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Comments on news posted 2008-03-04 10:44:54: A few weeks ago RIAA President Cary Sherman, when he wasn't suggesting that AV software should scan for pirated material, hinted that there would be less piracy if users simply knew what they were doing was illegal. ..

page: 1 · 2 · next

DrModem
Trust Your Doctor
Premium
join:2006-10-19
USA
kudos:1

Funded By Entertainment Industry Lawyers

Rigged? Maybe.

Trustworthy? Probably not.

gaforces
United We Stand, Divided We Fall

join:2002-04-07
Santa Cruz, CA

Re: Funded By Entertainment Industry Lawyers

Here is what I posted in another thread: >> »Warnings from ISP

ISP's have absolutely no business looking at files people download.
If it's a matter of national security and they have a warrant, then they should look at communications, not downloaded files. That is violation of privacy, the govt doesn't need to be looking at my porn for national security.
--
Vista ~ Less functional every day!
jc100

join:2002-04-10

Re: Funded By Entertainment Industry Lawyers

I'll tell you what I tell everyone who does a study. 99 percent of facts are made up.

nekkidtruth
YISMM
Premium
join:2002-05-20
London, ON
kudos:2
Reviews:
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Re: Funded By Entertainment Industry Lawyers

said by jc100:

I'll tell you what I tell everyone who does a study. 99 percent of statistics are made up.
Fixed it for you.

Technically a "fact" isn't made up
--
Weeeeeee

Morac
Cat god

join:2001-08-30
Riverside, NJ
kudos:1
Reviews:
·Comcast

2 recommendations

It would work, but not for the reasons given

quote:
hinted that there would be less piracy if users simply knew what they were doing was illegal
I'm pretty sure most people at this point know downloading pirated material is illegal, the same way that people know speeding is illegal. They do both anyway because the gains outweight the risk of being caught.

People would stop downloading pirated material if they knew their ISP was watching them, not because they didn't know what they were doing was illegal, but for the same reason people don't speed in front of cops. At that point, the risk of getting caught way outweighs any possible gains.
--

The Comcast Disney Avatar has been retired.
MyDogHsFleas
Premium
join:2007-08-15
Austin, TX
kudos:5

Re: It would work, but not for the reasons given

said by Morac:

I'm pretty sure most people at this point know downloading pirated material is illegal, the same way that people know speeding is illegal.
Actually I rather doubt that. There is nothing in the online experience that tells them this. So how would they know?

From personal experience with my family and friends, I know that people are surprised when I tell them that downloading songs and videos for free is illegal and leaves them vulnerable to being sued.

The usual response is something like "Huh? So-and-so told me about this great website, all I had to do was click a few times and it was downloading. It told me I needed to share to get better downloads so I loaded some of my CDs onto it. I bought them, so I can do anything I want with them."

I actually had several arguments with my daughter who was using (I think) LimeWire. She finally took it off but was really angry at me. Then, her friend's sister got sued by the RIAA. When she told me, the look on her face was priceless. She looked at me like, "Wow! My Dad was actually right! And I thought I knew everything!"

Morac
Cat god

join:2001-08-30
Riverside, NJ
kudos:1

Re: It would work, but not for the reasons given

I'll agree that some people are still unaware, but with the amount of commercials the **AA is putting out (eg: "you wouldn't steal a car..."), that number is going down.

Millenniumle

join:2007-11-11
Fredonia, NY

...

I agree.

It's pretty much a free for all right now, and may continue to be even with monitoring, provided transfers are encrypted. Maybe ISP's will serve up the warnings based on blacklisted source IP or protocol rather than actual content. Identifying the actual content, its copyright, and whether the transfer is with or without permission seems a virtually impossible task even without encryption. It seems that at best an ISP could identify possible copyright violation activity.

Again, I think you are exactly right. Most won't proceed if they get hit with a warning. Suddenly they'd feel they are going to get into trouble if they proceed. Of course, if it turns out that ISP's really aren't able to identify actual violations, which it would seem difficult to do 'on mass,' then the warnings could quickly gain a reputation as being meaningless.

Corehhi

join:2002-01-28
Bluffton, SC

Re: It would work, but not for the reasons given

Who knows what horrible outcome might happen. I've already had problems with software I bought over copy right crap.

TamaraB
Question The Current Paradigm
Premium
join:2000-11-08
Da Bronx
Reviews:
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1 recommendation

How would they know?

How can an ISP know that the contents of a data stream is copyrighted material or not? Isn't this sort of impossible to determine? Encrypted packets arriving at some location from diverse sources?

Unless the data was totally intercepted, reconstructed, decrypted, and then compared to a copyrighted source, there is no way to know what the content is.

Bob

--
Motor Vessel - Tamara B.
43' Long-Range Trawler
Cape Elizebeth ME.
See her Here.

AlexNYC

join:2001-06-02
Edwards, CO

Re: How would they know?

That's the best comment in the entire thread. Think about this, Comcast is trying to block torrent traffic, but are not particularly successful because once the data is encrypted and the default port is changed they don't know what exactly it is. Sure, they suspect and can try to guess but that is not good enough.

TamaraB
Question The Current Paradigm
Premium
join:2000-11-08
Da Bronx

Re: How would they know?


Not to mention the fact, that to reverse-engineer the encryption is in itself a violation of the DCMA.

jt50

@comcast.net
get you facts straigh. comcast does not block it and slow it down so it does not bottle neck there network. it comcast really wanted to block it they would. i still dont like the fact comcast slows down torrent traffic.

AlexNYC

join:2001-06-02
Edwards, CO

Re: How would they know?

How do you think I know this? Look at my profile, I use Comcast. No, they don't "just slow it down". They block seeding by inserting a RST Flag, which terminates the connection. Encrypting solves this problem. Do a DSLR search on Comcast and read a little before you make dumb statements.

Jason Levine
Premium
join:2001-07-13
USA

1 recommendation

Not only copyrighted, but how would they know that the transfer wasn't approved by the copyright owners? For example, I used BitTorrent last night to download the first part of Trent Reznor's new album titled Ghost. This is copyrighted music, so should the ISP block it or warn me that I'm engaged in illegal activity?

No, since Trent himself (or at least someone with technical knowledge that Trent employed) put that music on the P2P networks. (See: »NIN Embraces P2P Again, Offers Free Music ) There is no way for an ISP to keep track of which music downloads are approved by the copyright holders and which aren't approved.
--
-Jason Levine
Support a children's charity. Buy a calendar. Shooting For A Cause
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FFH
Premium
join:2002-03-03
Tavistock NJ
kudos:5

1 edit

I like France's proposed policy

»arstechnica.com/news.ars/post/20···ack.html

The French government is pressing ahead with plans to cut off the Internet access for those caught sharing files via P2P. Under a plan announced last November by President Nicolas Sarkozy, those caught sharing copyrighted content via P2P would have their Internet access cut off under a three-strikes-and-you're-offline scheme.

Jean Berbinau, general secretary of French regulatory body Autorité de Régulation des Mesures Techniques (Regulatory Authority for Technical Measures), said that legislation enacting Sarkozy's plan should be passed by summer.
We should pass a similar law in the US. The UK and Australia are also looking at passing a similar law as well.
--
My BLOG .. .. Internet News .. .. My Web Page
lesopp

join:2001-06-27
Land O Lakes, FL

I don't like France's proposed policy

No we shouldn't. Its too draconian and prone to errors.

What happens when a person mistakenly ends up on the "No Surf List"?

FFH
Premium
join:2002-03-03
Tavistock NJ
kudos:5

Re: I don't like France's proposed policy

said by lesopp:

No we shouldn't. Its too draconian and prone to errors.

What happens when a person mistakenly ends up on the "No Surf List"?
Once - maybe a mistake; twice - less chance of an error; three times and you have been caught with very little chance of error.
--
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woody7
Premium
join:2000-10-13
Torrance, CA

Re: I don't like France's proposed policy

So the riaa never makes mistakes? Do they ever apologize? So we condemn the whole system because of alleged pirates? the figure that we/I never hear is how many people use the internet/p2p and don't illegally share versus how many use it legally and don't share illegally? the point I am making is that a vast majority of the uses don't file share "illegally" and it would be affecting them equally.Kind of like making people jump through the hoops to own a gun, when that hasn't really reduced "illegal" gun usage one iota. Peace
--
BlooMe

dadkins
Can you do Blu?
Premium,MVM
join:2003-09-26
Hercules, CA
kudos:18

2 recommendations

What if YOU end up getting chastised for something because of an error?

You send a clip of son/daughter(hypothetically) and it flags you as a Pirate... are you going to be so gung-ho about it then?

That would be *YOUR* Strike One.

Say you blow that off and try it again... Flag #2 - Strike #2... yeah, real good idea, huh?

You inadvertantly forget and send another... BOOT!

Now, my friend, *YOU* are kicked offline and labeled a pirate. Sound tasty?

*NO* ISP should be a cop!
What's next?
Illegal to let you borrow a DVD?
--
Think outside the Fox... Opera

FFH
Premium
join:2002-03-03
Tavistock NJ
kudos:5

Re: I don't like France's proposed policy

said by dadkins:

*NO* ISP should be a cop!
Well then who should be the cop, in your opinion?

Because god knows one is needed, given all the criminals on the internet.
--
My BLOG .. .. Internet News .. .. My Web Page
SilverSurfer1

join:2007-08-19

Re: I don't like France's proposed policy

said by FFH:

Well then who should be the cop, in your opinion?

Because god knows one is needed, given all the criminals on the internet.
We need "cops" to patrol the Internet the same way we need law enforcement to patrol Times Square and strip search everyone they stumble across just to "make sure" nobody is carrying/doing anything "illegal."

dadkins
Can you do Blu?
Premium,MVM
join:2003-09-26
Hercules, CA
kudos:18
Uhm... I can't answer that, can you?
Is Caltrans the cops that write you a ticket for speeding on the roads they build and maintain? No!

Should the ISP that builds and maintains the line you & I use be the cops? No!
--
Think outside the Fox... Opera

FFH
Premium
join:2002-03-03
Tavistock NJ
kudos:5

Re: I don't like France's proposed policy

said by dadkins:

Uhm... I can't answer that, can you?
Is Caltrans the cops that write you a ticket for speeding on the roads they build and maintain? No!

Should the ISP that builds and maintains the line you & I use be the cops? No!
NYC, Philadelphia, etc all have their own transit cops and railroads have their own railroad cops(paid by the railroads). Why shouldn't ISPs have their own internet cops?
--
My BLOG .. .. Internet News .. .. My Web Page

dadkins
Can you do Blu?
Premium,MVM
join:2003-09-26
Hercules, CA
kudos:18

1 recommendation

Re: I don't like France's proposed policy

Ok, but they themselves are not the cops. See the difference here?

Seeing as it is not the ISPs bitching about the illegal transfers of material(s), then it should not be the ISPs (or you and I) footing the bill for police type services.

Are you willing to have more restrictions applied to your connection *AND* pay more each month so some private company/entity can dictate what the ISPs should do?

Fuck that!
--
Think outside the Fox... Opera

nipseyrussel
Nipsey Russell, yo

join:2002-02-22
Philadelphia, PA

1 recommendation

railroads hire transit cops because (a) if they dont their customers are in danger and are less likely to ride -thus they would lose customers and (b) they are protecting the actual physical safety of their customers

with respect to (a) the ISPs stand to lose customers if they police content, and re (b) no one is going to get stabbed or raped in kazaa like they might on the subway.

here we have a situation where most of the ISPs and their customers have no desire to have themselves policed, so let them keep up their dumass lawsuits

Jason Levine
Premium
join:2001-07-13
USA

1 recommendation

Re: I don't like France's proposed policy

Not to mention that filtering content opens ISPs up to liability. No filter is going to be 100% perfect. If they block some copyrighted material from being transferred without permission, but don't block others, then they might be sued by the owners of the non-filtered items. If they don't filter at all, they can claim Common Carrier and are shielded from being sued.

81399672
Premium
join:2006-05-17
Los Angeles, CA
kudos:2
said by FFH:

said by dadkins:

Uhm... I can't answer that, can you?
Is Caltrans the cops that write you a ticket for speeding on the roads they build and maintain? No!

Should the ISP that builds and maintains the line you & I use be the cops? No!
NYC, Philadelphia, etc all have their own transit cops and railroads have their own railroad cops(paid by the railroads). Why shouldn't ISPs have their own internet cops?
You talking about government, isp is not government. RIAA soon will be out of existence, as they refuse to adapt to new reality. Make all songs cheap to download, say 50c and it will not worth for people to pirate. Till then people will pirate and their is nothing RIAA can do about it
vannyx
Premium
join:2003-07-07
Bronx, NY

Re: I don't like France's proposed policy

All i can say is amazing, when people complain about something, like isps blocking stuff and ask for some kind of regular from the government to stop it these guys come out o the wood work and argue that the free market should decided , let the free market handle it, if you dont like it dont subscribe to that isp, these are citizens asking for help from the government to fix something they feel will become a problem. So now we have a private entity that wants another private entity to impose restrictions and to violate there customers privacy for this private entities gain. So why dont i see anyone saying that the free market should decide this, but guess what the free market has decided this. According to the RIAA/MPAA they are loosing sales, which if this is true then the free market has chosen not to support your outdated model, so stop trying to force 3rd parties to bend to your will. ( dont get started on this whole piracy thing). If you feel someone is stealing from you then go through the due process and charge them a reasonable fee for the violation and actually prove your case. The market has spoken now evolve or die.

Jason Levine
Premium
join:2001-07-13
USA

2 recommendations

I'm reaching here, but maybe.... the police?

It's their jobs to track down criminals (be they online or offline) and prosecute them.

When it comes to copyright offenses, however, these are civil offenses, not criminal ones. (At least until the MPAA/RIAA push through legislation making them criminal cases.) This means that the copyright holder has to file suit themselves against the copyright violator. Sometimes this takes the form of a John Doe lawsuit until the violator's identity can be determined (or until the copyright holder has proven to a judge that they have enough of a case to pierce the accused's privacy).

The problem is that the RIAA is lazy. They don't want to file their lawsuits separately in the correct jurisdiction. They just want to file a huge batch of them all at once (as if they were related). They don't want to *actually* sue the person, just strong-arm them into a highly one-sided settlement. And they don't want to keep an eye out for copyright violators themselves, they want the ISPs to do their job for them.
--
-Jason Levine
Support a children's charity. Buy a calendar. Shooting For A Cause
Jason's Toolbox | PCQandA.com

81399672
Premium
join:2006-05-17
Los Angeles, CA
kudos:2
said by FFH:

said by dadkins:

*NO* ISP should be a cop!
Well then who should be the cop, in your opinion?

Because god knows one is needed, given all the criminals on the internet.
We don't need cops on the internet. When music industry start releasing music that is worth to buy, people will start buying. Till then pirating will continue and regardless of what you try it will not stop it.

•••••••

NormanS
I gave her time to steal my mind away
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San Jose, CA
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said by FFH:

Well then who should be the cop, in your opinion?
The F.B.I.? Or your state police? We already have cops, and they have rules, regulations, and procedures to follow to act on complaints. Let them do it. And pass the costs on to the taxpayers as they do it. Yeah; levy an Internet tax to pay for Internet cops. That should do it.
--
Norman
~Oh Lord, why have you come
~To Konnyu, with the Lion and the Drum
Expand your moderator at work

Jason Levine
Premium
join:2001-07-13
USA

1 recommendation

I could definitely see this happening.

E-mail a photo to your family whose name raises copyright flags: Strike #1

Tech Support Response: "We're sorry about that. It must have been a false positive. Unfortunately, we're unable to remove strikes, but don't worry, they'll expire on their own soon enough."

Short while later, e-mail a clip of your child singing a nursery rhyme. Raises flags for being an MP3: Strike #2

Tech Support Response: "There definitely isn't a bug in our systems. Are you sure you didn't share anything off of a P2P network? We can't reverse this otherwise all pirates would claim innocence. Just be more careful what you do next time."

Not too long after that, browsing a website triggers an edge case in the filters and you get Strike #3. This time Tech Support immediately, upon seeing your account, sends you over to the ISP's new Copyright Education and Protection division which instructs you that you can have your connectivity back if you take some courses on why copyright protection is essential, sign documents confirming that you are a pirate, and pay a $100 fine.
--
-Jason Levine
Support a children's charity. Buy a calendar. Shooting For A Cause
Jason's Toolbox | PCQandA.com

slimpickinz

join:2003-11-29
Conyers, GA
Brilliant again TK....
Let the Govt handle it!

scrummie02
Bentley
Premium
join:2004-04-16
Arlington, VA
Reviews:
·Verizon FiOS

Re: I like France's proposed policy

And who would enforce this, the government? Are you going to use tax money to create a Internet Copyright Infringement Department branch of the government that keeps tabs on users and how they've broken copyright restrictions?
They hand out a "no internet for this person" to all of the ISP's based on what some entertainment company tells them? Of course the RIAA and MPAA have been shown to be more wrong then correct in their lawsuits so far. Blindly enforcing this a piece of legislation this stupid would result in either a lot of people with internet or basically the formation of some sort of government spying program.

Sorry, I'd rather use my tax money elsewhere, not using it to enforce some draconian law because some 16 year old kid wants to download the latest Timbaland a
--
"The democracy will cease to exist when you take away from those who are willing to work and give to those who would not. " - Thomas Jefferson
Expand your moderator at work

Acuity

join:2002-06-22
Londonderry, NH

Re: I like France's proposed policy

I would be leery about something such as this.

Most end-users aren't intelligent enough to secure their wireless access points let alone use good passwords. I don't believe the best way to get people into the 21st century is by suing them or taking away their access. I suspect that a large number of these lawsuits with the RIAA suing old people are due to neighbors jumping on their wireless access points.

A policy such as that would be decremental towards the advancement of the internet and scare non tech savvy people away from it entirely. I'm sure the wise have already established connections and made friends in Canada to set up proxy servers for free reign downloading where it was ruled legal in their court system.
MASantangelo
Premium
join:2004-07-19
Pittstown, NJ

Yeah. Right.

Yeah. Right. Do you honestly think we don't know?

We don't care. Stop charging outrageous prices, forcing DRM down our throats, and giving us sub-par quality audio and video and maybe we'll stop. Maybe.

It's a sad day when I have to watch what CDs I buy just in case it's not usable inside a CD player (I wish I had a link to the article about this, can't seem to dig it up).

It's a sad day when I have to turn to a pirated version of a movie to get one without insinuations that I'm a pirate or that I'm going to pirate it (notice how it's the first thing people remove when they rip a movie).

And it's a VERY sad day when consumers are treated like pirates before doing anything.

It's also sad when companies don't create new material, but instead add on to old material a gajillion times (I'm looking at you Spiderman, with your version 1, 2, etc etc).

Do these justify piracy? No.

Are they part of the reason it exists? Yes.
--
Ramblings Of A Gamer

cableties
Premium
join:2005-01-27

It's factored in their P/L !!!

Please.

This is the classic, passing the buck. Plus, software companies pay into the BSA and SIIA(.net) and that money could be alloted to better programming and reduced software cost.

Instead, they want to police and ostracize the very tech that opened the door for not only piracy (which, btw, has been around for centuries) but also for new business models. Failure of the music industry to be forward thinking is too bad.

And putting filters up is analogous to the Cold War (no one wins but those that profit off the parts and underpinnings).
We, the end-user, foot the bill.

Now, for some coffee...

dellsweig
Extreme Aerobatics
Premium,MVM
join:2003-12-10
Campbell Hall, NY
kudos:1

any wonder

Any wonder why 75% of teens would stop pirating if warned by ISP - Mom and Dad would flip out if such a warning came in and cut off Internet access for the teen - The kid lives for the free internet access - loosing it would be paramount to death

Keyboard

@seovec.org

Piracy

Well Looks at microsoft they have an momoply on the software side.Yeah we have free browsers but 8 out of 10 websites will not support them, forcing you to buy Microsoft products. Don't get me wrong yes a small fee should be paid, but, VISTA for instance, why have so many versions ... just to get more of your money for more bells and whistles. If people would stop using the internet to download went back to buying, Then what would the ISP people say? They would whine they weren't making money for the airtime people use. The government allowed the Internet to get to big to quick to start gonverning it now. It all comes back to a statement that say's Human knowledge belongs to the Human's. not to a bunch of proffiteering people. Start lowering prices and it would combat the downloading piracy. A standard DVD cost 20 cents but charge $20-20 dollars for them, how much money do you need?
axus

join:2001-06-18
Washington, DC
Reviews:
·Comcast

DMCA warnings

I think they are pretty effective. I don't know anyone who's recieved one but I had a friend in college who was warned about an FTP site he was running, and he stopped.

Ideally internet copyright violations should be about the level of a speeding ticket. Speeding is something potentially harmful, that doesn't hurt people in most instances, but statistically will lead to more deaths.
zod5000

join:2003-10-21
Victoria, BC
Reviews:
·Shaw

Not effective if users know they'res no punishment.

If users know (and the ISP has said outright) that they are just warning, and that there is no punishment. I don't think they'd be nearly as effective, as if they just started sending them out without ever telling anyone what they were about it.

If people know the letter is full of hot air, it'll get deleted. If people know nothing of these letters, they might get a little scared.
theraweness

join:2007-12-14
4906

1 recommendation

Government

The government needs to worry more about closing the borders,health care, and the war just to name a few.

yolarry

join:2007-12-29
Creston, WV

Re: Government

This is about UK not US.

Youre Mother

@sbcglobal.net

You Better Hurry! Download as much crap as you can

Man, It's the same story every few decades, before it was pirating VHS and the 'black box', this shit is like war, it's never going to go away. Some genius will figure out how to bust the buster and download pirated material anyway. I'm surprised that LimeWire is still around for kids that don't how to move their shit off the shared folder and off the working HDD and put it off the network off and on and off and on...101010101010 this old binary technology is like the oil industry and it will fail and the Pirate will win and win and win again... i'am changing my ISP!

rodriro

join:2007-05-21
Palo Alto, CA
Man, It's the same story every few decades, before it was pirating VHS and the 'black box', this shit is like war, it's never going to go away. Some genius will figure out how to bust the buster and download pirated material anyway. I'm surprised that LimeWire is still around for kids that don't how to move their shit off the shared folder and off the working HDD and put it off the network off and on and off and on...101010101010 this old binary technology is like the oil industry and it will fail and the Pirate will win... and win and win again... i'am changing my ISP!

Glaice
Brutal Video Vault
Premium
join:2002-10-01
North Babylon, NY

Re: You Better Hurry! Download as much crap as you can

Or find alternate places to "obtain" media

devilshaven

@rogers.com

1 recommendation

nice, all the piracy hurting business, ohh i will cry for the music industry, so sad, waahh wahh

»www.reuters.com/article/MediaMar···20061129

that's just a sample of what the real picture is
what they really fail to account is most of the people who "pirate" music, if they couldn't pirate they wouldn't buy music anyway, and those who use to buy music still do, same goes for the other wyners, movie, and software companies

pirating has been here long before the INTERNET, even today u can go to your local flee market and get movies, and music for cheap, no internet needed.

hey if you are lucky the flee market neer you might even have real copies, that just happned to fall from the truck and they where lucky enough to pick them up before any one noticed
TheMG
Premium
join:2007-09-04
Canada
kudos:3
Reviews:
·NorthWest Tel
...or at least the most effective one:

Content at REASONABLE prices that people are willing to pay for!!!

$20 for a CD, $30 for a DVD... seriously, how can they (record labels and movie studios) expect the average person to afford regularly buying music/movies at those prices? It's ridiculous.

Sure, you have those people that will NEVER pay for the stuff. But I'm sure a significant amount of people right now who pirate content would no longer if the prices were reasonable.

I myself wouldn't mind paying $5 for an album or $10 for a movie. But at the current prices NO WAY!

•••

thewordis

@verizon.net
no

TI POIL

join:2006-03-05
Toronto, ON
There's noway that would work, could you imagine all the tracking and paperwork they will have to do?? complaints,false positive, customer service reps. etc... It would be way to much work for such little results.

I give it 5 years or less.

Labels and distributors as we know them today=gone
MPAA RIAA etc and all the other gansters=GOOOONNNNE

Businessman like Trent Reznor will be the victor in that battle.Right time at the right place.
--
« C’est les meilleures saucisses à hot-dog 100% naturel. Pas de gras trans, pas d’OGM, pas de cholestérol, pas de viande. »

CBLMorphis

join:2001-02-25
Riverside, CA
Topic says it all,

Oh the FBI // RIAA // MPAA wants us, and our monies, YAH's.

No No I wont go, they can't make me, or can they? NAZI AKA US = Germeny, Gov = Hitler.
--
Like My DSL!!!

elderrain
Im from Cuba MANG
Premium
join:2004-07-08
Massena, NY
I believe what i read.When people stop going to this site

»www.endoftheinternet.com/
--
My Blog Website...
»macbloghaus.wordpress.com/
davecamaro

join:2008-03-05
Palatine, IL
It will never happen. There are too many local, state and country boundries. No one will agree on crime/punishment. The cost to hire an internet cop would be very high since they would actually have to know what they are doing and not just pull people over and eat donuts. This is money better spent combating terrorism or the next school shooting(which would probably go up after some kid gets a 25k fine for downloading songs. I really could see some teen freaking out and killing over this).
Not too mention every ISP would have to upgrade all their core juniper and cisco gear so that it could do all the content filtering. Then to go through all the content that creates hit would be a boring thankless job. Lets say you do find a pirate and they are downloading music in China. Chances are China will just give you the finger and say too bad.
BTW the French are facist bastards and the day the world takes their lead on a policy will be a dark day indeed