dslreports logo
site
 
    All Forums Hot Topics Gallery
spc

spacer




how-to block ads


Search Topic:
uniqs
59941
share rss forum feed

David903

join:2008-01-08
Longview, TX

Tile Corner: Grout or Caulk?

I'm tiling a tub surround with 4 inch porcelain tile. I've tiled it so that there is a 1/4 inch space between the last tile and the tub, and know that that joint needs to be caulked, not grouted. How about the joints at the corner walls of the tub surround? Do those corner joints need grout or caulk? Incidentally, the caulk I'll be using is made by the manufacturer of the grout, and matches it closely in appearance.

robbin
Premium,MVM
join:2000-09-21
Leander, TX
kudos:1
I would probably grout in the corner and then after the grout has dried go back and put on a neat caulk bead over the grout.


Ken
Premium,MVM
join:2003-06-16
Markle, IN
reply to David903
Basically whenever you have two different planes (floor to wall, wall to wall, wall to ceiling) coming together you want to caulk it. There is always a potential for movement between the different planes, so you want the caulk since it is flexible.
--
Business: MerrittConstruction.com | Personal: KenMerritt.com | Xbox Live:KENMERRITT COM


chmod
Premium
join:2000-12-12
Lockport, IL
said by Ken:

Basically whenever you have two different planes (floor to wall, wall to wall, wall to ceiling) coming together you want to caulk it. There is always a potential for movement between the different planes, so you want the caulk since it is flexible.
Well said. Use caulk.
--
Some people are like Slinkies. Not really good for anything, but they still bring a smile to your face when you push them down a flight of stairs.


PenguinChill
How I Wish You Were Here

join:2001-02-12
Fishers, IN
reply to David903
I agree, my shower uses caulk at the corners where two sides meet.

Tyreman

join:2002-10-08
Canada

1 edit
reply to David903
well the interior corners joints if its the interior wall corners you type of(vertical,bottom to top tile to tile) are usually grouted.

If for some reason its a differing install then you have to chaulk it.

the bottom around the space horizontal between the tub rim and tiles us usually chaulked on diy retros.

Done with tub half full of water,you stand in and chaulk.

David903

join:2008-01-08
Longview, TX
reply to David903
I had no idea that there were so many ways to handle the inside corners and other changes in plane of a tub surround.

After I posted this question here, and read the answers, I went to »www.johnbridge.com and searched in the forums there for the terms "corner caulk grout" and got even more information, not all of which is consistent.

I think that in my job, I'll caulk the corners, wait a day, and then grout everything else.

Thanks to all who replied for helping define the issue.

robbin
Premium,MVM
join:2000-09-21
Leander, TX
kudos:1
The problem with caulking first is that grout won't adhere to caulk. So every spot the grout adjoins the caulk there will be a place where mold can grow in the crack. You really should grout first. If you don't want to caulk over the grout, then dig the grout back out of the corner joint before caulking it.


Ken
Premium,MVM
join:2003-06-16
Markle, IN
reply to David903
Yeah like robbin said don't caulk first. You want to grout everything and just don't pack the grout into the space you intend to caulk. You will end up with a little bit in there, that's no big deal. You just want it so that when you caulk, it can get down between the tiles a little and have something to hang on to. If you caulk just on the surface it won't grab as well.
--
Business: MerrittConstruction.com | Personal: KenMerritt.com | Xbox Live:KENMERRITT COM

David903

join:2008-01-08
Longview, TX
Makes sense to me: grout, then caulk.

Thanks!


Quiglag
God is Love
Premium
join:2004-09-19
Ontario, CA
reply to David903
no no no... you want to get sanded caulk. It looks like grout, but it is flexible. You should be able to get it at any tile store.
--
My Website & Gallery - Tool Reviews


stromi

join:2000-06-11
Englishtown, NJ
I think sanded grout is for joints over 1/8", and not meant to increase flexibility. Be carefull using sanded grout on tile like soft stone, it will scratch the surface.

If you want to use non-sanded for a >1/8" joint, buy latex added, or seperate latex mix and add it in. This will add water resistance, increase bonding and give you a minor boost in flexibility.

Some grouts have a matching "grout caulk", which is the same color and texture (or close to it). These are made for use at joints such as tub/tile and applied with a caulk gun AFTER grouting is complete.

Another tip is to make sure your grout does not dry to fast, if its real dry in the house, cover the grouted surface with craft paper so the grout can cure.


wolverine_99
Premium
join:2004-12-07
Mckinney, TX
reply to David903
Good luck on the project. I did a very similar project this past fall. My advice grout then caulk. Don't worry if a little grout gets in the corners. You can go through and remove it before it dries, or just leave it if it's not that much. Then caulk and you are good to go. Caulking the corners will allow for movement and flexibility since houses do have movement. Like stromi said, they do sell caulk that will match your grout color. The drawback is the selection is limited, but the colors are in the common grout colors. Last steps are to remove the grout haze with cheese cloth and seal the grout after it is fully cured.