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Comments on news posted 2014-04-28 13:00:18: With Hulu's owners being Comcast NBC, Viacom and Disney, it's probably not particularly surprising to see news that Hulu is now blocking VPN users over "piracy" concerns. ..

page: 1 · 2 · 3 · next

pandora
Premium
join:2001-06-01
Outland
kudos:2

It makes sense, they want to know who you are

It makes sense, the companies concerned want a valid real IP address of the accessing user.
--
Congress could mess up a one piece jigsaw puzzle.


Elbert

@24.131.37.x

From a copyright point of view, it might make sense, but not privacy

I don't see why I, as the end user, have to give up my privacy to use Hulu.

Perhaps I use a VPN 24/7 simply because I choose to make it more difficult for the various trackers (of which there are many) to know my identity. I live in the US, pay my taxes, but don't want the entire world to know who I am.

Why would I want to lower my personal gates just in order to satisfy Hulu?

Answer: I wouldn't. Seems like Hulu needs to get with the program and realize that they don't trump MY needs.


coldmoon
Premium
join:2002-02-04
Broadway, NC
Reviews:
·Windstream

1 recommendation

Total BS...

You have to sign into Hulu to use Hulu so what difference does your current IP have to do with you having a valid account?

This is nothing more than an attempt to track site users by force of policy and not because it has any useful relevance for "privacy"

JMHO
--
Quietzone - Protection you can trust!

ptbarnett

join:2002-09-30
Lewisville, TX

1 recommendation

Set up your own VPN.

There are multiple fractional server providers around the US. Set up one, install Ubuntu or your favorite Linux, and then OpenVPN server. Put OpenVPN on your client (Windows, Mac, Linux, iOS, Android), and you are set.

I already have one for a personal email and web server. It's $20/month, with a discount if I pay annually. Excess bandwidth above the generous allowance is 10 cents/gigabyte. You may find a better deal, but I'm happy with my existing provider.

However, I don't use it to stream video. My primary concern is security when I'm traveling and using unsecured WiFi in a hotel

AVonGauss
Premium
join:2007-11-01
Boynton Beach, FL

Blah...

My guess is its all about protecting the stone age concept of "regions".


nekkidtruth
YISMM
Premium
join:2002-05-20
London, ON
kudos:2

3 recommendations

reply to Elbert

Re: From a copyright point of view, it might make sense, but not privacy

I say let them shoot themselves in the foot. They must be confident that there won't be a significant loss of revenue due to this. Something tells me they'll be in for a little bit of a surprise.
--
Weeeeeee

Kearnstd
Space Elf
Premium
join:2002-01-22
Mullica Hill, NJ
kudos:1

Except its not piracy to use a VPN

If someone from the UK got a US VPN to watch US programming it would not be piracy and in fact would not violate any laws at all. There is nothing in copyright law that states you must be in the country where the content originated. The VPN usage is not unauthorized access because the content is posted to the net for free anyway.
--
[65 Arcanist]Filan(High Elf) Zone: Broadband Reports


nekkidtruth
YISMM
Premium
join:2002-05-20
London, ON
kudos:2
reply to ptbarnett

Re: Set up your own VPN.

Not a very good idea for a service streaming video content.
--
Weeeeeee

ptbarnett

join:2002-09-30
Lewisville, TX
reply to coldmoon

Re: Total BS...

said by coldmoon:

You have to sign into Hulu to use Hulu so what difference does your current IP have to do with you having a valid account?

Your login is associated with a billing address, but there are obviously ways to create a billing address elsewhere.

Hulu's licensing agreements limit distribution to the United States. It's like the region coding on a DVD: you are only supposed to play it in the region for which it was manufacturers.

Other companies have the rights to distribute some of Hulu's content outside the US. So, Hulu is technically violating those agreements if someone outside the US streams the content.


nekkidtruth
YISMM
Premium
join:2002-05-20
London, ON
kudos:2
Reviews:
·WIND Mobile
·Rogers Hi-Speed
reply to Kearnstd

Re: Except its not piracy to use a VPN

This isn't actually true. It's truly a big grey area. Realistically, you're required to have a U.S. address to be able to view the content legally. In essence, you're committing fraud by signing up for services. Like I said though, it's a grey area.
--
Weeeeeee

Kearnstd
Space Elf
Premium
join:2002-01-22
Mullica Hill, NJ
kudos:1
reply to ptbarnett

Re: Total BS...

unfortunately these agreements and the delays they cause for content leaving the US. Which in some cases can be weeks or months only continues to drive piracy.

I know this is why BBC-Worldwide started releasing Doctor Who the same day globally as it does in the UK. (International dateline permitting.)
--
[65 Arcanist]Filan(High Elf) Zone: Broadband Reports


SysOp

join:2001-04-18
Douglasville, GA
Reviews:
·MetroPCS

4 edits
reply to nekkidtruth

Re: Except its not piracy to use a VPN

No grey area. Company policy is not the same as usa or uk law. Hulu is prohibited by their agreements, not the consumer.

Not fraud since it's not criminal.

Example: I own the copyright to "sysop the movie". I own the server hosting the movie in the usa. I sell or rent the right for a consumer in the uk to stream or download the movie with or with out a proxy vpn. Consumer paid. Taxes paid. Fees paid. No laws have been broken. Using a proxy vpn did not prevent taxes, fees, royalties etc from being collected or paid. Nothing fraudulent.

The difference is Hulu has agreements with the copyright holders. Hulu is bound by those agreements.

The Antihero

join:2002-04-09
Enola, PA

1 recommendation

reply to ptbarnett

Re: Total BS...

It's like the region coding on a DVD: you are only supposed to
quote:
play it in the region for which it was manufacturers.
...which is pretty damn stupid too.


wizardry

@164.107.211.x

Yet another example of big content hobbling tech

There's currently a conflict between the business models of tech companies and content companies. Right now the tech industry is fairly competitive so startup and established companies alike have to deliver innovation or lower prices to keep up. When it comes to video entertainment that means coming up with services that let you watch whenever and wherever you want. Content companies have to be dragged kicking and screaming into licensing their wares out to new mediums. Movies studios tried to suppress TV and owned the theaters. VCRs were decried as the end of Hollywood ... until they became a big revenue source. DVDs were going to cause massive piracy with bit perfect copies. Once again they became a massive commercial success. The industry even equated "downloading" with copyright infringement until they saw the money from iTunes and Netflix.

SONY made incredible products. After they bought Columbia Pictures, they started adding all sorts of anti-features like DRM. In the short term you may be able to squeeze every last dollar out of customers by region-locking and encrypting their memory cards from themselves, but eventually people get tired of artificial limitations and choose not crippled hardware.

I don't mind content companies earning copyright protection. But with the way the FBI pursues copyright infringers you'd think they are an existential threat to the country. Same thing with the Department of Homeland Security shutting down commercially unauthorized Super Bowl streams by seizing domains without due process. If the MPAA has their way, PCs will be nothing more than vending machines with a credit card reader and a webcam so they can charge per viewer.


tshirt
Premium
join:2004-07-11
Snohomish, WA
kudos:5
Reviews:
·Comcast

1 recommendation

reply to SysOp

Re: Except its not piracy to use a VPN

However Hulu's terms of service " for US audience" are binding on the HULU purchaser of their service. This allows SAY Hulu UK, to buy UK rights and ONLY serve UK audiences, someday there may be a Hulu China, etc. if there is wide demand. otherwise individual programs MIGHT be liesnced via iTunes amazon etc.


test24kj54

@199.90.157.x
reply to ptbarnett

Re: Set up your own VPN.

Absolutely! I use Digital Ocean, for $5/month, a nice CentOS server with OpenVPN works very nicely!!!


nekkidtruth
YISMM
Premium
join:2002-05-20
London, ON
kudos:2
Reviews:
·WIND Mobile
·Rogers Hi-Speed
reply to SysOp

Re: Except its not piracy to use a VPN

Hulu currently only provides service to the U.S. and Japan (Canada is listed in certain places, but being Canadian I still have yet to be able to sign up and receive services without work arounds).

So basically what you're saying doesn't really make sense. In your example, you have given express permission and or licensed your content to another country. Hulu has not done this so you are breaking your terms of service by doing so. In order to break the terms of service, you are fraudulently providing incorrect information. It's certainly not criminal fraud, but it's still dishonest and against the terms of service. The chances that someone would go to court over it are slim to none, but that doesn't make it any less fraudulent.

Side note: Personally, I do this with Netflix and had intended to do so with Hulu. These copyright and licensing issues are absolutely silly.
--
Weeeeeee

Kearnstd
Space Elf
Premium
join:2002-01-22
Mullica Hill, NJ
kudos:1
reply to tshirt
Which makes it interesting when talking the free version of Hulu though. At that point you are just someone visiting a website rather than a customer bound by a purchase agreement.

I think we will start to see more of this VPN lockout though, the entertainment industry is going to focus on their regional lockouts for a few more years before they have no choice but to go global with everything.
--
[65 Arcanist]Filan(High Elf) Zone: Broadband Reports

elefante72

join:2010-12-03
East Amherst, NY
Reviews:
·Verizon FiOS
reply to nekkidtruth

Re: From a copyright point of view, it might make sense, but not privacy

Its like taking out a blowtorch and burning down the entire forest to kill one mound of ants.

Primitive, nothing less expected from the hammer heads over at Comcast.

So now the VPN companies will adapt and use IPV6 or cycle IP's. In the end they will make more money because it will cause them to spend more time playing whack a mole with the doorknobs that run these media companies.

How many IPV6 addresses are there out there

So again this is what the bully does? And now we want to let Comcast gobble up another bully. This is starting to look like a Marvel Comic...

TuxRaiderPen

join:2009-09-19

There is a solution from many VPN providers

There is a solution that many VPN providers provide.

The HUGE DOWNSIDE is, it is NOT SECURE, but does allow you to access these sites. Several make a big splash about it. I am not listing it to see how it plays out, and see if it continues to work. If so, problem solved. I doubt it would take make to fix the loop hole this approach takes..

This is just an escalation in the IP arms race, that will see tech go nuclear on sites like this. I would love to see how much revenue they loose over this, which won't happen..but maybe some one has a good best guess estimate. I am betting that a good 10-15% or more of their traffic is probably of foreign origin from persons PAYING $$$$ (SUCKERS! )

With various actions on one side you knew that an assault against VPN users was inevitable. Here is the first salvo.

Yet another reason I won't be, and have not been using this one. They just don't get it.
--
1311393600 - Back to Black.....Black....Black....

Want health care? Get a job! No to ACA! No to USNHS or USHIP or anything like them!
Job = Benefits = Health care, simple.


tshirt
Premium
join:2004-07-11
Snohomish, WA
kudos:5
Reviews:
·Comcast

1 edit
reply to Kearnstd

Re: Except its not piracy to use a VPN

It still has a ToS even if provided "FREE" just like you can offer copy of your book for free doesn't not give away your copyright or make it public domain. All IP is basically the same, You can offer unpaid usage, without losing the right to control HOW it is used. (which could protect you AND your actual ideas it some deliberately misrepresented what you said, or choose to claim credit (with or without direct payment to themselves) for your work.
And yes the IMPORTANT security uses of VPN's are going to be lost to the abuses by "the pirate community".

Pirates are not Robin Hood, they are entirely self-serving, greedy/cheapskates and the legal reactions to their abuse will once again lead to the loss/further eroding of a free and open internet.


Kilroy
Premium,MVM
join:2002-11-21
Saint Paul, MN
reply to wizardry

Re: Yet another example of big content hobbling tech

Actually more like another entity attempting to apply imaginary boundaries to a global network.


nekkidtruth
YISMM
Premium
join:2002-05-20
London, ON
kudos:2
Reviews:
·WIND Mobile
·Rogers Hi-Speed
said by Kilroy:

Actually more like another entity attempting to apply imaginary boundaries to a global network.

Couldn't have said it better myself. There are so many imaginary limitations put on the Internet around the world. Oh well, soon enough they'll all learn that it's far too late to "own" the Internet. Unless you're Google haha.
--
Weeeeeee


battleop

join:2005-09-28
00000
reply to elefante72

Re: From a copyright point of view, it might make sense, but not privacy

"How many IPV6 addresses are there out there "

Even with a huge number of IPv6 IPs it's still not that difficult for Hulu to block the VPN providers. The VPN providers can't keep going back to ARIN (or their Regional IP Provider) and asking for more IPs just because Hulu is blocking them.
--
I do not, have not, and will not work for AT&T/Comcast/Verizon/Charter or similar sized company.


battleop

join:2005-09-28
00000
reply to ptbarnett

Re: Set up your own VPN.

Doing it your way will never get whacked. I do something similar where I have firewalls in various Datacenters around the country I can connect to for things like this.
--
I do not, have not, and will not work for AT&T/Comcast/Verizon/Charter or similar sized company.

bigboy

join:2000-12-04
Palo Alto, CA
Yep. That's why a Slingbox is still probably the best bet for watching content internationally.


tshirt
Premium
join:2004-07-11
Snohomish, WA
kudos:5
Reviews:
·Comcast
reply to nekkidtruth

Re: Except its not piracy to use a VPN

It isn't up to Hulu to serve Canada, IF they don't have that license.
What you want is some other provider to buy the license for Canada, however because of attitudes like yours few investors are willing to do so, ie It cost too much for the potential PAYING audience, so that market is ignored Again your (group) actions are limiting your(Canadians) options.


tshirt
Premium
join:2004-07-11
Snohomish, WA
kudos:5
Reviews:
·Comcast

1 edit
reply to nekkidtruth
said by nekkidtruth:

Hulu has not done this so you are breaking your terms of service by doing so.

Please reread section 3 paragraph 2 of the HULU terms of service

"The Content. You may only access and view the Content personally and for a non-commercial purpose in compliance with these Terms. You may not either directly or through the use of any device, software, internet site, web-based service, or other means remove, alter, bypass, avoid, interfere with, or circumvent any copyright, trademark, or other proprietary notices marked on the Content or any digital rights management mechanism, device, or other content protection or access control measure associated with the Content including geo-filtering mechanisms.,
THERE is the EXPRESS limitation placed on use of the content.

You may not either directly or through the use of any device, software, internet site, web-based service, or other means copy, download, stream capture, reproduce, duplicate, archive, distribute, upload, publish, modify, translate, broadcast, perform, display, sell, transmit or retransmit the Content unless expressly permitted by Hulu in writing. You may not incorporate the Content into, or stream or retransmit the Content via, any hardware or software application or make it available via frames or in-line links unless expressly permitted by Hulu in writing. Furthermore, you may not create, recreate, distribute or advertise an index of any significant portion of the Content unless authorized by Hulu. You may not build a business utilizing the Content, whether or not for profit. The Content covered by these restrictions includes without limitation any text, graphics, layout, interface, logos, photographs, audio and video materials, and stills. In addition, you are strictly prohibited from creating derivative works or materials that otherwise are derived from or based on in any way the Content, including montages, mash-ups and similar videos, wallpaper, desktop themes, greeting cards, and merchandise, unless it is expressly permitted by Hulu in writing. This prohibition applies even if you intend to give away the derivative materials free of charge.


nekkidtruth
YISMM
Premium
join:2002-05-20
London, ON
kudos:2
Reviews:
·WIND Mobile
·Rogers Hi-Speed

1 edit
reply to tshirt
Biggest load I've ever heard. You have thousands of Canadians who throw their money at a service that isn't offered, yet there's no money to be made? Right, that makes total sense.

In case you missed the part where I pay, regardless whether it's through a workaround or bypass of their silly regional limitations, I'm still paying. Are you suggesting I wouldn't pay if it was offered without those limitations? *rolls eyes*
--
Weeeeeee


nekkidtruth
YISMM
Premium
join:2002-05-20
London, ON
kudos:2
reply to tshirt
What you are posting proves what I'm saying. Not entirely sure what exactly it is you're trying to say. Perhaps you should be more clear.
--
Weeeeeee