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WirelessMajr
Premium
join:2005-08-03
College Place, WA

Honestly

100GBs is very reasonable. I used to be of the opinion that I should be able to download whatever I wanted, but bandwidth just hasnt reached basement prices yet.

I mean honestly, if you're using 100GBs a month on a residental connection, then 95% of the time you ARE engaging in less than legal activity. HD quality streams arent THAT plentiful, and even streaming radio isnt that much.

Lets be generious and say a radio stream is 256kbps. 256kbps = 32Kbyte/s. 32*60sec*60min*24h*30d = 82944000KByte = just under 80GB. That's listening to a high quality audio stream 24/7. Hell, even my average bittorrent traffic averages only 20GB a month. Sad to say, but those of us who consume a good deal of bandwidth are just unprofitable customers for a business. The only way we get by is because our heavy usage is subsidized by low traffic users.

I'm not saying that I wouldnt complain too, but at some point in time, heavy users (myself included) have to face reality.


danawhitaker
Space...The Final Frontier
Premium
join:2002-03-02
Urbandale, IA
That statistic works if you're the only person in your house. Fine. Take a household of three or four people. That breaks down to 25 gigs a month. Is that so reasonable? Just with my Xbox 360, I've done at least 8-10 gigs of transfer of game trailers and game demos in less than a month. That doesn't even hit on the game trailers and demos I download that aren't going directly to my Xbox, but instead are on my PC.

It's bad news for legitimate content producers like iTunes and other streaming media outfits. If I were going to get anything online, I'd probably get CNN Pipeline. I wonder how much that would eat up for about 15 hours a day running constantly.

I don't even really care so much at this point, because I've been saying since people started jumping up and down about Utopia that there were flaws, and that other countries do it much better (i.e. Sweden, where you can get 100mbit synchronous uncapped very cheap).

The only way I'd get this kind of service is if a) they weren't throttling ports and b) If they insisted on a cap, they had a max overcharge of around $30 like Sympatio does in Canada.

I shouldn't have to get a business-class connection to do things that the average residential user wants to be able to do. I'd gladly pay a higher price for an unlimited tier, if they'd offer one. Until they do, I'll gladly stick with my 1.5mbit DSL, because I can do what I want with that and run circles around the caps the Utopia ISPs throw into the mix.
--
You're watching Sports Night on CSC so stick around...


RayW
Premium
join:2001-09-01
Layton, UT
kudos:1
said by danawhitaker:

That statistic works if you're the only person in your house. Fine. Take a household of three or four people. T........

I don't even really care so much at this point, because I've been saying since people started jumping up and down about Utopia that there were flaws, and that other countries do it much better (i.e. Sweden, where you can get 100mbit synchronous uncapped very cheap).

The only way I'd get this kind of service is if a) they weren't throttling ports and b) If they insisted on a cap, they had a max overcharge of around $30 like Sympatio does in Canada.

I shouldn't have to get a business-class connection to do things that the average residential user wants to be able to do. I'd gladly pay a higher price for an unlimited tier, if they'd offer one. Until they do, I'll gladly stick with my 1.5mbit DSL, because I can do what I want with that and run circles around the caps the Utopia ISPs throw into the mix.
Actually, the caps are not just on Utopia, but all the services for the ISPs I am familiar with. Not to say that there are not some that do not have caps, but I do not know about them. But if you have X number of people pumping max bits all day long on one cheap line (times a lot of lines), no provider will stay in service very long. Someone has to pay for that all the way down the pipe from you to the source. I like a decent provider who says up front what the limits are. If you can't handle it, then it lets you know to keep looking for another source, which it sounds like you are doing.

And Utopia is not a provider of services, they are a provider of a line that the incumbents were dragging their collective feet on for much of the area. What you do with that line depends on you and the actual service provider, thanks to Qwest buying a lawmaker (who is not even near the Utopia served area but all the way south) and making Utopia only a line and not a service.

Can't understand why you deserve business class service at peon rates. Maybe the airlines should let us all fly first class for the cost of steerage? Wonder how long they would be in business with the loss of more than half of the seating and back to paying for all that food and drink?
--
I am not lost, I find myself every time.


GetAClueDude

@cox.net
Can't understand why you deserve business class service at peon rates.
Since when is an uncapped, unlimited service considered business class ? If a provider says unlimited, they need to be prepared for users to take that at face value and use bandwidth as they see fit. Otherwise they need to slap the business school morons and tell them to quit using unlimited in the advertising material if the technology can't support it.

iotastorm

join:2006-01-24
Florissant, MO
reply to WirelessMajr
Hmm.. wonder what the bandwidth cap will be when you get 3 TV's with 3 channels of HI-DEF (1 for each TV) plus the Internet and/or VOIP....

vigilant_e

join:2006-07-20
The bandwidth cap only applies to the internet traffic. The TV and phone are partitioned off onto their own networks. According to the MStar technician that installed iProvo in my last apartment, the router at my end of the fiber shapes 100Mbps for all three services. The TV service includes up to 3 concurrent TV channels, each on their own ethernet cable (you have to string the cable to each TV, apart from the internet network). Those three channels share about 80 Mbps of the 100Mbps available.

The router also provides two phone lines for the house which share about 2 or 3Mbps.

The rest is available for internet use. I do not know if these ratios are set, or if I could have a broader internet pipe if I don't use the TV and phone (which I don't). The real limit is the router right now.