dslreports logo
site
 
    All Forums Hot Topics Gallery
spc

spacer




how-to block ads


Search Topic:
uniqs
19
share rss forum feed

hottboiinnc
ME

join:2003-10-15
Cleveland, OH

1 recommendation

reply to Dogfather

Re: How is this not a violation of copyright?

because its not replacing anything on the website. its being put along in another frame- as pictured above; or above the actual web site content.

Not everything is a violation of copyright laws. Especially this because as i stated; its not actually altering the website content.



en102
Canadian, eh?

join:2001-01-26
Valencia, CA

and where is that frame's source located ?
Its basically taking a page, and rendering it as a frame within a page. Its very borderline legal.
I.e. If my page is to be rendered as a page, and suddenly, I find my page loads as a frame with ad ridden content beside/ontop of it, this could be seen as an attempt to hijack content.

Eg. If I went to www.nsa.gov, and found the page split in 2 with a video of Obama as a good samaritan ontop, some one's going to be in trouble.
--
Canada = Hollywood North



adisor19

join:2004-10-11

1 recommendation

reply to hottboiinnc

Huh ? It IS altering the website content. When i request an HTML document, i expect that HTML document to be what i requested. If the contents change, whether it's in a separate frame or not, then we have a BIG problem.

Adi



Dogfather
Premium
join:2007-12-26
Laguna Hills, CA

1 edit
reply to hottboiinnc

said by hottboiinnc:

because its not replacing anything on the website. its being put along in another frame- as pictured above; or above the actual web site content.

Not everything is a violation of copyright laws. Especially this because as i stated; its not actually altering the website content.
Frames are a function of the HTML.

You can't have frames without modifying the HTML to add the line that executes the ISP's java which is the frame and content.

For example, if they did this to you while browsing google you request the HTML page from Google who then serves it to you.

The ISP intercepts the page, edits it adding a single line near the beginning of the HTML code saying to execute a particular javascript on the ISPs server.

The modified page is then forwarded to you at which time your browser loads the HTML, executes that java script and renders the page, along with the java code which is the frames and content.

Without stand alone separate software running on your machine, nothing can appear in the browser without being part of the HTML (aside from hacks like the GDI+ patch fixes).

Looking at copyright, it sure seems to be that it is not legal for the ISP to take Google's HTML and changing it even if it's to add this single javascript execution line without Google's permission.