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Comments on news posted 2012-09-27 14:07:35: Back in August word leaked out that Dish was going to start selling a nationwide satellite broadband offering, and today the company confirmed the service is going live next week. ..

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perkqlater

join:2009-07-25
Mechanicsville, VA
reply to compuguybna

Re: who's the actual provider??


NiteSn0w

join:2010-12-24
reply to Simba7

Re: What's the latency gonna be?

said by Simba7:

Just have a caching proxy and 20TBs worth of SSDs and you'd be set.

How well do hard drives work in the cold vacuum of space?

I have no idea, everything would likely have to be custom made to work in space. I doubt they could use anything other than solid state drives unless they use heavy shielding.

OmagicQ
Posting in a thread near you

join:2003-10-23
Bakersfield, CA
kudos:1

If I had no other choice

If I lived out in the middle of nowhere off-grid (solar power, well water, etc) then I'd get it. I'd probably use something like a web accelerator that compresses webpages so less data is used. No streaming video but with a decent channel package a person could do fine without Netflix, Youtube etc.
--
...Who, What, When, Where, How... Why? Why Not?


skeechan
Ai Otsukaholic
Premium
join:2012-01-26
AA169|170
kudos:2
Reviews:
·Clear Wireless
·Cox HSI
·Verizon FiOS
reply to Oh_No

Re: Cue whiners crying it isn't as good as FiOS

Uh, no it's not. $50 1000KB/s Satellite is competing with $5 3KB/s dial up.

No one runs their dial up service 24/7 or could even keep it connected 24/7. What people use it for is quick stuff, FB, email, surfing...PAINFUL bordering on the impossible with dialup.


skeechan
Ai Otsukaholic
Premium
join:2012-01-26
AA169|170
kudos:2
reply to Oh_No
LOL, it's no longer a voice line if you are running it 24/7


BimmerE38FN

join:2002-09-15
Boise, ID
kudos:1

Nothing new...Glad the speed is faster...

This isn't the first time they dabbled in SAT internet....Anyone remember StarBand?

silbaco
Premium
join:2009-08-03
USA
They are still around actually. I wish they would get into the next generation race though. We desperately need a third competitor or Satellite service will continue to stagnant.


Andy from CA
Premium
join:2008-09-05
Anaheim, CA
reply to skeechan

Re: Cue whiners crying it isn't as good as FiOS

said by skeechan:

LOL, it's no longer a voice line if you are running it 24/7

Back in the day (80s) you could get a second line without any special install or billing. My dad had a fax line in Huntington Beach California. Can you still get a second line without much hassle and would a dedicated dial-up line make much sense these days?


skeechan
Ai Otsukaholic
Premium
join:2012-01-26
AA169|170
kudos:2
GTE in Huntington Beach always charged for each line. Same bill, but each line was billed separately. I don't know how your dad got line 2 for free.


Andy from CA
Premium
join:2008-09-05
Anaheim, CA
said by skeechan:

GTE in Huntington Beach always charged for each line. Same bill, but each line was billed separately. I don't know how your dad got line 2 for free.

No, he paid for both lines, it wasn't a hassle getting a second line was my point. Our neighbors wanted a third and they had to jump through hoops to get it. That's what I meant, everyone could get two but most only got one.


skeechan
Ai Otsukaholic
Premium
join:2012-01-26
AA169|170
kudos:2
Reviews:
·Clear Wireless
·Cox HSI
·Verizon FiOS
Oh, yeah. All the homes where are wired 2 line (at least the ones in south HB and NW HB). The point was dial up isn't "$5" because it requires the phone line, especially if as the other poster wanted to do, run it 24/7 as a dial up connection. Here, basic line with tax is close to $20 with Verizon, $17 with AT&T because of the taxes and fees.

mrschwarz

join:2001-12-01
Flower Mound, TX

I want to look into this.

I'm a full time RVer. I use Millenicom which connects to the Verizon 3g network. I pay $60 per month for 20 GB with less speed. I am already a Dish subscriber so I'll save $10 per month (don't know about equipment costs), get faster speed, more latency, and less worry about cell towers.

If I can connect from an RV, I'm interested.


compuguybna

join:2009-06-17
Nashville, TN
Reviews:
·Millenicom
·HughesNet Satell..
·ooma
·Virgin Mobile Br..
·Charter

New Plans Revealed!

Click for full size
lower caps (1/2 of the regular plans thru Hughes), and slower speeds on the basic plan.

WHAT VALUE! LOL

9.99 lease fee STILL APPLIES!


Simba7
I Void Warranties

join:2003-03-24
Billings, MT
reply to anon202

Re: Caps, lol

said by anon202 :

In reality, you see 41.200 or so in places where satellite competes.

If that. I remember fixing a computer 10mi out and the fastest her dialup line would connect to was 26.4kbps. This was with my USRobotics v.92 Courier modem.

It would've been faster just to take her computer, drive into town, connect it to my router, and fetch the updates instead of waiting a day or two.
--
Bresnan 30M/5M | CenturyLink 5M/896K
MyWS[PnmIIX3@3.2G,8G RAM,500G+1.5T+2T HDDs,Win7]
WifeWS[A64@2G,2G RAM,120G HDD,Win7]
Router[2xP3@1G,2G RAM,18G HDD,Allied Telesyn AT2560FX,2xDigital DE504,Sun X1034A,2xSun X4444A,SMC 8432BTA,Gentoo]


GAFarm

@bellsouth.net

Still Skeptical

I'm trying to read through the press release hype to figure out, in reality, what is truly being offered. Do I recall correctly that there is some government money behind getting "broadband" to rural residents? We are certainly an under served segment of the industry. It's understandable that cable and DSL doesn't seemed to have jumped to answer the call, it would require a huge investment. It could be recouped by a surcharge to the subscriber for a certain period. Much like old POTS land line was back in the '50s and '60s. I would certainly pay more for a time to help defray the cost of getting cable in this farming community 7 miles each from the two nearest cable networks. Farms, dairys and other rural businesses, plus rural residents, require internet access to the same extent that surb/urban businesses and residents do. At our farm, where I also run another business that requires online access, we jumped on board when DirecWay/HughesNet became available. I don't need to detail the disadvantages, those who've had DW/HN know them, those that haven't don't need to read through the nightmare. The best that can be said is that it was better than dialup. We jumped offboard as soon as decent (3g) wireless broadband become available. It is getting better, but I think it's a GREAT day when I can get 1.5mg speed and that is sporadic. (Full disclosure, nearest tower is 7 line of sight miles, so that is probably pretty good.) Not sure where Verizon and ATT get their % LTE coverage PR numbers, it has to be headcount, not geography. Both carriers admit converting towers that serve low volume areas will be the very last on their list. We JUST got 3G from ATT.
I worry a bit that the powers that be will adapt satellite as the universal acceptable solution to "broadband to the boonies" and we will never see an incentive to cable to extend their networks.
So, what do we do here? Several in the community still have HughesNet. They have just stuck with them, and the promise that "things are getting better". Several, like me, have mobile broadband. Others put up with dial up.
Is the new Dish offering truly something better--new technology--or just something warmed over and rebranded?

GaFarm

join:2012-03-24
Waycross, GA
I'm trying to read through the press release hype to figure out, in reality, what is truly being offered. Do I recall correctly that there is some government money behind getting "broadband" to rural residents? We are certainly an under served segment of the industry. It's understandable that cable and DSL doesn't seemed to have jumped to answer the call, it would require a huge investment. It could be recouped by a surcharge to the subscriber for a certain period. Much like old POTS land line was back in the '50s and '60s. I would certainly pay more for a time to help defray the cost of getting cable in this farming community 7 miles each from the two nearest cable networks. Farms, dairys and other rural businesses, plus rural residents, require internet access to the same extent that surb/urban businesses and residents do.
At our farm, where I also run another business that requires online access, we jumped on board when DirecWay/HughesNet became available. I don't need to detail the disadvantages, those who've had DW/HN know them, those that haven't don't need to read through the nightmare. The best that can be said is that it was better than dialup. We jumped offboard as soon as decent (3g) wireless broadband become available. It is getting better, but I think it's a GREAT day when I can get 1.5mg speed and that is sporadic. (Full disclosure, nearest tower is 7 line of sight miles, so that is probably pretty good.)
Not sure where Verizon and ATT get their % LTE coverage PR numbers, it has to be headcount, not geography. Both carriers admit converting towers that serve low volume areas will be the very last on their list. We JUST got 3G from ATT.
I worry a bit that the powers that be will adapt satellite as the universal acceptable solution to "broadband to the boonies" and we will never see an incentive to cable to extend their networks.
So, what do we do here? Several in the community still have HughesNet. They have just stuck with them, and the promise that "things are getting better". Several, like me, have mobile broadband. Others put up with dial up.
Is the new Dish offering truly something better--new technology--or just something warmed over and rebranded?


jhejr2

join:2010-10-10
Verona, MS

Satellite Broadband Dish Network

A friend changed over to the new Dish Network satellite broadband this week. Works well for him,better than 19.2 dialup. $39.95 per month,with his dish package for tv. Not an expert on internet stuff. It works good for him,and the price is good. Was paying $19.95 for dialup. I am shure satellite internet has it problems,but so dose my over priced Comcast internet. Install and equipment rental free for 24 months.


compuguybna

join:2009-06-17
Nashville, TN
Reviews:
·Millenicom
·HughesNet Satell..
·ooma
·Virgin Mobile Br..
·Charter

4 edits
Better make sure of that...... the 9.99 equipment rental fee applies and is NOT free!!!!

and that plan is capped at 5GB anytime and 5GB (2am-8am).

said by jhejr2:

A friend changed over to the new Dish Network satellite broadband this week. Works well for him,better than 19.2 dialup. $39.95 per month,with his dish package for tv. Not an expert on internet stuff. It works good for him,and the price is good. Was paying $19.95 for dialup. I am shure satellite internet has it problems,but so dose my over priced Comcast internet. Install and equipment rental free for 24 months.



compuguybna

join:2009-06-17
Nashville, TN

AND capped

and that plan is capped at 5GB anytime and 5GB (2am-8am).

whozzit

join:2003-03-26
Westwood, CA
Reviews:
·DigitalPath
reply to perkqlater

Re: Walk a mile in my shoes...

Perkqlater... I've got to consider myself lucky, I guess. I live in a tiny town, miles from anywhere, but I do have a wireless fixed ISP (not satellite) and at their lowest teir I get 3 MB/s down and 1 MB/s up with no caps whatsoever. There is telco DSL in this town but it couldn't compete with the speed or reliability. The telco-provided DSL kept all other DSL out of this town but my Wireless ISP got around that by not using any cable or phone lines; it uses the air. My telephone service is through a NetTalk decice (VoIP) with a local number. All calls outgoing come to a total of $28 per year. All calls incoming sound just fine. So my VoIP telephone service uses no cable or telephone lines either. My house is online 24/7. Power outages can be the only problem with my complete system but I run my "computer room" on a charger, to batteries, to an inverter which allows me more than 40 hours of online time and lighting in said "computer room". My power setup was inspired by the telephone exchanges that I maintained all over the US, Canada and the middle east from 1967 through 2001. I could increase my "buffer" by adding an emergency generator (as per the telephone exchanges) but I have found my 40 hour power buffer to sufice for now. My 40 hour buffer can be increased through normal downtime where the computers are concerned and if the power outage is for more than 40 hours (it sometimes is), I'm usually ready to throw the towel in by then anyway.
463-995 Fern Way-Westwood, CA


ViciousVPS

join:2000-08-06
Lake Mary, FL

It is all relative..

1) If you're in the market for Satellite Internet you must assume you're either off telco & cable grids, or stuck in the 56kbps dialup, 64kbps single channel isdn, 128kbps dual channel isdn, if you're on the more fortunate side of this hypothetical, you'll probably have 786kbps - 3Mbit/6Mbit max ADSL. perhaps some obscure niche WiFi territory with the addition of 'middle of no where style' 3G reception. 4G at this time be it LTE or WiMAX is almost surely not within this infrastructure geographically limited marketshare.

So basically what it comes down to for these poor but still significantly large sparse geographical market is if you're in ADSL range, or wired with doscis. If not? Guess you're going to be enjoying your Satellite Internet for 'broadband' and perhaps a 56k dialup setup for low-mid latency gaming. (ISDN being the best low latency side-kick to the large throughput of the Satellite) given a combo like this you are probably doing just about as good as you could do given your restrictions, bulk data transfer via ISDN so you don't eat into your tiny 20GB cap (though cellphones are typically capped at 4GB to put it in perspective).

Now why would they try to compete with only a 20 GB limit ? Well you see Satellites are a hugely expensive single structure, its quite different from the transfer quota any other type of infrastructure can provide. Satellite = Few Transmission Systems, but forced to handle a much much larger percentage of subscribers on a single 'node' if you will, and in this situation you can't simply launch more satellites, or add upgraded switches to the satellite so they can't go with the oversell your infrastructure route, they simply are matching who matters, their direct competition of other satellite carriers. Because like I first pointed out, if you're shopping satellite, you're typically doomed anyways..

-mc3

hclarkjr

join:2002-08-09
Hostetter, PA

dish broadband

i have a friend who just had this installed today. the tech could not get the computer to connect to the internet. he left a phone number for them to call to have somebody else come out to try and get it to work. they are going from dial up to this, would the tech have to remove the dial up modem physically to get it to work?