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Maxo
Your tax dollars at work.
Premium,VIP
join:2002-11-04
Tallahassee, FL

Why am I so shocking (static electricity)

It seems that my body is more vulnerable to static electricity. When the weather gets cool and dry like it has been off-and-on here, I get shocked all the damn time. At the grocery store I simply cannot touch anything metal. Everything will zap me there, and I get a lot of strange looks.
Here at work, the door handle that is behind my desk consistently zaps me really good. It's only the part of the door handle from the inside. I can open the door from the outside without a problem.
The fix is to take my key and touch the door handle. It get a nice little arch and then I'm good to open the door.
Another guy in my office has the same problem, but he doesn't get zapped as bad. He said when he was younger it was worst, like me, but in time it is not so bad anymore.

Anyone know why the hell I have been cursed with being so damn electric? What causes one person to get shocked more than others?
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wth
Premium
join:2002-02-20
Iowa City,IA

»static electricity and FIOS


GunnarDanne

join:2002-12-02
Crown City, OH

2 edits
reply to Maxo

I was bored one day and read about spontaneous combustion and how some claim its related to static electricity. The reason for the claim was that supposed victims complained they experienced a lot of electrical discharge (their whole life). I'll try and find it again...

___

edit 1 »en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Static_electricity

Possible explanation #1: Maybe your skin is more dry than most people's. So resistence would increase making it harder for you to discharge. You're like a big squishy capacitor.

___

edit 2

Yea, I think that is the answer. Static electricity is the build up of excess charge so I think you retain more charge because your skin has a higher resistence.



rfhar
The World Sport, Played In Every Country
Premium
join:2001-03-26
Buicktown,Mi
reply to Maxo

The difference could be what type of shoes you are wearing.



i1me2ao
Premium
join:2001-03-03
TEXAS
reply to Maxo

funny thing is my brother is not but my nephew is like me. wearing same clothes and everything. it feels as if i more prone to it than he is..
--
»www.thereligionofpeace.com/



nwrickert
sand groper
Premium,MVM
join:2004-09-04
Geneva, IL
kudos:7
Reviews:
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reply to Maxo

It seems that my body is more vulnerable to static electricity.
I think it has more to do with what you are wearing, than with you genes. The type of carpeting might also be relevant.
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psicop
More human than human
Premium
join:2005-12-21
Australia
reply to Maxo

Lay down on the ground (corpse style); and by ground I mean direct contact with the earth, it could be grass, dirt or even a granite slab.

Standing is also good and sitting meditation as well.



Greg_Z
Premium
join:2001-08-08
Springfield, IL
reply to Maxo

You really need to increase your intake of Di-Hydrogen Monoxide.



jm8

join:2003-09-21
Graceville, FL

I heard that stuff can kill you. It's a major componenet of acid rain, isnt it?



Greg_Z
Premium
join:2001-08-08
Springfield, IL

Also caused that mess in the Carolinas and Ohio this past week.



jm8

join:2003-09-21
Graceville, FL
reply to Maxo

In all seriousness, I do think some people can be more susceptible to static electricity. I heard a story of some kid in school who I think got banned from his schools computer room, because he kept messing them up. In his classes he has to sit several rows back, so he doesnt mess up the projectors and computers, etc..



ultracooldave

@verizon.net
reply to Maxo

I think an intake of hydrogen and oxygen would solve the problem, you could substitute either if you want to be laughing, unfortunately I cannot recommend this approach.



Maxo
Your tax dollars at work.
Premium,VIP
join:2002-11-04
Tallahassee, FL
reply to rfhar

said by rfhar:

The difference could be what type of shoes you are wearing.
I thought of this, but I have this problem with different kinds of shoes. Flip-flops, leather, even hemp shoes.


Maxo
Your tax dollars at work.
Premium,VIP
join:2002-11-04
Tallahassee, FL
reply to nwrickert

said by nwrickert:

It seems that my body is more vulnerable to static electricity.
I think it has more to do with what you are wearing, than with you genes. The type of carpeting might also be relevant.
The carpeting is the same carpeting for the other four people who work in my office and those that come and go. One also gets shocked, but not as bad. Nobody else seems to have this problem. We all wear cotton button-downs and cotton slacks.


Maxo
Your tax dollars at work.
Premium,VIP
join:2002-11-04
Tallahassee, FL
reply to Greg_Z

said by Greg_Z:

You really need to increase your intake of Di-Hydrogen Monoxide.
That could be it! I drink 1/2 to 3/4 gallon of tea each day at work. Maybe I should start drink sodas like everyone else.


Maxo
Your tax dollars at work.
Premium,VIP
join:2002-11-04
Tallahassee, FL
reply to jm8

said by jm8:

In all seriousness, I do think some people can be more susceptible to static electricity. I heard a story of some kid in school who I think got banned from his schools computer room, because he kept messing them up. In his classes he has to sit several rows back, so he doesnt mess up the projectors and computers, etc..
I used to have weird and random problems with my school computers. One teacher actually suggested they where reacting to me. I don't know about that though. I've never had anything too crazy with my computer beyond Windows just being funky. No such problems since going to Linux. My Windows computer at work doesn't exert any quirky behavior either.


kadar
Premium,ExMod 2001-02
join:0000-00-00
reply to Maxo

magnetic personality ?


GunnarDanne

join:2002-12-02
Crown City, OH
reply to Maxo

So I'm pretty sure I might have answered your question...



Blackbird
Built for Speed
Premium
join:2005-01-14
Fort Wayne, IN
kudos:3
Reviews:
·Frontier Communi..

1 edit
reply to Maxo

The static discharge you describe doesn't just happen... charge has to build up first. There are only two relevant ways for normal charge buildup - one is ionization, which is very unlikely unless you're around some seriously high voltages to start with.

The other is a result of triboelectric effects. These arise when two insulative materials of certain types are rubbed together or suddenly pulled apart. Either of these can cause electrons to be ripped away from their parent atoms and be trapped together on one surface whilst an opposite charge is created on the other surface. The key point is that it takes rubbing or sudden separation (like pulling off tape from a roll) to generate the charge. And it is the discharge of the accumulated charges that creates the zap-and-snap you notice when you touch a doorknob.

There are two tricks to avoiding the zap: reduce the generated charges in the first place, or touch a dissipative (but not conductive) surface before touching a door handle or other bare metal object. That is, either prevent charge accumulating so no discharge will occur, or reduce the rate of discharge so that an unpleasant current flow does not happen.

To reduce charge generation, avoid or reduce use of clothing containing plastics (many synthetics) or wools - particularly those that swish or slide against other clothing articles or themselves when you walk. Avoid walking with a lot of scuffing, particularly when walking over carpet or vinyl floor tile. Keep the humidity higher (65% or more), especially in winter.

To reduce discharge rates, dissipate the charge by first touching a substantial painted metal surface (like a metal doorframe, a large painted appliance, or a painted steel door) before grasping a conductive bare-metal surface like a door handle or even another person.

As to why you seem more troubled by static discharges than someone else in the same setting, it likely has to do with several factors unique to you:
1) How you normally walk, stride, and scuffle - and how often you lift your trailing foot clear of a floor as opposed to sliding it slightly
2) Differences in shoe-sole materials and how much slippage your stride and the tread pattern permit
3) Your unique skin moisture and conductivity, as well as the type of shower soap and/or lotions you may apply, including to your hair if it's long
4) Composition of clothing you typically wear (inner and outer) and how much swishing and rubbing occurs between clothing items (and even your skin) during your unique walking patterns
5) Differences in furniture-fabric/flooring where people normally sit or work and along their path to the doorknob or whatever other metal object receives the zap.

These affect both static generation and rate of discharge from the stored charge sites on one's clothing/shoes, across the skin to whatever you touch. No two people will be exactly alike. Just walking across a carpeted floor, most folks in the winter will generate 1.5-35.0 KV of static electricity... with the highest voltages seen in extremely dry environments for those wearing the "wrong" kinds of clothing/shoes. That's a 23:1 range amongst people and conditions.
--
If God wanted us to work with electrons, He'd make them big enough to see...



Jwobot

join:2002-08-14
Sterling Heights, MI

2 edits

Do you use dryer sheets when you dry your clothes?

Low humidty causes more static. Use a humidifier in your home to increase humidity



balloonshark
Lets Go Mountaineers

join:2006-08-11
WV
reply to Maxo

I have a theory that goes along with the last post somewhat. You mentioned you drink 1/2 to 3/4 gallons of tea a day. Caffeine can dehydrate you so, increase your own 'humidity' by drinking more water and/or ease up or quit the caffeine intake. I know, it's easier said than done, but it's worth a try.
--
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Maxo
Your tax dollars at work.
Premium,VIP
join:2002-11-04
Tallahassee, FL
reply to GunnarDanne

said by GunnarDanne:

So I'm pretty sure I might have answered your question...
Maybe. I don't seem to have excessively dry skin. It's certainly a good possibility.


Maxo
Your tax dollars at work.
Premium,VIP
join:2002-11-04
Tallahassee, FL
reply to Blackbird

1) Seems possible. I'll see what happens if I make a conscious effort to pick my feet up more.
2) As noted before, this is across all kinds of shoes.
3) Could be.
4) Maybe.
5) I interact with the same furniture as everyone else in the office.



Maxo
Your tax dollars at work.
Premium,VIP
join:2002-11-04
Tallahassee, FL
reply to Jwobot

said by Jwobot:

Do you use dryer sheets when you dry your clothes?

Low humidty causes more static. Use a humidifier in your home to increase humidity
I hang dry most of my clothes, weather permitting.


Hayward
K A R - 1 2 0 C
Premium
join:2000-07-13
Key West, FL
kudos:1

3 edits
reply to Maxo

I find that surprising in FL where even (locals in jackets freezing our butts off) tourist people say how hot and humid it is.

But generally static electric depends on dry and charged environment.... even N FL in winter that surprised me.
--
»haywardm.com (Hayward's Key West)



Maxo
Your tax dollars at work.
Premium,VIP
join:2002-11-04
Tallahassee, FL

Yeah, it's plenty humid up here.
When I was in NV I was getting shocked real bad. My dad has one of the modified buses. I think he had something grounded off wrong, but nobody was getting jolts like I was getting.



Hayward
K A R - 1 2 0 C
Premium
join:2000-07-13
Key West, FL
kudos:1

I think you missed the point static should NOT happen in humid environment (unless you shuffle feet on plastic carpet) It is a MAJOR problem in DRY environments. (Winter north or SW all year)
--
»haywardm.com (Hayward's Key West)


thewayitis

join:2005-12-13
usa
reply to Maxo

Just wondering> Have you had a EMG test? And can you wear a wrist watch?



Maxo
Your tax dollars at work.
Premium,VIP
join:2002-11-04
Tallahassee, FL

I have not had an EMG test, and had not previously heard of one. I just Googled it.
I can't wear any jewelry. It annoys the crap out of me. I have a pair of very expensive glasses that are very light-weight. Usually I wear contacts, but sometimes the glasses are easier, like if I wake up in the middle of the night and can't get back to sleep.



ninjatutle
Premium

join:2006-01-02
San Ramon, CA
reply to Maxo

Its the shoes. I have a bunch of shoes I wear. I find my Kenneth Cole shoes shock while my others will not.

I also find socks make a difference too. I get a greater shock with some black socks.