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Comments on news posted 2008-04-07 13:06:29: When Verizon comes to install FiOS, we try to run their installers over with our cars for digging up our azaleas. When AT&T comes to install VDSL and IPTV, we're annoyed by the fact that they need to place a massive box in front of our homes. ..

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gaforces
United We Stand, Divided We Fall

join:2002-04-07
Santa Cruz, CA
reply to cooperaaaron

Re: They should simply.....

Tree roots cause problems and if they did plant them, they would be liable for damages.

mglunt

join:2001-09-10
Fredericksburg, VA
reply to PhoenixDown

Re: I want 100/100

said by PhoenixDown:

but I'd be pretty upset too if a company dumped 2 refrigerator sized boxes in the middle of my front yard...
I would be too. If there is a way to hide the box, but the company wants to save the money that would cost, I'd be pissed. I take pride in how my property looks.. I don't need a 5-6 foot tall metal cabinet out front. Thankfully, FIOS runs everything underground (at least where I am). The only thing I see in my back yard is a 3'x2' (or so) lid on a buried box. ...and the lid is green so it blends in with the grass.


GemSnake
Premium
join:2000-10-19
3rd layer

1 edit

1 recommendation

reply to Tzale

Re: Somebody, punch her!

said by Tzale:

Care to translate for me to sensible English?

-Tzale
Nope. Sensible English is overrated. Just like you.
--
"In a fight between you and the world, bet on the world." - Franz Kafka

MyDogHsFleas
Premium
join:2007-08-15
Austin, TX
kudos:5
reply to asdfdfdfdfdf

Re: Utility easement

said by asdfdfdfdfdf :

" But it's the age of entitlement. People really believe strongly that they are entitled to what they FEEL they are entitled to."

So when homeowners are upset by the state coercing them into allowing private entities access to their property you believe that this is indicative of their sense of entitlement?
If the state really did "coerce" them, they would have a case. But when they bought the house, the easement was right there on the survey, and they knew it (or should have known). No coercion involved. I can't imagine why you would even think that was the case.

Which is why I say people have these notions that they strongly believe and will fight for things they FEEL they are entitled to, whether or not this has any basis in reality. It's the only way I can explain statements like yours that fly in the face of the facts. For some reason you think that just because it FEELS like the right thing to you, it SHOULD be true.

I have two questions.

1. If a large property owner, such as a large corporate entity, bitches about the state placing conditions on the ownership of their property do you likewise condemn them for their feelings of "entitlement" or do you applaud them for defending what you believe is their inviolable right to do whatever they want to with their property?
To put it another way why is it freedom when powerful property interests protect their turf but it is whining when small property holders try to protect theirs?
Excuse me but what the hell does this have to do with the subject of this thread? There was no "state placing conditions on the ownership of property". It was IN THE DEED THEY SIGNED. And what is this giant red herring you are introducing of corporations vs. individuals owning property? That has nothing to do with this and I'm baffled why you bring it in.

2. Since these companies seem to believe they are not utilities and shouldn't be treated as utilities(for example, they believe they should be deregulated and should have no universal build out requirements imposed upon them), why should they be granted use of easements anyway? They were granted these easements in an age where they were viewed and treated as utilities. If they are no longer utilities maybe their legal status with respect to use of easements should change as well.
The easements are existing agreements. The easement does not say "if utilities are deregulated this easement is null and void". You can't just go back on what was agreed to in a deed and change it arbitrarily.

patcat88

join:2002-04-05
Jamaica, NY
kudos:1
reply to yock

Re: I'd like to propose a solution

You can always put poles up.

patcat88

join:2002-04-05
Jamaica, NY
kudos:1
reply to gaforces

Re: False dichotomy

Burying is easy. Its called a CEV. Only problem is $$$$$$. Uverse is 99 cent store next gen broadband.

patcat88

join:2002-04-05
Jamaica, NY
kudos:1
reply to gaforces

Re: They should simply.....

run it over with a pick up, and drive away

dave
Premium,MVM
join:2000-05-04
not in ohio
kudos:8
Reviews:
·Verizon FiOS

1 edit

1 recommendation

reply to burgermeister

Re: Somebody, punch her!

said by burgermeister:

Was that close?
No, I think it was more like this:

"I work in the broadband industry. Therefore I have no concern about members of the public, because it's all about me."


asdfdfdfdfdfdf

@Level3.net
reply to MyDogHsFleas

Re: Utility easement

quote:
But when they bought the house, the easement was right there on the survey, and they knew it (or should have known). No coercion involved.
Come on, this is like arguing that taxes aren't coercive because we all know we have to pay taxes when we choose to get up in the morning and we could all choose to go to a deserted island in the south pacific if we didn't want to pay taxes. The fact is, if you want to live in anything approximating civilization in the modern world, you are going to be paying taxes to some state somewhere. There is no practical way to avoid them and therefore I feel it is legitimate to say that they are a coercive act.

Easements are par for the course with pretty much any land parcelled up and sold today. For most people, trying to buy land and avoid some type of easement would be like trying to avoid death or taxes. Nor are such easements negotiable in any meaningful sense of the word. I therefore think it is perfectly legitimate to state that this is a form of coercion.

quote:
It was IN THE DEED THEY SIGNED."
I don't understand the idea that if something is signed that means that there can be no coercion or state force involved. To go back to taxes, you sign your tax return. Does this mean taxes aren't coercive? What if you refuse to sign? Then the state doesn't accept your return as legitimate and then the state comes after you for violating the law by not filing a legitimate tax return. The signature is a formality that doesn't address the underlying question of power and coercion.

quote:
There was no "state placing conditions on the ownership of property.
A deed is a legal instrument. It isn't as if property exists separate from the state and its legal measures. Utility easements don't exist because utilities went and negotiated agreements with each individual property owner and the property owner agreed to mutually satisfactory terms with the utility companies. They exist because a political determination was made that such easements facilitate infrastructure build and therefore the state requires that such things be regularly applied to most property as part of the process by which the state recognizes the legitimacy of property claims(such as a deed).

quote:
And what is this giant red herring you are introducing of corporations vs. individuals owning property? That has nothing to do with this and I'm baffled why you bring it in.
My point was simply that our outrage over state coercion is proportional to the extent to which that coercion affects the wealthy and powerful. Maybe we should feel similar outrage when coercion affects the small property holder as well. I think principle demands this.

quote:
The easements are existing agreements.
Of course they are existing agreements. Are you arguing that existing agreements can not be changed? Before modern utilities developed there were no utility easements. These utility easements later become legal conditions of ownership of property, so clearly the conditions of property ownership can be changed over time. As the circumstances surrounding utilities change, surely the state and society can effect a transformation of conditions of property ownership to reflect this? Certainly, at a minimum, easements on future property transfers could be changed to reflect changes in the status of telecommunications companies as utilities.
It might even be possible for the state to simply alter the status of classification as a utility without having to transform the easements themselves.

In the same way that utility easements developed to grant access to these companies, the access granted can be removed, by a similar process, as their status as utilities should disappear.

quote:
The easement does not say "if utilities are deregulated this easement is null and void".
If they are simply another deregulated provider of some service, that service is NOT viewed as important fundamental infrastructure and they no longer have universal service requirements should they even continue to be classified as utilities?


burgermeister
All Computers Are Junk

join:2000-10-23
Utica, MI

1 recommendation

reply to dave

Re: Somebody, punch her!

said by dave:

said by burgermeister:

Was that close?
No, I think it was more like this:

"I work in the broadband industry. Therefore I have no concern about members of the public, because it's all about me."
Ok, that could work too!
--
"I've learned that depression is merely anger without enthusiasm."


marigolds
Gainfully employed, finally
Premium,MVM
join:2002-05-13
Saint Louis, MO
kudos:2
reply to Ben

Re: I want 100/100

said by Ben:

So let's see, the choices are:

A) Use dial-up. To download the latest Fedora Core 8 DVD image (which is 3.18GB) would take close to a week, if you run the dial-up 24/7.

OR

B) Live with a large box nearby, but download the same DVD image in less than 18 minutes (assuming 25Mbps download).
The boxes provide TV service, not broadband internet.
--
ISCABBS - the oldest and largest BBS on the Internet
telnet://bbs.iscabbs.com
Professional Geographer
Geographic Information Science researcher


marigolds
Gainfully employed, finally
Premium,MVM
join:2002-05-13
Saint Louis, MO
kudos:2
reply to Riplin

Re: who cares what they look like

said by Riplin:

TBH if they offered me 100mbit to my house for a reasonable rate I could care less what they look like.
What if they were offering you 400 channels of television instead? That's what those boxes provide, not internet.


marigolds
Gainfully employed, finally
Premium,MVM
join:2002-05-13
Saint Louis, MO
kudos:2
reply to jester121
said by jester121:

So geek on over to a real estate law site and read up on utility easements. These companies aren't breaking the law; homeowners are generally idiots and don't realize what is and is not allowed according to zoning, easement, and other local regulations.
RTA.
They placed the box outside the easement.


marigolds
Gainfully employed, finally
Premium,MVM
join:2002-05-13
Saint Louis, MO
kudos:2
reply to Bobcat79

Re: Utility easement

said by Bobcat79:

said by Tzale:

said by Bobcat79:

Ummm... No, sorry.
Your wrong. It was 2 feet over the property line!!!
And they fixed that. It not the first time a utility made a mistake, and it won't be the last time.
No they didn't.
"Gordon said the company did not plan any additional compensation other than filling the portion of her hillside mistakenly dug up and replanting vegetation. AT&T still plans to install one or two service boxes at the location."

That is far from fixed. They actually removed 2 feet of the front yard outside the easement.
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GemSnake
Premium
join:2000-10-19
3rd layer
reply to dave

Re: Somebody, punch her!

said by dave:

said by burgermeister:

Was that close?
No, I think it was more like this:

"I work in the broadband industry. Therefore I have no concern about members of the public, because it's all about me."
Me? I don't think I'm her neighbor, otherwise I'd punch her myself.
--
"In a fight between you and the world, bet on the world." - Franz Kafka

Bobcat79
Premium
join:2001-02-04
reply to marigolds

Re: Utility easement

said by marigolds:

No they didn't.
"Gordon said the company did not plan any additional compensation other than filling the portion of her hillside mistakenly dug up and replanting vegetation. AT&T still plans to install one or two service boxes at the location."

That is far from fixed. They actually removed 2 feet of the front yard outside the easement.
What part of "filling the portion of her hillside mistakenly dug up and replanting vegetation" don't you understand?


Tzale
Proud Libertarian Conservative
Premium
join:2004-01-06
NYC Metro
reply to GemSnake

Re: Somebody, punch her!

said by GemSnake:

said by Tzale:

Care to translate for me to sensible English?

-Tzale
Nope. Sensible English is overrated. Just like you.
Your parents really failed in raising you.

Troll.

-Tzale
--
Neoconservatives (G.W.B) are not true conservatives. A conservative believes in defending the Constitution. First they ignore you, then they laugh at you, then they fight you, then you win. - RON PAUL 2008 »www.usconstitution.net/const.html


Tzale
Proud Libertarian Conservative
Premium
join:2004-01-06
NYC Metro

2 edits
reply to burgermeister
said by burgermeister:

said by Tzale:

Care to translate for me to sensible English?

-Tzale
Let me take a stab at it:

I love to play WoW at the highest speeds available from my parent's basement. I don't care how bad their front yard looks because it's all about me.

Was that close?
Bingo!!!

»Another stupid research

Probably a depressed loser who never sees sunlight and is pissed at the world since he is still a virgin at 32...

-Tzale

--
Neoconservatives (G.W.B) are not true conservatives. A conservative believes in defending the Constitution. First they ignore you, then they laugh at you, then they fight you, then you win. - RON PAUL 2008 »www.usconstitution.net/const.html


Tzale
Proud Libertarian Conservative
Premium
join:2004-01-06
NYC Metro
reply to GemSnake
said by GemSnake:

said by dave:

said by burgermeister:

Was that close?
No, I think it was more like this:

"I work in the broadband industry. Therefore I have no concern about members of the public, because it's all about me."
Me? I don't think I'm her neighbor, otherwise I'd punch her myself.
And they'd throw your ass in jail where you'd become the "bitch" for some nice prison lovin'!

I hear they have massive "pipes" in prison... I'm sure you'd just love that experience!!

-Tzale
--
Neoconservatives (G.W.B) are not true conservatives. A conservative believes in defending the Constitution. First they ignore you, then they laugh at you, then they fight you, then you win. - RON PAUL 2008 »www.usconstitution.net/const.html

JerryTimes

join:2002-01-09
Roseville, MI
reply to patcat88

Re: They should simply.....

Very adult of you.

Isn't it nice that all of this new technology, which by the way doesn't offer anyone anything more than they can allready get with cable or satellite, has to have these eyesores placed everywhere. I understand utility companies have easnemt rights. There is a telephone pole in my back yard which has power, 2 cable companies and AT&T phone on it, if they were to ever want to put those huge boxes back there, I wouldn't be very happy.


marigolds
Gainfully employed, finally
Premium,MVM
join:2002-05-13
Saint Louis, MO
kudos:2
reply to Bobcat79

Re: Utility easement

said by Bobcat79:

said by marigolds:

No they didn't.
"Gordon said the company did not plan any additional compensation other than filling the portion of her hillside mistakenly dug up and replanting vegetation. AT&T still plans to install one or two service boxes at the location."

That is far from fixed. They actually removed 2 feet of the front yard outside the easement.
What part of "filling the portion of her hillside mistakenly dug up and replanting vegetation" don't you understand?
I understand that she lost the vegetation that was there until the current vegetation grows back, that the integrity of the hill in rains is now ruined for good, and that the filled section in the very front of her house will look completely different from the rest for a good 20-30 years given the area where she lives.
Hence why I said "far from fixed".
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Professional Geographer
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Bobcat79
Premium
join:2001-02-04


marigolds
Gainfully employed, finally
Premium,MVM
join:2002-05-13
Saint Louis, MO
kudos:2
Put it another way... that's a region where the hills are mostly decomposed granite caps. You want to claim that the fill put in had the same hydrologic and geologic qualities as decomposed granite?
That AT&T actually went to the cost necessary to really make the damages whole again? Because if they did not, and they did not compensate the difference (and the article says no compensation was paid), then it is not fixed.
--
ISCABBS - the oldest and largest BBS on the Internet
telnet://bbs.iscabbs.com
Professional Geographer
Geographic Information Science researcher

Bobcat79
Premium
join:2001-02-04
Since neither of us are there, neither of us knows.


KA3SGM
- -... ...- -
Premium
join:2006-01-17
West Chester, PA
kudos:1
Reviews:
·Comcast
·Cricket Broadband
·Verizon FiOS
reply to cooperaaaron

Re: They should simply.....

said by cooperaaaron:

Plant some trees around these boxes. If they dig up the yard in front of your home, in keeping within the limits of the utility easements, they should make it look better, how much more will it cost for a few trees? they already dug the hole..
They could always take a lesson from the Cellular Telephone Industry with their towers designed to look like trees.

Just paint the cabinet a brown/olive drab and attach a bunch of fake branches to it.

It might be the biggest and ugliest Shrub in the neighborhood, but at least they could say that they made an effort to camouflage the damn thing.

Maybe you could negotiate with AT&T to install some nice colored lights on it as well during the Christmas Holiday season.
--
"Lithium is no longer available on credit"


a333
A hot cup of integrals please

join:2007-06-12
Rego Park, NY
reply to marigolds

Re: who cares what they look like

ehh, no way jose. The boxes are known as VRADS, and its common knowledge on this site that AT&T's VRADS provide VDSL service which is split among TV and teh interwebs.


a333
A hot cup of integrals please

join:2007-06-12
Rego Park, NY
reply to marigolds

Re: I want 100/100

read the article again. It states that AT&T's boxes provide TV and internet service.


a333
A hot cup of integrals please

join:2007-06-12
Rego Park, NY

2 edits
reply to asdfdfdfdfdfdf

Re: Utility easement

since when was phone service not essential/a utility?

-Sigh-
why don't you just go back to 400 Baud dialup? It's people like you who'll ultimately force us back into the Middle Ages. Don't like it? Dont buy it. Vote with your wallet. It's a capitalist society for a reason, bro.
Soon enough, AT&t will be forced to quit installing the "crappy" service, and will go for underground BPON.


a333
A hot cup of integrals please

join:2007-06-12
Rego Park, NY
reply to KA3SGM

Re: They should simply.....

how's this for an idea?
go grab yourself a 300 baud modem while they last. plug 'er into the phone line. Bingo! you have teh interwebs, with absolutely no ugly boxes in the equation!

*/claps and cheers from the tree and greenback huggers club/*


asdfdfdfdfdf

@Level3.net
reply to a333

Re: Utility easement

"since when was phone service not essential/a utility?"

I'm not opposed to the idea of easements. Easements are a trade off. Everyone grants use of land so that everyone can benefit from universal build out of services. The benefits of infrastructure are spread around to everyone and everyone helps facilitate build out of that infrastructure. It's a fair trade.

In those instances where a company is actually providing a basic utility to everyone I don't have a problem with easements for those services. My point is if these companies want to start rolling out services that cherry pick and they don't want these new services viewed as utility services, because they want limited deployment in an unregulated environment, then why should these services be granted a utility's use of easements.

Surely there is a way to maintain utility easements without granting a company carte blanche simply because it provides phone service?

For example, these ugly boxes this article is talking about are for ATT U-verse. ATT especially wants to get into the video distribution business. ATT insists that it shouldn't be treated under the rules that cable is treated, for example universal deployment obligations. Why then should these U-verse boxes be granted space within utility easements?