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sempergoofy
Premium
join:2001-07-06
Smyrna, GA
Reviews:
·AT&T Southeast

Help with removing washing machine hose

Click for full size
Hot water connection on left
I decided to replace the washing machine hoses with braided "burstproof" hoses since the wife and I usually leave the connections on. (Yes, I know that is foolish and that there are better solutions to that issue, too.)

I was unable to get the hot water connection off. As you can see in the picture, there is evidence that some part of of the hose connection is rusting as you can see in the rusty in the drip line below the connection.

I tried plumber-type channel-lock pliers and even my vise-grips briefly. The more pressure I put, the whole faucet started tilting toward the wall of the plastic enclosure you see in the photo. There is a short length of copper pipe beneath the plastic enclosure before it joins to polybutylene (the reformulated stuff, post lawsuits). Thus the flexibility to tilt.

I tried wedging a tool between the red handle and the wall to prevent tilt while trying to turn the the hose connection. Didn't really help because the thinness of the plastic enclosure wall.

So the question is, who has suggestions for the best way to free the stuck hose connection.
--
nohup rm -fr /&

garys_2k
Premium
join:2004-05-07
Farmington, MI
Reviews:
·Callcentric
·callwithus

1 recommendation

You'll have to brace the valve's body with another wrench as you torque the hose connection. Don't brace against the valve stem, but you may have to remove it to get a good grip on the valve body. The key is to not put stress on the pipe connection, but to keep the torque "local" between the hose connection and the valve body.



Caddyroger
Premium
join:2001-06-11
To the west
reply to sempergoofy

You could try some penetrating fluid it might help.
--
Caddy



capecoddah

join:2005-03-18
Yarmouth Port, MA
kudos:1
reply to sempergoofy

Torch heat (don't 'cook' the valve).



Anonuser

join:2003-01-03
Milwaukee, WI
reply to sempergoofy

I second penatrating oil. Go get a can of Synthetic penitrating oil. liberally spray it on, and leave it sit for a day or 2.
--
»www.WiiNetCommunity.com FREE RELIABLE WEB HOSTING!



cdru
Go Colts
Premium,MVM
join:2003-05-14
Fort Wayne, IN
kudos:7
reply to sempergoofy

If all else fails, a Dremel would take care of it.

The rust mark may or may not be an indication that it's leaking. If you live in a location with humidity, water may just be condensing on the metal and then dripping off.
--
Go Colts



Dennis
Premium,Mod
join:2001-01-26
Algonquin, IL
kudos:5
reply to capecoddah

said by capecoddah:

Torch heat (don't 'cook' the valve).
That's what I'd try....just have to be careful.


z aXis
Premium
join:2003-01-23
Arlington Heights, IL
reply to garys_2k

said by garys_2k:

You'll have to brace the valve's body with another wrench as you torque the hose connection. Don't brace against the valve stem, but you may have to remove it to get a good grip on the valve body. The key is to not put stress on the pipe connection, but to keep the torque "local" between the hose connection and the valve body.
Exactly. This is what a plumber would do.
--
“Show me a man with a tattoo and I’ll show you a man with an interesting past” - Jack London


sempergoofy
Premium
join:2001-07-06
Smyrna, GA
Reviews:
·AT&T Southeast
reply to sempergoofy

Ok. I like penetrating oil suggestion since it is simplest.

The torch suggesting is awfully tempting. Extreme care would have to exercised as suggested since there is plastic and rubber so close by. I have a one of those soldering cloth shields and would probably try to protect the plastic using it.

I like the "use a second wrench suggestion" second best. I would definitely have to remove the valve stem after shutting off the water supply upstream. There is so very little room inside the box and between the connection and walls of the box. But I reckon if I can get a second wrench coming down from the top toward the bottom over the portion remaining after removing the valve stem, then I could use it for counter-torque.

And, what do you know?! The Dremel tool is on the shelf to the left of the washer. I usually forget what a fine cutting device it can be. Not sure I could do it without nicking the valve threads though.
--
nohup rm -fr /&



Zaber
When all are gone, there shall be none

join:2000-06-08
Cleveland, OH
reply to sempergoofy

I would soak it with PB-Blaster, give it some time to soak in, then use the two wrench method.



Hall
Premium,MVM
join:2000-04-28
Germantown, OH
kudos:2

1 recommendation

reply to sempergoofy

said by sempergoofy:

...since the wife and I usually leave the connections on. (Yes, I know that is foolish and that there are better solutions to that issue, too.)
Off-topic ... How many people routinely turn those on and off as they use them ?? I've NEVER considered shutoff valves to have that purpose. That's like sitting on the toilet, reaching down and opening or closing the shutoff before you need to flush, isn't it ??

I've never had a washer hose burst either...


Jahntassa
What, I can have feathers
Premium
join:2006-04-14
Conway, SC
kudos:4

said by Hall:

Off-topic ... How many people routinely turn those on and off as they use them ?? I've NEVER considered shutoff valves to have that purpose. That's like sitting on the toilet, reaching down and opening or closing the shutoff before you need to flush, isn't it ??

I've never had a washer hose burst either...
Not me, personally... Once I got the hoses on and the connections solid I just leave it open. No leak problems at all.

Unfortunately I can't add more advice to the OP than was already posted.


WutanG
Premium
join:2001-12-12
Seaford, DE

2 edits
reply to sempergoofy

The reason for shut offs is simple.If it breaks you want to be able to turn it off right there vs trying to locate the main and water all over the floor by then. They're built for Murphy and his laws

Not there to be shut on and off daily,but a just in case.I assumed most us knew that...just in case for some



Ken
Premium,MVM
join:2003-06-16
Markle, IN

said by WutanG:

Not there to be shut on and off daily,but a just in case.I assumed most us knew that...just in case for some
Sorry, but no. Shutoff valves for a washing machine are meant to be turned on and off every time you use the washer. I realize that almost nobody does it, but the fact remains that you are supposed to.
--
Business website: MerrittConstruction.com   Personal website: KenMerritt.com

robbin
Premium,MVM
join:2000-09-21
Leander, TX
kudos:1

I dont' believe that. Most washing machine installations do not even have the cutoffs easily accessible. Yes, you can get to them, but not for daily use.



Cheese
Premium
join:2003-10-26
Naples, FL
kudos:1
reply to Hall

said by Hall:

said by sempergoofy:

...since the wife and I usually leave the connections on. (Yes, I know that is foolish and that there are better solutions to that issue, too.)
Off-topic ... How many people routinely turn those on and off as they use them ?? I've NEVER considered shutoff valves to have that purpose. That's like sitting on the toilet, reaching down and opening or closing the shutoff before you need to flush, isn't it ??

I've never had a washer hose burst either...
I was going to ask the same thing

smcallah

join:2004-08-05
Home
reply to Ken

said by Ken:

Sorry, but no. Shutoff valves for a washing machine are meant to be turned on and off every time you use the washer. I realize that almost nobody does it, but the fact remains that you are supposed to.
Maybe for paranoid people, they are "supposed to." But most people aren't going to pull out the washer from the wall and go behind it everytime they are going to use the washing machine.

That's like saying you should use the toilet shut off valve everytime after you flush. Or maybe you should go so far as to shut off the sinks. Never know when those pipes are going to burst!

I've personally only seen a toilet pipe burst, and that was BEFORE it got to the shut off valve.

Shutting these things off all the time is being overly paranoid.

Sure, you'll never have a pipe bursting problem with your washer, but the chances are slim anyway. And that's what insurance is for.

smcallah

join:2004-08-05
Home
reply to Ken

said by Ken:

Sorry, but no. Shutoff valves for a washing machine are meant to be turned on and off every time you use the washer. I realize that almost nobody does it, but the fact remains that you are supposed to.
Maybe for paranoid people, they are "supposed to." But most people aren't going to pull out the washer from the wall and go behind it everytime they are going to use the washing machine.

That's like saying you should use the toilet shut off valve every time after you flush. Or maybe you should go so far as to shut off the sinks. Never know when those pipes are going to burst!

I've personally only seen a toilet pipe burst, and that was BEFORE it got to the shut off valve. Perhaps I should turn off the main valve in the house every time! Or shut it off at the meter just in case.

Shutting these things off all the time is being overly paranoid.

Sure, you'll never have a pipe bursting problem with your washer, but the chances are slim anyway. And that's what insurance is for.


Jahntassa
What, I can have feathers
Premium
join:2006-04-14
Conway, SC
kudos:4
reply to Ken

said by Ken:

Sorry, but no. Shutoff valves for a washing machine are meant to be turned on and off every time you use the washer. I realize that almost nobody does it, but the fact remains that you are supposed to.
First i've heard this.. Esp. considering as another poster said, I've yet to see an installation where you can get to the valves without first moving the washing machine, then sitting on it to get to them.


rfhar
The World Sport, Played In Every Country
Premium
join:2001-03-26
Buicktown,Mi
Reviews:
·Power-Net Intern..
reply to Ken

said by Ken:

said by WutanG:

Not there to be shut on and off daily,but a just in case.I assumed most us knew that...just in case for some
Sorry, but no. Shutoff valves for a washing machine are meant to be turned on and off every time you use the washer. I realize that almost nobody does it, but the fact remains that you are supposed to.
If true why are so hard to reach? And why not ball valves rather than gate valves?
--
Whoever said that ignorance is bliss wasn't refering to a person with a computer at his fingertips!
Cure diseases with your computer
Take a look at www.harbins-web.net


bryank

join:2000-03-23
Plainfield, IL
reply to sempergoofy

I would not use the torch, because as the metal gets hot, the plastic housing will begin to melt. I think that would be bad. . .



insomniac84

join:2002-01-03
Schererville, IN
reply to Ken

I have never heard anyone say the shut off values were to be used when not using the washing machine. They are there just for disconnecting and connecting the washing machine hoses. Not for daily on and off use. The washing machine turns it's own water on and off.



SandShark
Long may you run
Premium,MVM
join:2000-05-23
Santa Fe, TX
kudos:3
reply to sempergoofy

Cut the hose. Back up the connection to the valve, then use another pair of Channellocks and try turning the compression fitting. I don't think I'd use heat, though.
--
• • • - - - • • •



sdgthy

@optonline.net
reply to Ken

My understanding was that you're suppose to replace the hoses every few years. Which nobody does either. But unless water damage was likely, such as the washer on a upper floor, one shouldn't have to worry about turning off the valves.

I'm not saying turning the valves off isn't a good idea, especially if water damage is likely if a hose bursts.



tschmidt
Premium,MVM
join:2000-11-12
Milford, NH
kudos:9
Reviews:
·G4 Communications
·Fairpoint Commun..
·Hollis Hosting
reply to sempergoofy

A little heat or penetrating oil is worth a shot, but you don't have much room. If all else fails cut hose off close to value, turn off water, remove valve and replace.

As to the question about turning off water Other then to clean out grit filters we never do. Have gone with braided hose assuming that will prevent a catastrophic burst. I don't have much faith in either detectors or under appliance pans. Unless you constantly check for proper operation and remove dust bunnies the likely hood of it working 20 years down the road are nil.

When we built our home I assumed where ever there was water someday we will have a leak.

We have two story house with bathrooms stacked on top of one another. 1st floor bathroom has a suspended ceiling (we have post and beam home). Over the last 26 years have replaced several of the panels due to "accidents" in the upper bathroom.

Dishwasher and laundry are on first floor over my wife's basement office. There have been several dishwasher leaks, once when fill valve did not shut off and once then the spray arm packing dried out.

Another time the dehumidifier drain plugged and over flowed. I mounted it in a dividing wall. Didn't realize I had driven a nail through drain hose until I tried to fix the leak. Worked fine that way for 15 years.

/Tom



HFB1217
The Wizard
Premium,ExMod 2000-01
join:2000-06-26
Camelot
kudos:2
Reviews:
·Comcast

1 edit
reply to sempergoofy

Cut a notch into the collar you are trying to turn with a hacksaw just enough to break the collar then take a screw driver and spread the opening you have cut. This should allow you to remove it by turning it. There has been some corrosion that has bound the metals together in a form of chemical type bonding stopping you from removing it.

After that when reattaching the new hoses use some Teflon tape on the valve threads before replacing the hoses. This should prevent future trouble.
--
****aka The WIZARD **** A Founding member Seti BBR Team Starfire****



Roundboy
Premium
join:2000-10-04
Drexel Hill, PA

I would go with pipe dope over teflon tape.. its been 100% for me whereas tape has sometimes let stuff though, and make the threads very hard to turn.

I leave my valves on.. I did recently buy burst proof valves... but thats just for insurance.
--
[spoiler]Steve the pirate DIES![/spoiler]



swhx7
Premium
join:2006-07-23
Elbonia
reply to sempergoofy

Turning off the valve every time is a good idea, because there's water pressure in there all the time. What if it broke while you (family) were traveling? It's worth rearranging the machines if you have room.

There's a high-tech alternative: a gadget that turns them on automatically when they're needed (machine is running) and keeps them off the rest of the time. I don't recall what it's called; it was featured on one of those home-improvement shows on TV. You could find out at a big hardware store.



SandShark
Long may you run
Premium,MVM
join:2000-05-23
Santa Fe, TX
kudos:3

Watts makes one.


Watts IntelliFlow Automatic Shutoff Valves

--
• • • - - - • • •


Roundboy
Premium
join:2000-10-04
Drexel Hill, PA
reply to swhx7

those burst proove hoses accomplish the same thing.. it knows when there is a loss of pressure in the line, and stops the flow.

They were very closely priced to the normal rubber hoses...

if you are worried about burst hoses... spend more money on better hoses..

how are the washing machine lins different from a toilet or sink line ?
--
[spoiler]Steve the pirate DIES![/spoiler]