM,18G HDD,Allied Telesyn AT2560FX,2xDigital QP DE504,Compaq DP NC3131,2xSun QP GigaSwift, SMC 8432BTA, Gentoo]



KrK
Heavy Artillery For The Little Guy
Premium
join:2000-01-17
Tulsa, OK

It's a great article

Good job.

And obviously this is if you need something more powerful or configurable then a regular stock home router.

I've had an excellent Netgear WNDR3700v2 for over a year and it's been excellent, (I've never had a router lockup) but my requirements are mundane and so that's fine.

Thumbs up this article!
--
"Fascism should more properly be called corporatism because it is the merger of state and corporate power." -- Benito Mussolini



pnh102
Reptiles Are Cuddly And Pretty
Premium
join:2002-05-02
Mount Airy, MD

pfSense

I've used pfSense for quite some time and it is great. One odd thing I wonder though... every time I've run in on an AMD-based CPU, weird things happen, like stuff doesn't work, I get random lockups, etc.

But when I run it on Intel-based CPUs, things work fine.

Now granted, it could be that all my older AMD-based setups are junk, but I was wondering if anyone else had similar problems.
--
"Net Neutrality" zealots - the people you can thank for your capped Internet service.


BiggA

join:2005-11-23
EARTH
reply to Quake110

Re: Not worth it

Exactly. This stuff is awesome, but you need something like a low-power Mini-ITX machine or a laptop to run it on.



joebarnhart
Paxio evangelist

join:2005-12-15
Santa Clara, CA

pfSense for me

I also have to recommend pfSense for those whose needs are not well met by off-the-shelf routers. I run it on platforms as small as the Alix boards from PCEngines to Core2 Duo based systems. Nothing I've used has anywhere near the capability of pfSense. It is truly enterprise-class software available for free.



Vchat20
Landing is the REAL challenge
Premium
join:2003-09-16
Columbus, OH

Smoothwall

When I originally toyed around with the idea of x86 router distros, I settled on smoothwall and loved it. The user mods/addons really made it stand out to say the least. And I'd probably go back to it as well if I jumped on that bandwagon again.

Original setup was an old Compaq machine with a K6-2 processor, 256MB ram if memory serves, and 15GB disk drive. Red interface was a cable modem with a 768/128 connection and green was fed to two DD-WRT'd routers set up as switch+AP boxes. Adding in user addons for tight squid caching control, detailed QoS with virtually unlimited rules, and web filtering for specific family members made it worthwhile. Not to mention little novelties like playing particular tunes out the PC speaker for power up/power down notifications. Nothing like playing the Adam's Family theme over the PC speaker when the router came back up after a reboot. :P

Next run through playing with an x86 based router I'll probably hit pfSense first, but Smoothwall is always going to have that attraction for me.
--
I swear, some people should have pace-makers installed to free up the resources. Breathing and heart beat taxes their whole system, all of their brain cells wasted on life support.-two bit brains, and the second bit is wasted on parity! ~head_spaz


GraysonPeddi
Grayson Peddie

join:2010-06-28
Tallahassee, FL

I'm using plain iptables i my Debian server.

And I'm using hostapd for wireless networking.

I wonder if I could integrate iptables with anti-virus for unified threat management?

I am running Debian Sid+Experimental with some things like file server, DNS server, web/mail server, Asterisk PBX, and any other things that I can think of .
--
Phone: Yealink SIP-T22P + CSipSimple in Optimus V
Phone System: Asterisk 10.1; Server: Debian Sid+Exp

I'm in heaven with VoIP except for 3G wireless.



fifty nine

join:2002-09-25
Sussex, NJ
kudos:2
reply to cowboyro

Re: In the end it's cheaper to just buy a good router

I use an atom box, 20-25w tops. I can get it lower if I take out the hard drive and use a CF card.

I like using a pfsense router because it gives me maximum flexibility including a guest zone with layer 7 filtering (I filter out p2p on the guest LAN).

My ultimate goal is to get one of those plug computers and use that as a router. Fun.



fifty nine

join:2002-09-25
Sussex, NJ
kudos:2
reply to Angrychair

Re: The problem

said by Angrychair:

Not to even mention your linux machine being used as a router is a target, unlike an appliance router.

A compromised linux machine is a real problem, so it just seems like a lot more admin work and power use than most people would want in the long run.

Isn't that what you have a firewall for?

I run Snort IDS on my firewall too.


UHF
All static, all day, Forever
Premium,MVM
join:2002-05-24
reply to bdnhsv

Re: Great article

+1 Been running ClearOS/Clarkconnect for 10+ years, since version 0.6.



tomato

@rr.com
reply to 45612019

Re: What is this guy talking about?

Yep, awesome little white box. It only goes down quarterly when I reboot it to update the Tomato build (Toastman). QoS allows me to keep my VoIP line, web browsing, and gaming unaffected by BitTorrent traffic. I run an OpenVPN server off the box, which allowed me to shut off a PC I kept on for that purpose. Finally the print server means I don't have to keep that same PC on for network printing.


Angrychair

join:2000-09-20
Jacksonville, FL
reply to fifty nine

Re: The problem

Yes, of course you have a firewall for intrusion protection, isn't that axiomatic? My point is it's just a point of extended risk compared to an appliance.


ConstantineM

join:2011-09-02
San Jose, CA

1 recommendation

Pentium 4 3GHz is the worst hardware for a home router

The hardware advice in this article is really as bad as it could possibly get. Pentium 4, with upper clock speeds, is most certainly at the top of most power consumptive processors out there. Unless you get free electricity or live somewhere where it's always cold and using Pentium 4 as a space heater would make sense, It'll probably be cheaper to buy some used enterprise hardware than run a Pentium 4 as a router for just a couple of years.

For people looking into self-made x86 routers, I would highly suggest exploring the cheapo netbook market: for a mere 200 bucks new, plus a 20-dollar USB GigE stick, you can get yourself a nice little router with a free UPS, a free keyboard and "diagnostic display", and a pretty low power consumption and tiny size to top it off.

If you're getting the internet from an ONT (fibre-to-the-premises usually comes with an integrated UPS), this means, provided you do a wireless access point right out of the netbook-turned-router, you'll even have wireless internet when the power goes down, without any personal investment into any UPS solutions whatsoever! (-:



redxii
Premium,Mod
join:2001-02-26
Sherwood, MI

Probably a time out problem

I know Linksys set the connection timeout to 5 days (instead of around 120 seconds) so in order to use the router again it had to be reset (or wait 5 days), torrents and server lists didn't take much to fill up the table and lock it up. Had to use a 3rd-party firmware to lower the timeout to 120 seconds. You can specify up to 4096 connections, but my WRT54GL became very slow around 1024.
--
Moe, I need your advice… See I've got this friend named Joey Joe-Joe... Junior... Shabadoo..



axiomatic

join:2006-08-23
Tomball, TX

2 edits

Shuttle XG41 with ClearOS

Good timing guys. I am deploying a ClearOS install this very weekend on a Shuttle XG41. It's got dual NIC's and only draws 65w max on power.

Should be a nice upgrade from the limitations of most home wi-fi routers. I have an ASUS RT-N56U and it still doesn't do all I want it to do.

I've loaded ClearOS on an older PC already so I know ClearOS does what I need it to do but that old PC had a 1000w power supply in it, so that was only the test as that power supply was total overkill.

Hoping this Shuttle XG41 gets me the best of both worlds at a tolerable power footprint and then I can put the ASUS somewhere in the middle of my house as just a WAP instead of in the wiring closet in the far corner of the house as a router.



belawrence
They'll never let you in

join:2000-08-06
Santee, CA
reply to odog

Re: Not worth it

My Atom-based pfSense w/Compact Flash storage, gigabit LAN + WAN ports, and 1GB RAM draws 14-18 watts, depending on the situation. It's worth it to me as I can't find a similar spec'd device that can run Snort, multiple ipsec tunnels, NUT, and QOS without needing constant reboots. The only time I reboot it is after one of the infrequent firmware upgrades.



espaeth
Digital Plumber
Premium,MVM
join:2001-04-21
Minneapolis, MN
kudos:2
Reviews:
·Vitelity VOIP
reply to odog

said by odog:

good point... I had no idea how much money I was spending until I switched back from a monowall box to a Netgear WNDR3700.... it was costing me about $10 a month to power it!

Newer hardware is significantly better, particularly the Intel Sandybridge CPUs. A G630T system w/ DDR3 ram, SSD storage, and high efficiency power supply will idle around 20W and absolutely obliterate an Atom processor in benchmarks. Most handy if you want to run snort and other services on the box.

I actually run my linux router image as a Xen VM on a box that I use for home NAS to get the biggest bang for the buck.


espaeth
Digital Plumber
Premium,MVM
join:2001-04-21
Minneapolis, MN
kudos:2
Reviews:
·Vitelity VOIP
reply to Simba7

Re: My Router

said by Simba7:

I am thinking of shoving in 4GB of RAM and caching the entire DNS root servers.

You might want to look a little closer at how DNS works.