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Comments on news posted 2012-11-30 08:21:26: In Holland, semi-legalizing cannabis led to a flourishing trade in spliff dealing ‘coffee’ shops; in the UK, the communications regulator, Ofcom, may have given a similar boost to small businesses last week when it clarified the UK’s n.. ..



tommmyboy

@comcast.net

anon mobile broadband

as ,mobile broadband gets cheaper and caps bigger we could see a lot of people in countries around the world drop wired broadband for mobile. not necessarily for price or mobility but for anonymity. in nearly every country there are at least a few option for mobile service without needing to identify ones self.


Skippy25

join:2000-09-13
Hazelwood, MO

Terms and Conditions

"However, I can see one possible conflict of interests. Smalls businesses such as coffee shops often use home broadband connections to supply their patrons and liability under these connections’ terms and conditions is fairly black and white.

Just take a look at O2 broadband’s policy: “You’re responsible for all use of the Services… whether an unacceptable use occurs or is attempted, whether you knew or should have known about it, whether or not you carried out or attempted the unacceptable use alone, contributed to or acted with others or allowed any unacceptable use to occur by omission.” That seems to cover just about everything. "


They can say whatever they want in there, that does not make it written in stone. If the law says they are not liable as a public wifi provider to their consumers, then they are not liable regardless of what the ISP says.



RARPSL

join:1999-12-08
Suffern, NY

said by Skippy25:

"However, I can see one possible conflict of interests. Smalls businesses such as coffee shops often use home broadband connections to supply their patrons and liability under these connections’ terms and conditions is fairly black and white.

Just take a look at O2 broadband’s policy: “You’re responsible for all use of the Services… whether an unacceptable use occurs or is attempted, whether you knew or should have known about it, whether or not you carried out or attempted the unacceptable use alone, contributed to or acted with others or allowed any unacceptable use to occur by omission.” That seems to cover just about everything. "


They can say whatever they want in there, that does not make it written in stone. If the law says they are not liable as a public wifi provider to their consumers, then they are not liable regardless of what the ISP says.

OTOH: If the business is paying for a home not a business connection (as noted) the ISP while it can not go after them due to being a WiFi provider can still pull their connection if they do not upgrade to a business connection. That TOS does not allow for using "It was done via WiFi" exemption. Only a business connection would allow for WiFi provision to customers.

rradina

join:2000-08-08
Chesterfield, MO

This Crap Is Ridiculous

I don't agree with piracy but it's insane for victims to seek satisfaction from anyone but the person who actually made them a victim.

Public transportation enables crooks to travel from point A to point B, commit a crime and then return with the loot. Is public transportation being held responsible?

The telephone system can be used to make illegal gambling bets, has it been held responsible for enabling the crime?

The mail system can be used to send instructions and money to someone who them commits a crime. Is the mail system held responsible?

Electricity can be used to power the drill that puts a hole in the safe (I know -- classic Hollywood scene) and rob the bank. Is the electric company held responsible?

IMO the biggest problem is what we do on-line shouldn't be tracked without due process granting "wire tap" permission to record our "conversation". Yes, that includes the Google's of the world that try to profile you. If you want to login to Google first and you agree to be tracked for mutual benefit, fine. Otherwise, what my IP does on-line should not be tracked in any database.

I know such an approach makes it harder to catch the bad elements in our society but it's just insane to try to make the entire system responsible for what folks do with it. If we had more protection of what seems like a reasonable right to privacy, it seems like a lot of this noise would disappear.

Does the post office keep track of every piece of mail to and from your mailbox and sell it to someone that tries to profile you?

I know the phone company tracks calls but that should stop too. There's no need to track phone calls if you have an unlimited plan.


tmc8080

join:2004-04-24
Brooklyn, NY

global crackdown?

it seems these notifications are targeted to be coordinated to Q1-2013...

in the US & UK... probably other countries are set to begin similar 'new world order' laws too..


dra6o0n

join:2011-08-15
Mississauga, ON

Oh really?

"many Britons have very little idea what constitutes an illegal online activity"

Why not apply that to almost every other thing that exists in this world?


JKukiewicz

join:2011-03-29
W1 8RP

You're right, many people don't understand many other laws: it doesn't make them invalid. In addition, if people eventually start being prosecuted under the DEA I suspect a higher proportion will quickly gain a better understanding (!).