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Comments on news posted 2014-07-22 12:49:53: After spending millions of dollars over countless years on plans to implement "three strikes" anti-piracy measures on the ISP level, the UK government has finally come to the conslusion that having ISPs play content nanny does little to deter piracy. ..



Noah Vail
Son made my Avatar
Premium
join:2004-12-10
SouthAmerica
kudos:3

Big Entertainment's purchased police force is a little less forceful

All that lobby money **AA spent to buy a Gov and what did it get them?


maartena
Elmo
Premium
join:2002-05-10
Orange, CA
kudos:4

3 recommendations

Piracy is unstoppable.

It's unstoppable. Way back in the day in 1996 I was one of the first people with a "cable modem" as they were trialing in my town. It was a system connected to a serial port, and thus limited to one computer and at 115200bps. But it was on 24/7, and everyone in town was getting it.

Within weeks of it being launched - and mind you this is years before P2P really started - most people had their own FTP servers, and people exchanged logins. At that time, people were really hot in the exchanging of so called "warez CD's", you could buy those off of people for like $10, and they would contain all new games, software. MP3 and DivX weren't quite there yet at that time, so it was really limited to software. Next to FTP servers, a channel on IRC was formed with our town name. Next to just chatting it up (Internet was so new in those days) people could announce their new finds that they had put on their FTP servers.

The speeds weren't fantastic (115kbps = 10 Kbyte/s roughly), it was really just 3x dialup speed, but uploads/downloads would happen overnight, and software and games weren't as big as they are now either. In those 3-4 years, pretty much till 2000 when P2P things like napster started showing up, followed by Kazaa, eDonkey and finally Bittorrent.... that is how we shared our stuff. I had an FTP client with probably about 40, 50 sites from city friends/new online friends and we downloaded stuff from eachother overnight. Within a year or 2, the "warez CD" that was traded in schools and offices, were replaced by FTP on the internet, and we all know where it took off from there.

The point that I am trying to make is.... People have always been pirating, from dubbing cassettes in the 1980s (including those commodore 64 cassettes) all the way up to Bittorrent now. The Internet just made it a lot easier, and a lot faster. Where we with our little FTP servers saw something spread across town in about a week or so, from FTP server to FTP server, etc, etc... now it takes minutes to download a movie.

It has grown to such an extend it really is unstoppable. The only thing ISP's and the law can do is indeed register an IP address, and warn the owner of that IP address that they are UPLOADING content. In many countries, the DOWNLOADING of material is actually considered legal as part of "home copy" laws, AS LONG as you already legally own the movie in question, ergo you have paid for it, and are now just trying to get a copy for the laptop. That isn't the law in the USA mind you, but in some countries it is and/or was. It's impossible to prove whether you own the movie though based on downloading, but UPLOADING is always illegal in any circumstance, as the countries with home copy laws do prohibit it from being distributed. But what can a ISP do? They can send warning letters 3 times, but then what? Do they really want to kick a customer to the curb?

Recent years have seen a fair number of people being sued for illegal uploading or downloading, and when looked at the finer details, there have been quite a few cases where the router was open and the owner was an elderly lady with no knowledge of P2P, or a coffee shop owner offering free WiFi access, or someone with a hacked/tampered with router etc.... on a few occasions the media industry really embarrassed themselves in going after people that had really downloaded one or two movies, and ended up being a single mother with children living on low income that wanted to show the kids a family friendly movie and couldn't afford it. Breaking the law she still was, but it doesn't make for very good press against piracy.

The latest is the blocking of websites like the Pirate bay. Nice, but sites like that probably already have an unused domain as backup, registered under a fake name, that can be transferred on a moments notice. Pirate bay is on a .se domain name now, but could probably get a .sx or .sk or .cc domain in minutes and re-launch. or re-launch under a completely different name by just giving the underlying code to someone else. And the reality is that there are hundreds of websites like that, and on top of that probably hundreds more private trackers.

The only thing that is working..... is making legal content affordable. Music piracy has dropped because of iTunes. And Netflix makes pirating older movies/tv series a thing of the past.

But even if they somehow manage to ban Bittorrent.... there are already options for completely encrypted forms of P2P where the uploader cannot be revealed as the data travels through a series of encrypted nodes, and the data uploaded is encrypted as well. These systems aren't particular popular right now, because very few people use it, and therefore the speed is very slow. But outlaw Bittorrent, and people will massively move to tor-based P2P and other encryption solutions.

The "next big thing" in P2P is already coded somewhere.

In short: Piracy is unstoppable. Don't try to stop it by force, instead try to minimize it by offering decent legal options. Options that allow you to take a copy for the laptop, and one for the dvd player in the car, and one for the iPad to watch on the airplane.... without being forced into DRM that cripples and limits your ability to use your legally purchased media.

In even shorter: If you can't beat them, join them and still make money.

--
"I reject your reality and substitute my own!"

78036364

join:2014-05-06
USA

now get rid of the porn ban

that's just as ineffective


SmilingBob

join:2013-09-23
League City, TX
Reviews:
·DSL EXTREME

1 recommendation

reply to maartena

Re: Piracy is unstoppable.

said by maartena:

Options that allow you to take a copy for the laptop, and one for the dvd player in the car, and one for the iPad to watch on the airplane.... without being forced into DRM that cripples and limits your ability to use your legally purchased media.

The last part of your quote is what really gets me - slapping DRM on my legally purchased blurays and dvds and then making it illegal to break the encryption, thus making it impossible for me to copy my own property for personal use. I don't need to purchase an additional digital copy for the htpc, a dvd for suv, or a mp4 for my ipad. I've got a perfectly good digital copy on my bluray that can formatted into any other digital file for any device I'd like to use, thanks.


TOPDAWG
Premium
join:2005-04-27
Calgary, AB
kudos:3

1 recommendation

The whole warning screen we will fine and send you to jail pisses me off. I mean WTF how about a screen saying thank you for buying our product.

Also stop with the god damn 30 trailers BS.


karlmarx

join:2006-09-18
Chicago, IL
You wouldn't steal a handbag.
You wouldn't steal a car.
You wouldn't steal a baby.
You wouldn't shoot a policeman, and then steal his helmet.
You wouldn't go the the toilet in his helmet, and then send it to his grieving widow, and then steal it again.
Downloading films is stealing, if you do it, you WILL face the consequences
The IT Crowd
--
The best way to defeat religion it to ignore it. Look at Ra/Thor/Zeus, they all thought they were forever.


Jcink

join:2005-12-19
none
reply to maartena
A great post.

The worst thing these days is that I've noticed regression when it comes to Netflix.

It does make pirating a lot of things a thing of the past, but not when they keep gutting it of content. In just the last 2 years they've removed thousands of movies and they expire out TV shows too.

I know it's all about contracts, usually because the owner of the content wants more money and so they can't afford it anymore. But not having it on there just encourages piracy rather than them getting paid anything at all for it. These companies still, even now, have not learned.


cork1958
Cork
Premium
join:2000-02-26

Someday, maybe

Someday, maybe, the RIAA and MPAA will learn what century we're living in.

Doubtful, but just maybe?
--
The Firefox alternative.
»www.mozilla.org/projects/seamonk ··· amonkey/

Dan_in_FL

join:2010-03-23
Lake Worth, FL
reply to maartena

Re: Piracy is unstoppable.

quote:
Within weeks of it being launched - and mind you this is years before P2P really started - most people had their own FTP servers, and people exchanged logins. At that time, people were really hot in the exchanging of so called "warez CD's", you could buy those off of people for like $10, and they would contain all new games, software. MP3 and DivX weren't quite there yet at that time, so it was really limited to software. Next to FTP servers, a channel on IRC was formed with our town name.
Oh gosh.....the nostalgia. FTP, IRC, Warez...

quote:
The speeds weren't fantastic (115kbps = 10 Kbyte/s roughly), it was really just 3x dialup speed,
As someone who saved money from mowing lawns to go from 28.8K to 33.6K, 115 would have been amazing. I remember when I learned you could peer 2 dialup connections, and late at night I would use both the 'internet' phone line and our regular house line together and get 7.5 Kbytes/sec. I was a god among men. Didn't see cable internet until college.


el_huason

@108.38.68.x
reply to cork1958

Re: Someday, maybe

Don't count on it. By the time the media corps realize this, it will be too little too late (Not that it matters much to me anyway, I abandoned mainstream entertainment a long time ago ).

"Only two kinds of human beings can be trusted - dead and extinct. All others must be avoided at all costs" me.

toejam

join:2013-06-14
San Jose, CA
reply to maartena

Re: Piracy is unstoppable.

More options and reduced prices are their best weapons.

BTW, I liked your Yoda like comment "Breaking the law she still was.."

toejam

join:2013-06-14
San Jose, CA
reply to Jcink
Exactly! Why cant they work out some consignment type of business. Probably due to some lame greedy exec looking for the short term gains.


elios

join:2005-11-15
Springfield, MO
reply to maartena
we got cable modem in 97 ish in Maryland via @Home
for the first 2 years it was uncapped 1MB/s download rates where the norm
also ours connected via 10Base ethernet
later it was capped to 4Mbps down and 1Mbps up
but yea the wild west days of FTP, IRC, and USENET


Soho97UK
Premium
join:2004-08-18
UK
kudos:1

Torrent Freak has a more realistic article ...

THE UK DID *NOT* JUST DECRIMINALIZE FILE-SHARING


BIGMIKE
Premium
join:2002-06-07
Blythe, CA
reply to karlmarx

Re: Piracy is unstoppable.

a : the act of stealing; specifically : the felonious taking and removing of personal property with intent to deprive the rightful owner of it