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Zazz

@comcast.net

is ATT DSL PPPoE or DHCP?

I was wondering whether ATT DSL internet is PPPoE (requires name and password to log on) or DHCP (no name or password required to log on) ...


keithAA1

join:2000-12-03
Shelton, CT

PPPoE


reply to Zazz

It's PPPoE, but if your IP address is dynamic (new address every time you log in) DHCP is also used. It's not a case of "either or".



Zazz

@comcast.net

anyone know whether you can use a router with ATT interner?
so to setup a router on ATT DSL internet, I'll need to use the PPPoE, right?



satasi
2nd Little Angel
Premium,MVM
join:2001-07-04
San Antonio, TX

Yes, you can use a router.....yes, you set it up as PPPOE and put your userid and password in the router. SATASI
--
He who knows never speak..... He who speaks never knows.......


carmine

join:2002-09-30
Waterbury, CT

said by satasi:

Yes, you can use a router.....yes, you set it up as PPPOE and put your userid and password in the router. SATASI
Actually, I think it has been determined that you are better off setting the router for Dynamic IP and letting the modem do the PPPoE stuff.

One thing's for certain, you don't want *both* the modem and the router trying to handle the PPPoE! Either put the modem in bridged mode and setup the router for PPPoE, or leave the modem set for PPPoE and the router in Dynamic IP.


gregamy

join:2003-05-22
Middletown, CT

PPPoE (Point-to-Point Protocol over Ethernet) is the method of connecting to AT&T via a DSL line, allowing them to use authentication methods for access (versus, for example, a configured serialized router as in cable-based IP). DHCP (Dynamic Host Control Protocol) is the method of obtaining a valid IP address on the network (versus a static IP).

They are doing different things, and are not necessarily mutually exclusive. For example, you can use PPPoE and have a static IP address, or you can use a configured router and have DHCP.

Dial-up Internet, for example, is PPPoE using DHCP.

What these guys are trying to tell you is that AT&T requires PPPoE to connect to their network (as do the vast majority of DSL providers), and unless you have a commercial account you will obtain an IP address via DHCP.

If you don't have a router then you connect your PC directly to the DSL modem and use PPPoE to authenticate and gain access, then get an IP address.

Alternatively, you can use most any retail router to do that work; you should configure your router to itself authenticate to AT&T via PPPoE and then *it* will deliver a completely different IP address to your PC. It will route the traffic between your local network (on your side of the router) to AT&T's network (the side that it authenticated to).

If you prefer, you can configure your router to bridge, or pass through, the PPPoE traffic and you can set up your PC to do the PPPoE authentication; of course, if you do that then only your PC will be able to connect to the Internet (unless you share that connection via Windows or something like that).

Capiche?


carmine

join:2002-09-30
Waterbury, CT

said by gregamy:

Alternatively, you can use most any retail router to do that work; you should configure your router to itself authenticate to AT&T via PPPoE and then *it* will deliver a completely different IP address to your PC. It will route the traffic between your local network (on your side of the router) to AT&T's network (the side that it authenticated to).

If you prefer, you can configure your router to bridge, or pass through, the PPPoE traffic and you can set up your PC to do the PPPoE authentication; of course, if you do that then only your PC will be able to connect to the Internet (unless you share that connection via Windows or something like that).
Or, you configure the modem to handle the PPPoE logon and then configure the router essentially the same way you would for use with a cable modem except change the router's MTU from the default 1500 to 1492. That's how I have my DLink DI-624 / 4100 modem setup and it works well.

slreno

join:2001-08-30
Vandalia, OH

so in other words this is not a full time conection... if the modem or the router has to login then the connection goes down at some point meaning it is not a 24/7 connection?



NormanS
I gave her time to steal my mind away
Premium,MVM
join:2001-02-14
San Jose, CA
kudos:11
Reviews:
·SONIC.NET
·Pacific Bell - SBC

said by slreno:

so in other words this is not a full time conection... if the modem or the router has to login then the connection goes down at some point meaning it is not a 24/7 connection?
Correct. However, if the device running the PPPoE session is left on 24/7, it will appear to be an "always on" connection.
--
Norman
~Oh Lord, why have you come
~To Konnyu, with the Lion and the Drum


soup du jour
I'm so bad... I should be in detention
Premium
join:2001-12-12
Danbury, CT
reply to Zazz

Click for full size
here is where you place those settings


Murph1

join:2005-09-02
New London, CT
reply to Zazz

One other method of connecting not mentioned here (if you're ever in a jam) is if you have no router at all and only a simple bridge modem, you would connect directly to the PC using AT&T's provided software or by using the PPPoE built into Windows XP.
--
Murph