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whatanembarrassement

@taylor01.mi.comcast.

What Idiots !!!

And these are the decisions our "educators" make????

WTF, not a clue in the World !!!

Johnny can't read a BOOK, write an intelligent SENTENCE, do basic MATH but he can GAME on his laptop!!!

Friggin DUH !!!



entropy1
Premium
join:2002-09-25

4 edits

1 recommendation

I teach my child with NO "textbooks", only REAL books, via a public Virtual Academy that I supplement with extra projects. He uses his computer quite a bit and has no real interest in gaming, btw. That's a pretty rotten stereotype. He's learned quite a bit researching his interests and school projects on the internet, plus he knows quite a bit more about e-commerce, scripting, web authoring, etc. than most people do.

Edit: He also knows how to spot a scam, update his antivirus and avoid spyware. He's 7.

I believe that books, paper, pens, pencils, maps, art, science kits...ALL of those goodies...go together with the internet to make for a good education. There have been so many errors found in "textbooks" and so many political interests infused in them that they are better off being done away with.

People are very detached from education in general. Before my son, I tended to look at it in a totally different way.

Now, I see it as a natural process that's really driven by a child's interests (and they ARE interested in more than games if you don't kill those interests with inept "teaching"). No one should force all children to learn from the same stale books. Yuck.

The internet CAN be used as an effective, flexible springboard and basis for a great education without old fashioned boring textbooks.

Good for Arizona.



Jeffrey
Connoisseur of leisurely things
Premium
join:2002-12-24
Long Island
kudos:3
Reviews:
·voip.ms
·Verizon FiOS
·Vonage

said by entropy1:

Edit: He also knows how to spot a scam and update his antivirus. Also, he knows how to avoid spyware. He's 7.
Congratulations. Your child is an exception to the rule, and you should be proud of that. If he is truly as knowledgeable on avoiding spyware as you say, then he is way ahead of the game.

I'm going to go on the safe side, and say that I imagine very few 7 year olds are like this gentleman's son.


scrummie02
Bentley
Premium
join:2004-04-16
Arlington, VA
Reviews:
·Verizon FiOS

1 recommendation

reply to whatanembarrassement

This is good for them, learn some technology. Paperless is the way things are going, face it. Besides, with a proper security policy in place it can be done. Make all students sign an AUG, and if they break it, expel them. Make an example of the first person who does it to scare the bejesus outta them and your set. Lock the laptops down so no one installs stuff, all it takes is a little bit of work. Maintenance is easy, if they screw them up, re-image them, you loose everything, your fault for "f'ing" it up. Have all students store stuff on network shares or or better yet, removable media (floppies and such).

I think it's a great idea, as long as a hard nosed security conscience person is leading the endeavor.



entropy1
Premium
join:2002-09-25

1 recommendation

reply to Jeffrey

Actually I'm the mom. I guess I'm the exception on this board. LoL

Thank you for your kind post.

I will say that most seven year olds I run across ("classmates" , neighbors and family in that age range) are VERY interested in learning this and will dig for more information when the subject is brought up.


markopoleo

join:2003-04-02
Bonne Terre, MO

1 recommendation

reply to Jeffrey

I've learned more on the internet than I've learned in school. School was a waste of time, the only thing schools teach is social skills that one has to learn with other people, other than that its useless.

Is it any wonder why parents are seeing home schooling as a better way to teach kids? I know when i was in school kids leaving school left and right to learn on there own.



Jeffrey
Connoisseur of leisurely things
Premium
join:2002-12-24
Long Island
kudos:3
Reviews:
·voip.ms
·Verizon FiOS
·Vonage

1 edit
reply to entropy1

I apologize. Correct, you are the exception here.

Edit: I'm glad your neighgbors and friends are into seeing how they can prevent what's wrong. That's something positive to hear.

The people I see to fix their PCs from time to time are intersted only in getting online and downloading music. Perhaps the geographical barrier here between life in CO as opposed to NY, but I haven't met a 7 years old yet that is interested in preventing spyware. It's more about getting "Counterstrike" and "iTunes" to work.



sddfasdf

@cox.net
reply to whatanembarrassement

Software such as DEEPFReeze (which is already what most schools use), would prevent the problem of spyware.


averagedude

join:2002-01-30
San Diego, CA
Reviews:
·Cox HSI

1 edit
reply to scrummie02

said by scrummie02:

Lock the laptops down so no one installs stuff, all it takes is a little bit of work. . . . Have all students store stuff on network shares . . .
Yes, lock the laptops down tight software as well as hardware. No need for extras like floppies or cd writers or extra ports. Keep it simple.

Yes, have doc's on network server, not distributed. With doc's on a server the processor can be down sized as well as ram. If all the kids are doing is word doc's and email then a very simple low end basic laptop is all that is needed.

What you would end up with is a glorified PDA and that is a good thing. Just enough exposure so kids are not left behind and parents are able to help.

Actually, IMO if it is done right, you could have a really good system going. It certainly would even the playing field with kids that have and kids that don't.

Edit:
spelling and finish thought.


Jeffrey
Connoisseur of leisurely things
Premium
join:2002-12-24
Long Island
kudos:3
reply to markopoleo

I don't doubt you have.

I'm just saying that I don't know if it's the best idea to buy laptops. My guess is they'll be broken or otherwise damaged either physically, or spyware infected within weeks.



koma3504
Advocate
Premium
join:2004-06-22
North Richland Hills, TX

1 edit
reply to entropy1

said by entropy1:

I teach my child with NO "textbooks", only REAL books, via a public Virtual Academy that I supplement with extra projects. He uses his computer quite a bit and has no real interest in gaming, btw. That's a pretty rotten stereotype. He's learned quite a bit researching his interests and school projects on the internet, plus he knows quite a bit more about e-commerce, scripting, web authoring, etc. than most people do.

Edit: He also knows how to spot a scam, update his antivirus and avoid spyware. He's 7.

I believe that books, paper, pens, pencils, maps, art, science kits...ALL of those goodies...go together with the internet to make for a good education. There have been so many errors found in "textbooks" and so many political interests infused in them that they are better off being done away with.

People are very detached from education in general. Before my son, I tended to look at it in a totally different way.

Now, I see it as a natural process that's really driven by a child's interests (and they ARE interested in more than games if you don't kill those interests with inept "teaching"). No one should force all children to learn from the same stale books. Yuck.

The internet CAN be used as an effective, flexible springboard and basis for a great education without old fashioned boring textbooks.

Good for Arizona.
Very good this is where the learning needs to take place educate and who knows we might get control of this game the internet sooner or later.
--
† Koma †
If YOu Don't Think It's Possable!! It's Acually A Reality!! The best way to predict the future is to invent it. Alan Kay
ku^uipo_keleneka ®


LinuxJunkie

join:2005-01-19
Cyberspace
reply to markopoleo

Watch your there/their/they're's. :P