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Comments on news posted 2013-05-09 08:33:23: (attachment)This picture (click to enlarge) says it all, though Dan Frommer says some more. . ..



gigahurtz
Premium
join:2001-10-20
Palm Coast, FL

1 recommendation

Far too many people are still using AOL.

I see many people on a daily basis who still use AOL. It's disappointing when you hear someone say they need to get on AOL to search for something. So many in this country still don't understand the basic concepts of the internet and how it works.



karpodiem
Hail to The Victors
Premium
join:2008-05-20
Detroit, MI

AOL is a symptom of an underlying disease

human stupidity and an awful national broadband policy

»www.businessinsider.com/aol-subs···t-2013-2



IowaCowboy
Iowa native
Premium
join:2010-10-16
Springfield, MA

AOL could make a comeback

AOL could make a comeback if cable companies were forced to lease bandwidth at cost to competing ISPs like telephone companies have to do so with CLECs.



orion940
Attractive like a magnet
Premium
join:2001-12-23
Windsor, CT

Whats funny as s****, is the folks who paid for AOL after it was free. Someone actually said to me a couple years ago, you mean its free?

O.
--
Windsor, Home of the Decorative Zamboni



gaforces
United We Stand, Divided We Fall

join:2002-04-07
Santa Cruz, CA
reply to IowaCowboy

They chose to be obsolete and slow, let them reap what they sow.
--
Let them eat FIBER!



mikesterr

join:2008-04-18
Atco, NJ

1 recommendation

reply to orion940

That's so funny you say that, had same thing happen to me. An X G/F's Mom said to me, How do you change the Credit Card AOL charges to, I want to put it on a Different Card. I said I thought you had Fios from Verizon, She said I do. I said well then you don't need to Pay AOL for anything anymore. she had Fios for 2 years and was still paying AOL $20 bucks a month.



PaulHikeS2

join:2003-03-06
Manchester, NH
reply to IowaCowboy

said by IowaCowboy:

AOL could make a comeback if cable companies were forced to lease bandwidth at cost to competing ISPs like telephone companies have to do so with CLECs.

This make no sense. Why would they ever have to do this? Cable companies paid their own money to build their network. It was neither funded nor subsidized with taxpayer dollars like the ILECs copper networks.
--
Jay: What the @#$% is the internet???


hey hey hey

@charter.com
reply to IowaCowboy

said by IowaCowboy:

AOL could make a comeback if cable companies were forced to lease bandwidth at cost to competing ISPs like telephone companies have to do so with CLECs.

So ISP should pay the cost of building and maintaining infrastructure then basically let other companies use said infrastructure to undercut them on pricing since they have no infrastructure costs themselves. Yeah makes sense. Sounds totally fair.

If I were and ISP under that scenario why bother making improvements to said infrastructure? Since I would be forced to cut my pricing which means less profits also no matter how low my prices are some people will go to this new competition anyways so that's even more reduced profits. So why spend any money on making improvements? Where is my incentive? Why should I spend millions if not billions so some other company can use MY improvements to take my customers away? It's kind of easy for these guys to say "hey look were cheaper than the evil, greedy cable company" when one doesn't have any infrastructure costs. I also find it ironic to bash the company that is giving you the means to even exist.

Can you imagine if other businesses worked that way?


ilikeme
I live in a van down by the river.
Premium
join:2002-08-27
Sugar Land, TX
kudos:1
Reviews:
·Vonage
reply to mikesterr

Same thing happened to me when working on my friends moms computer. She said she was having problems getting AOL to work and was annoyed because she was still paying ~$20/month for it just to keep her e-mail address. I knew they use Comcast for their internet and told her AOL had been free if she just wanted the e-mail for at least 3 years (at the time) and she was shocked. I fixed the problem she was having and she switched to the free plan.
--

Fiber Optics is the future of high-speed internet access. Stop by the BBR Fiber Optic Forum



cork1958
Cork
Premium
join:2000-02-26
reply to orion940

Man! It took me YEARS to get my sister off that crap and she STILL doesn't have a clue as to what she's doing with a computer!!

Using AOL makes one more brain dead then some people I know who lives depend on Facebook!!
--
The Firefox alternative.
»www.mozilla.org/projects/seamonkey/



RayRay

@100tb.com

Netflix began streaming around Q1 2008

A breakdown of traditional vs Watch Now subscribers would make the chart much more informative.



Squire James

@embarqhsd.net

Easy Come, Easy Go

I am not ashamed to have been an AOL customer in the past - they were once the easiest and best way to get on the Internet. Today? Not so much.


kevinds
Premium
join:2003-05-01
Calgary, AB
kudos:3
reply to hey hey hey

Re: AOL could make a comeback

They still get money from the subscribers,
The ISPs don't have to support the customers,
The ISP may not make as much money, but they still make more money than they would if that subscriber went to another service.

Look at the wireless industry, and all the MVNOs
--
Yes, I am not employed and looking for IT work. Have passport, will travel.



Rambo76098

join:2003-02-21
Columbus, OH
Reviews:
·WOW Internet and..
reply to hey hey hey

No one is saying they should lease it below cost. But there's a point where they can sell it at cost, sans overhead and profit, and the ISP would still come out ahead. The lines are still going to be there, and you're still going to incur a lot of the same expenses whether or not customer X is on your infrastructure thru reseller #1.

Surprisingly enough, manufacturing/selling at cost can sometime be better than not selling at all. I'd recommend reading "The Goal" by Goldratt. Pretty interesting stuff.



FLATLINE

join:2007-02-27
Buffalo, NY

You people amaze me. Try doing some research in what these companies charge you and what their costs are. I'm not even talking specifically about ISPs. Look into a number of companies. Chances are your being ripped off in some way shape or form. But yet here you are arguing for them as if they give two shits about you. Its pathetic, its sad, but most of all you just make yourselves look foolish. Well done!


cramer
Premium
join:2007-04-10
Raleigh, NC
kudos:8
reply to IowaCowboy

said by IowaCowboy:

... lease bandwidth at cost to competing ISPs ...

Except for the at cost part. A UNE (dry pair) is expensive. CO space is damned expensive. They only people who have ever been able to effectively sell DSL is the telco who owns the CO and cable plant; they have always made it expensive for anyone else to step in their sand box. (note: why do you think 99% of T1s run today are 2-wire HDSL circuits right up to the customer?)

When we resold Covad DSL, we kept between $6 and $9 per line -- out of $80 to $120. (the UNE cost Covad 60-80$ depending on where in the US the customer was. we (a LD company) were paying bellsouth $45+ for a UNE (circa '03). At a previous job (circa '99) at a pure ISP, bellsouth wanted $60 per UNE -- not a surprise as they had just started the FastAccess DSL arm of BellSouth.net.)

cramer
Premium
join:2007-04-10
Raleigh, NC
kudos:8
reply to gaforces

AOL was a child of the dialup age. That age ended a decade ago. I'm surprised anyone bothers to maintain modem banks these days.


cramer
Premium
join:2007-04-10
Raleigh, NC
kudos:8
reply to PaulHikeS2

To be fair, most cable networks were originally built through franchise agreements with various incentives to get someone to foot the bill for building it. Those networks have made billions over many decades, but they would not have been built -- investment of millions -- without the tax breaks, free access to right-of-way and poll attachment, and the monopoly guarantee of the franchise. (and local government secured contracts)



PaulHikeS2

join:2003-03-06
Manchester, NH

said by cramer:

To be fair, most cable networks were originally built through franchise agreements with various incentives to get someone to foot the bill for building it. Those networks have made billions over many decades, but they would not have been built -- investment of millions -- without the tax breaks, free access to right-of-way and poll attachment, and the monopoly guarantee of the franchise. (and local government secured contracts)

The only one to foot the bill were the cable providers. Remember, franchise agreements are made by the individual municipalities, local taxes cannot possibly fund a network. Poles are not usually owned by the municipality - the cablecos pay the phone or electric company for attachment. That's not free. Also, there is no monopoly guarantee of the franchise. Remember, exclusive agreements are illegal. That's why there are overbuilders in some areas. You are correct about right of way access, though. My main point is that the building of the networks was funded primarily by the companies, not the taxpayers.
--
Jay: What the @#$% is the internet???

cramer
Premium
join:2007-04-10
Raleigh, NC
kudos:8

The only one to foot the bill were the cable providers.

While technically true, in that the city didn't write a check, they did subsidize the construction through reduced tax rates, a legal monopoly preventing competition, and ironclad contracts with the city. Sure, the city couldn't write a check for construction, but it sure as hell did sign long-term contracts to buy various services.

Remember, franchise agreements are made by the individual municipalities, local taxes cannot possibly fund a network.

Not directly, but there are MANY ways around that.

Poles are not usually owned by the municipality - the cablecos pay the phone or electric company for attachment.

Even back then, the poles were "public infrastructure" under the control of the Public Utility Commission. They were installed by the power company, but legally owned by the PUC. And the PUC regulates access, and sets (and collects) fees for attachment. (that's "the deal" for putting them on right-of-ways.)

Also, there is no monopoly guarantee of the franchise. Remember, exclusive agreements are illegal.

Yes there is, or was as they're aren't legal anymore. If you really think the government doesn't hand out monopolies, try building your own power, water, or gas system. Hell, just try to build your own power generator (hydro, wind, or solar -- 'tho solar is getting easier) [for the record, my grandfather tried that 30+/- years ago... duke power created such a shit-storm of red-tape he abandoned the idea... a dam on a creek that would've made a few kWh. We got our revenge when they wanted to run a transmission line across the property.]


intok

join:2012-03-15
reply to hey hey hey

Can you imagine that they can rent the access to their backbone out?



intok

join:2012-03-15
reply to Squire James

Re: Easy Come, Easy Go

Who here can't say that they didn't abuse about 50,000 hours of AOL free discs? I used to love when they'd mail them during their peak, since they came in nice tin CD holders, and I had piled of free AOL floppies when I needed a spare disk, the free AOL CDs where on the checkout counter of just about every store.

Now, if you actually paid for AOL dialup, they you sir where an idiot, since we where tripping over the CDs in the gutter and kids used them as frisbees everywhere. I'm still finding them in boxes in my storage.



hey hey hey

@charter.com
reply to kevinds

Re: AOL could make a comeback

said by kevinds:

Look at the wireless industry, and all the MVNOs

because Big Government forces them too. Let those MNVOs build out their own networks.


ITALIAN926

join:2003-08-16
kudos:2
reply to mikesterr

All 3 million customers they have, probably dont need it. They probably have like 10,000 people actually using the dialup service. Hysterical.


kevinds
Premium
join:2003-05-01
Calgary, AB
kudos:3
reply to hey hey hey

And I'm sure some of them would like to if were allowed to get spectrum too...

I wasn't aware that the gov't forced them to offer service to the MVNOs though
--
Yes, I am not employed and looking for IT work. Have passport, will travel.



TheToro
Premium
join:2003-06-05
N8B3L8
reply to intok

Re: Easy Come, Easy Go

who are you calling an idiot? you can't even spell "were"


biochemistry
Premium
join:2003-05-09
92361

AOL became Netflix

Once upon a time, AOL was a great source for downloading movies (and games and apps). That probably ended around the year 2000. Now Netflix offers movies for cheaper and legally. It's basically what AOL should have done with their company.



dynomutt

@comcast.net

Hey, AOL provides great services

Like MapQuest and Huffington Post

I'm sure those make loads and loads of revenue for AOL and can sustain it on their own for years to come!

/sarc



SysOp

join:2001-04-18
Douglasville, GA

I still use aol

music.aol.com