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elbm

join:2000-08-03
Reisterstown, MD

2 edits
reply to Rick

Re: Time Warners claim is 100% accurate.....

Verizon (Actually it's predecesors Bell Atlantic and Nynex) have been deploying fiber since the early 80s. Verizon has more fiber deployed, even minus the fios fiber, then Time Warner probably will ever have. Verizon's core network/inter office facilities have been running in excess of 10 gig for over a decade with legs now running in excess of 320 gig.

Once it hits the CO/pop/RT every phone call made runs on fiber, every T1 runs on fiber, every DS3 runs on fiber, every gig-e, every fractional......

Time Warner cannot even come close to the bandwidth capabilities Verizon has and has had for many years. The Bells were the pioneers in the deployment of fiber.

edit:

I did not have time to look it up earlier, but here is some perspective.

Time Warner-- 24,000 miles of fiber in their network.
»www.twtelecom.com/about_us/networks.html

Comcast-- 90,000 miles of fiber in their network.
»www.comcastcommercial.com/index.···temid=33

Verizon-- 250,000 miles of fiber in West Virginia alone!
»www22.verizon.com/about/community/wv/

To make statements that the telcos were 10 years too late to the party is an uninformed opinion. The rbocs were the first to deploy fiber and did in a big way, but not with consumer data in mind. Rboc fiber was deployed toward a different end. They were selling dial tone and business data and built a network to carry that second to none. Consumer data connections were not a market until the 90's. The cable companies were not investing and building with an "eye" toward the future-- they just got lucky that their network was more rapidly and economically adaptable to consumer data needs than the telco networks were.

Cable has spent pennies on their networks to deliver data and it will catch up with them in time.

EPS4

join:2008-02-13
Hingham, MA
Your Time Warner source is wrong. Time Warner Telecom was a CLEC unit of Time Warner, which was spun off and is now changing its name to tw telecom (lost the rights to "Time Warner")- no connection whatsoever to Time Warner Cable.


elbm

join:2000-08-03
Reisterstown, MD
The comparison still stands-- Verizon's fiber network dwarfs any cable companies fiber network.


Rick
Premium,MVM
join:2001-02-06
Waterbury, CT
reply to elbm
Hmm..Ok.

Perhaps you can explain then the difference between the slow DSL speeds offered by verizon over the last 10 years versus the cable co's?

I mean..jeesh. It's great that interoffice can get those kinds of speeds.

What ever happened to the consumer?

My comments above stand. TW's claims are 100% accurate.
Verizon is 10 years late to the fiber party....the party that really counts to consumers that is.
--
The Coyote captured the RR! Roadrunner Rick is now Comcastic!


SmartyMcSmart

@comcast.net
reply to elbm
The main difference there is the Verizon data is from 2008 and the Comcast data is from 2004...................

»www.comcast.com/ces/content/imag···rkFS.pdf

Still about half of Verizon...........


VideoGuy

@verizon.net
reply to elbm
Then why do VZ and AT&T lease fiber from cable companies every day in virtually every major market in the country? There are more MSO operated OC pipes leased by Bell hauling tandem and CO traffic than most of you guys could even dream of. In fact, it may be no small irony to learn that many of you with Bell phone have your LD calls handled by cable fiber every day. And yes, it is the same network they use for their tv, internet and phone business for consumers. If the cable fiber was so inferior, why do you think a growing percentage of cell sites get back-hauled on cable fiber? (THERE's a few news article for you journalists out there). Fiber is fiber, folks. What matters is how competent the companies are at building and managing that fiber.

Until I see fiber running from the CO into my modem or my set top box, it's all HFC, baby. All of it. Period. It goes from glass to a box to coax or cat-5.