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ArcAngelTai

join:2004-07-27
Soddy Daisy, TN

What cable type does Comcast use for a drop line?

I have read the FAQ's and there were a few promising topics, but none with specific information. Yet I am not quite sure this is the proper place to post either. If it helps, Comcast is the provider I will be using to get service.

I need to know what type of cable they run to establish service to a new house. (ie... the cable that runs underground from the pole, to my house)

When I called to get a price quote, I was told it would be $8K dollars to establish service to my house. I live 1700 feet off the road, and it is a new house.

I would just like to make sure I can't do it cheaper before I give the go ahead to lay that much cable.

Thanks in advance.

PS: If you have any links to particular coax types, post em for me please.


hailinfantry
Bizarro Quinn
Premium
join:2004-01-18
Brooklyn, NY
How would you be able to "do it cheaper" in the first place? The plant isn't yours to modify. Also, the built-out price you were quoted is quite reasonable considering they will NOT be running a drop at that length, but extending and modifying the HFC plant so you will get adequate reception.

ArcAngelTai

join:2004-07-27
Soddy Daisy, TN
reply to ArcAngelTai

Re: What cable type does Comcast use for a drop li

All I am looking to do is bury the cable. Once I do that, they said they could do the hook-up.

However, I was getting the run around and was unable to determine what cable type they use to connect from house-to-pole.

All I need to know is the cable type.

Thanks for the reply though


hailinfantry
Bizarro Quinn
Premium
join:2004-01-18
Brooklyn, NY
If they quoted you in the thousands, it isn't a simple tap to grounblock connection. They will run a drop for free

What you're dealing with is coaxial hardline. The hardline used could be one type of several. You could not do the installation yourself. What you can do is get your own contractor to do the installation in concert with Comcast's engineers..that is what they offered you when they said you could bury your own line. Guess what...the third party contractors will charge quite a bit more than Comcast's techs/contractors can do alone. Not to mention the fact that amp adjustment, etc. will be required throughout that segment of plant by the in-house techs.

Kip patterson
Premium
join:2000-10-23
Columbus, OH
reply to ArcAngelTai

Re: What cable type does Comcast use for a drop line?

That's a good price, believe it or not.

At 1700 feet they are doing a lot more than just laying cable.


J D McDorce
Premium
join:2001-12-29
Westland, MI
Would a 1700 foot run require at least 1 amp along the way?

Kip patterson
Premium
join:2000-10-23
Columbus, OH
So far as I know, yes, at least one.

The cable used will be hardline, somewher between .5 and .75 inchees in diameter. I'm not familiar with the details of Comcast's cabling practices. It will have some kind of protection against water and burrowing beasts.


mabus
i make the fort glow

join:2002-11-12
Fort Wayne, IN
reply to ArcAngelTai
arcangeltai-

i hear a satellite dish with your name on it calling from the distance.


hailinfantry
Bizarro Quinn
Premium
join:2004-01-18
Brooklyn, NY
Hey mabus, I hear a troll of the day award calling from Justin.


coffaro
Moonie
Premium
join:2003-07-05
Arlington, TX
kudos:3
reply to ArcAngelTai
Around here they use Times Fiber RG 6 double shield coax. That's not what they are going to use for you. At 1700 feet it would need to use Time Fibers under ground .500, .625, .700, .750, .875 or 1 inch. They mostly lay just the .625 and .875. For you I would have used .750 for that long of a run. It would need to be 3 but closer to 4 feet deep. Depending on where you can tap in to the main line, you might need a LE (line Amp). Amp pull would not be a big deal if you don't need a LE or need to power any thing from the cable plant. That's a good price they gave you. The only way to get it lower is to buy the cable and bury it your self. You buying the cable your self and not getting the cable company discount would be almost the same price as them doing it for you. Hope this helps.....:)


hailinfantry
Bizarro Quinn
Premium
join:2004-01-18
Brooklyn, NY
Also, you doing it "yourself" means having a qualified contractor doing the installation in concert with the Comcast engineers. Otherwise, why would they allow you to connect to their plant? If the existing plant is properly balanced, there is virtually no signal at that end tap. As a result, the existing plant would also have to be rebalanced. The Comcast quote is very fair.

ArcAngelTai

join:2004-07-27
Soddy Daisy, TN
reply to ArcAngelTai

Re: What cable type does Comcast use for a drop li

bah, I was afraid you would say that.

Thanks for all the posts in regards to this. And yes, I have looked at satellite, however, latency is a no go. So I may just end up sticking with dial-up until DSL is offered in my location.

Thanks again for the posts.

oldhand
Premium
join:2003-05-16
Saugus, MA
reply to ArcAngelTai

Have you looked into fiber?

I have no idea what Comcast's policy would be, but could you provide a powered enclosure for a drop at the road that would contain an approved cable modem? If so, you might be able to run a 1700' fiber optic Ethernet connection to your home. Just a thought...


hailinfantry
Bizarro Quinn
Premium
join:2004-01-18
Brooklyn, NY
said by oldhand:
I have no idea what Comcast's policy would be, but could you provide a powered enclosure for a drop at the road that would contain an approved cable modem? If so, you might be able to run a 1700' fiber optic Ethernet connection to your home. Just a thought...

That has been suggested before and is actually an interesting and technically feasible solution. You should contact Comcast regarding this and see what their guidance is. You may have to obtain the right to use the easement for your fiber, unless you own the property. Either way, it probably wouldn't cost 8000.00.


coffaro
Moonie
Premium
join:2003-07-05
Arlington, TX
kudos:3
said by hailinfantry:
said by oldhand:
I have no idea what Comcast's policy would be, but could you provide a powered enclosure for a drop at the road that would contain an approved cable modem? If so, you might be able to run a 1700' fiber optic Ethernet connection to your home. Just a thought...

That has been suggested before and is actually an interesting and technically feasible solution. You should contact Comcast regarding this and see what their guidance is. You may have to obtain the right to use the easement for your fiber, unless you own the property. Either way, it probably wouldn't cost 8000.00.

Could you give me a link for that. The only ones I know about would need power. A 1700 foot run for power would cost more would it not? I don't think the power company would put a meter unless it is his address. That in it self would cost less than 8000 but be around 3000 to 4000 with all the gear? Just asking...


hailinfantry
Bizarro Quinn
Premium
join:2004-01-18
Brooklyn, NY
Power Company will power anything that needs to be powered as long as it meets safety standards. Just have a look at all the ancilliary devices the telephone and cable companies have.

jbjetta
Premium
join:2004-07-23
Manassas, VA
At the same time the PUC will pressure them to bring out power, if there are not already laws in place.


coffaro
Moonie
Premium
join:2003-07-05
Arlington, TX
kudos:3
So let me get this right. The Power company will come out and put a 120 volt outlet any were you might need it so you can power up a cable modem and maybe a transmitter of some sort. Further more that the PUC will pressure them if they don't want too? I get that the power company will run power to any home or building, but it sounded to me that he wanted to put a cable modem at the nearest cable tap and put just a modem and what ever it needed to get all the way to his house. First, the cable company (I don't think) would do that. They must bond (ground) the line to the house ground. Yes I know sum installers have not done this, but the cable company would say that's why they could not just run a line down the pole for him. The power company might do it if, you pay for it and get any and all permits from the city. I do know of remote OTNs, but they are costly to setup and get permits for.


hailinfantry
Bizarro Quinn
Premium
join:2004-01-18
Brooklyn, NY
Why would the power need to be bonded to the house ground if the house is 1700' away? Put your thinking cap on. The enclosure would actually be the common power source for the modem, and would be grounded accordingly. There is no need to ground the fiber.

Don't act like the Power company doesn't power RT's and Cable plant. They would install a meter, not a random 120V outlet

The enclosure would be weatherproof and meet certain safety and code guidelines.

ArcAngelTai

join:2004-07-27
Soddy Daisy, TN
reply to ArcAngelTai

Re: What cable type does Comcast use for a drop li

Now this is a new fresh approach. $4K is definitely more reasonable than $8K. If anyone has any links, this is getting in over my head :S.

but yea, if I can do that, I will definitely call the cable company and talk to em about it. How much would a fiber optic cost me? I can even run the power supply to the box, I have plenty of unground power cable. I just recently wired power to a Garage and got way more than I needed -- free.

As for the grounding, You can just bury a grounding rod(although some utilitis are VERY picky unless the installer is given PARTICULAR instrucitions.)

And yes, it is my property.


coffaro
Moonie
Premium
join:2003-07-05
Arlington, TX
kudos:3
reply to hailinfantry

Re: Have you looked into fiber?

Sorry, met to say cable needed to be grounded not the power. You would need power to power up the eqpt. that would take FR to light for the fiber. The cable company wont convert it for you. I have not priced RT's, so are they cheaper than what the cable company can do for you?

Yes the power company will put a meter in , but at what coast, and then you still have to buy the fiber a RT or under ground vault plus a transmitter with a matching receiver.

I'm just saying I don't think the cable company will go for it. They have already told him what they can or are willing to do.


Joe-

@unknown
reply to ArcAngelTai

Re: What cable type does Comcast use for a drop li

dont think for a second that burying 1700ft of fiber optic is gonna be cheaper then 1700 feet of coax


imrf
Premium
join:2002-06-06
Utica, MI
said by Joe-:
dont think for a second that burying 1700ft of fiber optic is gonna be cheaper then 1700 feet of coax
Sure it is, »cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?Vi ··· ame=WDVW. Place that in a PVC tube and it's a hell of a lot cheaper.

Kip patterson
Premium
join:2000-10-23
Columbus, OH
reply to ArcAngelTai
Up near Kidron, Ohio there's an Amish fellow who is a remarkably successful horse trader. He has a lovely house, but it has no elctricity and no phone. He must have a phone for his business, however, so there is a shed in the front yard little bigger than an outhouse with a light on top that flashed when there is a phone call. Folks know that it takes him a long time to get to the phone. He sometimes uses a bicycle!

You could do the same. Install a pipe mast with a NEMA waterproof enclosure. Install an electrical service entrance panel, a modem and a WAP. The electric company drops in a service (mount the meter on the rear) and the cable company drops in coax.

Put a yagi antenna on top of the whole thing aimed at the house. You haven't mentioned trees and elevation changes, but you should be able to make it work for a price in the neighborhood of a grand.

ArcAngelTai

join:2004-07-27
Soddy Daisy, TN
reply to ArcAngelTai
well, that would be an interest route, but the easement is rather narrow... then again, I AM VERY determined to get some kind of broadband :P


Joe-

@unknown
reply to imrf
quote:
Sure it is, »cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem... Place that in a PVC tube and it's a hell of a lot cheaper.
your forgeting the cost of the pvc and digging a trench for the pvc, because when the cable company burries a cable they basically have a machine that just jamms it 2 feet underground. also theres the practicality of it, how do you plan on threading 1700' of cable through 1700' of pipe, you can just push it through from one end. even with all that taken care of you would still need someone who knows how to put the proper ends on fiber, and if you damage the fiber which is very easy you get to start all over.


imrf
Premium
join:2002-06-06
Utica, MI
He can dig the trench, and as he lays the PVC down put in a draw string(rope) to pull the fiber through. Laying this stuff is not rocket science. As for the ends, he can look up a local shop that may do it, or track down the contractors that do it for Comcast and I'm sure for a fee they will do it.

rody_44
Premium
join:2004-02-20
Quakertown, PA
Reviews:
·Comcast

4 edits
reply to ArcAngelTai

Re: What cable type does Comcast use for a drop line?

standard cost for trenching is a dollar a foot. you can have the drop conduit plowed in for 50 cents a foot. then use the string to pull your fiber. just buy the rolls of conduit comcast uses. it has the string already in it and its cheap. i wouldnt wait to long tho. verizons going to tie all the fiber contractors up. i hear they are lining a army up to lay the fiber. come to think of it why not rent a ditchwitch and plow it in yourself. about a 3 hour job as a novice. sure better then digging 1700 feet.


Brandon81
Resistance Is Futile

join:2001-05-03
Murfreesboro, TN
reply to ArcAngelTai
If comcast approved providing a short drop at the edge of your property I would suggest forgoing the talk of running fiber etc. and just put in two direction wireless access points.

At the edge of the property you would have a cable modem in a weather box connected to the short drop, from there the cable modem would be uplinked into a router, which then uplinks into the wireless transponder.

These would cost less and require much less effort than digging 1700 feet of trench.

I actually think you could get by with two Cisco Aironet 1100's with two directional antenna accessories. Total of less than $1500 for all equipment if bought off ebay.

Much better than $8,000

oldhand
Premium
join:2003-05-16
Saugus, MA

Re: What cable type does Comcast use for a drop li

The Cisco Aironet 1100, like most other wireless routers, is designed for indoor environments. Unless you want to provide heating and cooling to the enclosure, which would defeat the purpose, I suggest that industrial communication equipment designed for outdoor or buried environments is mandatory.