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TamaraB
Question The Current Paradigm
Premium
join:2000-11-08
Da Bronx
kudos:1
Reviews:
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1 recommendation

How would they know?

How can an ISP know that the contents of a data stream is copyrighted material or not? Isn't this sort of impossible to determine? Encrypted packets arriving at some location from diverse sources?

Unless the data was totally intercepted, reconstructed, decrypted, and then compared to a copyrighted source, there is no way to know what the content is.

Bob

--
Motor Vessel - Tamara B.
43' Long-Range Trawler
Cape Elizebeth ME.
See her Here.


AlexNYC

join:2001-06-02
Edwards, CO
That's the best comment in the entire thread. Think about this, Comcast is trying to block torrent traffic, but are not particularly successful because once the data is encrypted and the default port is changed they don't know what exactly it is. Sure, they suspect and can try to guess but that is not good enough.


Jason Levine
Premium
join:2001-07-13
USA

1 recommendation

reply to TamaraB
Not only copyrighted, but how would they know that the transfer wasn't approved by the copyright owners? For example, I used BitTorrent last night to download the first part of Trent Reznor's new album titled Ghost. This is copyrighted music, so should the ISP block it or warn me that I'm engaged in illegal activity?

No, since Trent himself (or at least someone with technical knowledge that Trent employed) put that music on the P2P networks. (See: »NIN Embraces P2P Again, Offers Free Music ) There is no way for an ISP to keep track of which music downloads are approved by the copyright holders and which aren't approved.
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TamaraB
Question The Current Paradigm
Premium
join:2000-11-08
Da Bronx
kudos:1
reply to AlexNYC

Not to mention the fact, that to reverse-engineer the encryption is in itself a violation of the DCMA.


jt50

@comcast.net
reply to AlexNYC
get you facts straigh. comcast does not block it and slow it down so it does not bottle neck there network. it comcast really wanted to block it they would. i still dont like the fact comcast slows down torrent traffic.


AlexNYC

join:2001-06-02
Edwards, CO
How do you think I know this? Look at my profile, I use Comcast. No, they don't "just slow it down". They block seeding by inserting a RST Flag, which terminates the connection. Encrypting solves this problem. Do a DSLR search on Comcast and read a little before you make dumb statements.