dslreports logo
site
spacer

spacer
 
    All Forums Hot Topics Gallery
spc

spacer




how-to block ads


view:
topics flat nest 
Comments on news posted 2012-05-24 14:45:43: An Ohio startup named Gigabit Squared, in conjunction with Gig U (a consortium of 30 research universities across the country) this week announced that they've launched a new program dedicated to bringing gigabit broadband speeds to six communities a.. ..


Automate

join:2001-06-26
Atlanta, GA

Easy with free money

"Levin's focus since has been to use stimulus funding to help improve university areas."

It's a lot easier to be successful when you get "free" money from the government.


elray

join:2000-12-16
Santa Monica, CA

What if?

What if the majority of your community and neighbors don't want to pay for FTTH?



ArrayList
netbus developer
Premium
join:2005-03-19
Evanston, IL
reply to Automate

Re: Easy with free money

there is no such thing as "free money"


me1212

join:2008-11-20
Pleasant Hill, MO
reply to Automate

Whats with the focus on universities? Why not other areas where people actually live in more permanent state?

Also when you say stimulus you mean the broadband stimulus from a few years ago? I thought the broadband stimulus money was supposed to be spent on connecting places that dont have broadband not place that do.



45612019

join:2004-02-05
New York, NY
reply to elray

Re: What if?

I don't want to pay for schools or the military but I have to anyway.

They'll have to suck it up because they don't know what's good for them. FTTH is a vital piece of infrastructure for the modern world.



Cjaiceman
Premium,MVM
join:2004-10-12
Parker, CO
kudos:2
reply to elray

Move?



Gig U to RDU

@unc.edu

Bring Gigabit to Durham, Raleigh, Chapel Hill

The Durham, Raleigh, Chapel Hill area of NC has the most dense population of Gig.U members within a given radius, plenty of fiber backhaul with Reserch Triangle Park, and no competition with current inernet providers; Time Warner and At&T. They should pick this are since Gig.U members would actually benefit from better internet service.



Simba7
I Void Warranties

join:2003-03-24
Billings, MT
reply to Automate

Re: Easy with free money

said by Automate:

It's a lot easier to be successful when you get "free" money from the government.

..you mean our increasing tuition costs is not actually covering their infrastructure upgrades?


quetwo
That VoIP Guy
Premium
join:2004-09-04
East Lansing, MI

GigU has been all talk so far...

At MSU, there has been all sorts of talk that "GigU" and the Gigabit Ethernet services are coming, in the works, etc. but nothing other than talk has happened. They shouldn't have Michigan State University on the list -- unless you are talking about political press-releases.



whfsdude
Premium
join:2003-04-05
Washington, DC
Reviews:
·Comcast
reply to me1212

Re: Easy with free money

said by me1212:

Whats with the focus on universities? Why not other areas where people actually live in more permanent state?

The reason the universities is because they have the middle mile network in many states. Combine that with the fact that they just have to pay a connector fee to get peering on Internet 2 TR-CPS.

Eg. Middle mile network. »www.maineren.net/

Automate

join:2001-06-26
Atlanta, GA
reply to ArrayList

Yes, that's why I put it in quotes.

Expand your moderator at work

tmc8080

join:2004-04-24
Brooklyn, NY
Reviews:
·ooma
·Optimum Online
·Verizon FiOS

U$F FUND$

This is supposed to happen through the use of USF funds..
however, what we apparently see is a small library in the middle of nowhere getting a $12k cisco router powerful enough to serve a small college (complete with cabinet, racks and cooling gear) that fit a medium sized closet. total installation cost $500k.. did I mention that it's served with an internet pipe equal to the highest tier that a residential account can get in the neighborhood... insane..

$500k could have brought last mile broadband to 100 or more homes in a suburb or 20-50 homes in a rural zone-- where AT&T, Comcast and Verizon REFUSE TO BUILD, but will not let others try...

Do we really need the 'MOVE IT!!' OR LOSE IT LAW (MONOPOLY FRANCHISE RIGHTS FOR INTERNET ACCESS) ??

If these companies don't upgrade a specified geography say, within 7 more years (suburban), 12 years (rural) to a minimum broadband.. say 100/100 megabits, they lose exclusive franchise monopoly rights and no law can override or restrict a community's access to get outside competitors.

It's not surprising that broadband would be more popular around universities since most colleges will have a cluster of fiber/coax supporting peak usage of hundreds of megabits (minimum) +

Stony Brook University (SUNY) used to have multiple T3 telco lines back in 94 and OC192s in 96/97-- can't imagine it being less than 100GIG fiber by now..


Cobra11M

join:2010-12-23
reply to 45612019

Re: What if?

very true, I wish their was some here 10mbps seems so slow compared to some other peoples on here


reply to tmc8080

Re: U$F FUND$

I posted eariler from work but even at a University as large as UNC Chapel Hill, we only have dual 10gig uplinks in diverse path and that is not even maxed out according to our director of networking. Even Universities might not have the total thoughput you would think. Anything larger then 10gig uplinks is expensive. BYW - Duke, UNC, and NC State are all Gig.U members and they are less than 20 miles distance between the three.


me1212

join:2008-11-20
Pleasant Hill, MO
reply to whfsdude

Re: Easy with free money

If its the middle mile thats understandable, but not all are. Plus improving the middle mile doesn't magically wire places that were not wired before. The broadband stimulus was created to wire unwired places not give wired places more wire.


elray

join:2000-12-16
Santa Monica, CA
Reviews:
·Time Warner Cable
·EarthLink
reply to 45612019

Re: What if?

said by 45612019:

I don't want to pay for schools or the military but I have to anyway.

They'll have to suck it up because they don't know what's good for them. FTTH is a vital piece of infrastructure for the modern world.

"Free" compulsory education is required by the courts, the military is mandated by the Constitution.

FTTH, I'm afraid, isn't on the list, and it isn't a "Vital piece of infrastructure for the modern world."

Oh sure, its nice to have. And I'm among the minority that are willing to pay the necessary premium for it - i.e. $5K install and $100+/month, but the majority isn't anywhere near as willing, and they certainly aren't going to be told to subsidize you.

The market *will* eventually grind these costs down substantially, where passes get below $1K and monthlies can get below $50, but rural folks aren't willing to pay even that.

As for being told to "suck it up", I don't think that's going to go over very well. Better to use the Jack Tramiel angle, and make the folks feel guilty that somehow, some way, little Johnny won't graduate preschool if he can't stream Netflix.

davidhoffman
Premium
join:2009-11-19
Warner Robins, GA
kudos:1
reply to me1212

Re: Easy with free money

I went to the Illinois Institute of Technology (IIT) in Chicago. It is located around 3300 South Michigan Ave. Surrounded by public housing projects and neighborhoods that had half of the lots vacant from neglected or arson buildings having been torn down. There are other colleges in similar situations. Traditional neighborhood and business revitalization programs would be greatly helped if you could add in the capabilities of gigabit symmetrical internet service. One way to do that is to expand the university or college internet capability into the surrounding area.


tmc8080

join:2004-04-24
Brooklyn, NY
Reviews:
·ooma
·Optimum Online
·Verizon FiOS
reply to Gig U to RDU

Re: U$F FUND$

Two major factors in NY's advantage.. MAJOR backbones of the internet run into the heart of NY state and fiber optics by the major telcos from NY tel, to bell atlantic to Verizon and the cable companies run fiber throughout the NY metro area.. This geography BLEED excess fiber optics, thus making a research university like Stony Brook high up on the list to get the tech toys.. even if they dont' fully utilize them. Maybe (residential campus computing) isn't 100gig (multiple 10's? since avg speed is 40mbits per user, not including wifi connections).. and the network is probably partitioned so that the Internet-2 connections are separate from the main network.. Where Stony Brook left off using these I2 pipes with Computer Science.. they pick up using it for the telemedicine and other applications.. they just don't heavily advertise that they have them because they are special purpose connections. They constantly do upgrades to the fiber optic signalling equipment to break new throughput records per strand and that story isn't told as much anymore. The average residential consumer won't probably see internet-2 speeds in their lifetime unless working under these conditions because the telecom industry are greedy, and conservative in their aproach to broadband deployment-- even Verizon and Google.


25139889

join:2011-10-25
Toledo, OH

Case Western Reserve University

has been behind this project for YEARS. They've actually was the first to offer 1gbps Internet to the community- even before the Muni's even thought about building their network.

Thanks to OneCommunity and CWRU this actually happens.



PGHammer

join:2003-06-09
Accokeek, MD
reply to tmc8080

Re: U$F FUND$

This plan is not new - far from it.

Have we forgotten about the much earlier (pre-FIOS, in fact) Blacksburg Electronic Village (BEV), a JV between the Commonwealth of Virginia, Virginia Tech, and the City of Blacksburg? (»www.bev.org)