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chinnboy9

join:2002-08-09
Columbus, OH

Gaming Mode - Why does Dlink recommend disabling?

I have spent 8 or 10 hours trying to get my kid's Xbox360 live to work right thru a supposedly Xbox compatible DI-624, and no matter what NAT shows up as "strict" and severely messes it up.

Finally, I tried enabling gaming mode and that fixed the NAT problem.

Dlink recommends that gaming mode be disabled when not playing games. That don't work for me since the kid is not going to be given the ability to modify router settings on his own.

I'm unable to find very much comprehensible information about what gaming mode actually is and what the downside is to leaving it constantly enabled. If someone could point me to something that would lift the fog it would be greatly appreciated.


NetFixer
Bah Humbug
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join:2004-06-24
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2 edits
said by chinnboy9:

I'm unable to find very much comprehensible information about what gaming mode actually is and what the downside is to leaving it constantly enabled. If someone could point me to something that would lift the fog it would be greatly appreciated.
I am not sure just how comprehensible this information will be to you, but the Cisco document Anatomy: A Look Inside Network Address Translators includes a discussion of Full Cone NAT which is I think what D-Link calls Gaming Mode.

The two images below (from the Cisco article) show the difference between Full Cone NAT and Symmetric NAT.






--
History does not long entrust the care of freedom to the weak or the timid.
-- Dwight D. Eisenhower
Test your firewall.
Smell the flowers.

chinnboy9

join:2002-08-09
Columbus, OH
That you very much NetFixer! The Cisco paper is defintely thorough, and I can sort of understand some of it. Which is a major advance for me. If I can summarize my understanding of the difference, probably mangled, when a user intitiates an online game session they open a port for a response from the specific IP address with symetric binding that specific IP can access the port, but with full cone NAT any IP can.

Perhaps thats necessary for the multi-player online games where things need to be flipped from one player to any of a number of others for response. Intuitively, it seems to compromise security, but by how much is beyond me. And probably always will be.

I tested the ports utilized by Xbox Live with Steve Gibson's Shields Up! while the kid is playing online and both come up as "Stealth". So it appears that the compromise of security comes well short of opening the floodgates on my home network. Perhaps thats a misplaced sense of security, but it helps.

I'm still scratching my head wondering how Dlink markets this router as being Xbox Live compatible and supposedly ready to use out of the box when this is by default disabled and nothing on their website or telephone tech support says a word about the need to enable it. I can't help but think this may be attributable to this particular router or game console.

I wish that Dlink says they recommend it be disbaled whenever games are not in use that they at least give some hint as to why.

Thanks again! Maybe this thread will help some other frazzled soul experiencing the frustration I was.

CrossCrucial

join:2008-01-18
Lake Worth, FL
reply to chinnboy9
The latest batch of firmwares for this router don't support XBLA. You need to downgrade to 2.70

here's a post on it, including a link to the firmware since d-link doesn't offer old ones

»jerryword.spaces.live.com/blog/c···17.entry

cheers