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dsgc
Premium
join:2008-04-27
Calgary, AB

Telus Fiber Optic To The Home

I was speaking to a senior Telus representative the other day, who had some information that I presume most of the other techies didnt. In regards to fiber, One of the things he said was that internet speed will no longer be measured in megabits, but instead gigabits! He said that this is a few years down the road (3 years or so will be when its starting to get alot more common). Does this sound like it is too good to be true? And if anyone knows, what kind of speeds do the American companies with Fiber offer these days?



a24

@telus.net

That's total bullshit. Just look at their history: from the late 1990s till now the telus download speed has increase from 1.5 mbps to 3 mbps, and 6 mbps isn't available to most people. But gigabits?? hilarious man.


yvrwindsor

join:2008-04-28
Vancouver

FTTH (fiber to the home) or ETTS (ethernet to the suite) will be capable of delivering what the OP mentioned.

Remember the 6 mb is usually done via FTTN (fiber to the node aka the green boxes on the streets).


Gardener
Premium
join:2006-10-19
Burnaby, BC
reply to dsgc

Certainly feasible - fiber to a pole box, gigabit ethernet to perhaps sixteen houses. TV and internet, not sure what happens to POTS. Whether there's any profit in such an endeavour is another matter.



sumguy89998

@telus.net
reply to dsgc

FTTH (Fiber to the Home) is already being done in Vancouver by:

1) NOVUS - www.novusnow.ca/services/internet.php
2) UNET - www.unet.ca/broadband.html

Telus & Shaw from what I heard are testing & planning FTTH, but don't hold your breath. While the technology isn't anything new to either corporation (business' have been buying 100 Mbit & gigabit fiber links from Shaw & Telus for 8+ *YEARS*), the problem, or rather - the challenge, is that these companies will have to be able to justify a LOT of $$$ to lay fiber to everyone's home.

As such, what you'll likely see is that between now (what Novus & Unet are doing) and the next few years is that tenants of condo buildings may see fiber to the building, but your average residential house will wait many more years before fiber can reach the individual user.

Also gigabit speeds to a home is MANY years away. It'd just be too hard for Telus or Shaw to justify such high bandwidth. Think about it, so many of us could suck up 200-400+ GigaBytes of downloads/uploads per month today, yet limits are still in the 60GB range... and that's with tiny 3 or 6 Mbits/sec links, or in the case of Shaw 25 Mbits (yeah right). If people had 1Gbit links at home, that usage cap would have to jump to at least the multi-hundred, likely multi-gigaByte range for it to make any sense. So instead of 60 or 100 GByte monthly cap, you would need 1000-10,000 GigaByte caps.

You also have to think about their backbones. Many of them today still have aggregations of 10 Gigabit links (40 & 100 Gigabit technology just isn't that affordable yet - but it will after about 2011 or so). So with a 10 Gigabit pipe just how many subscribers can you jam on there? Well even if they did oversubscription at 100:1 ratios (100 customers per 1 Gigabit), you could still only provision 1,000 customers per 10Gbit link. I would imagine in Vancouver Telus has less than 100 x 10Gbit links between all their COs (Central OFfices) for DSL related networks, so even 100 x 1,000 customers is only 100,000 customers and their backbones would be filled to the hilt.

In other words, backbones have to hit multi-100 Gigabit links before we'll even see anywhere near 1Gbit speeds at our houses. The problem isn't a lack of fibers between their CO's (Central Offices), (although it is an issue to the home), but rather the end devices. On a single fiber these days they can send multiple light waves lengths (think different colors) each capable of 10Gbits/sec (or future 40 or 100 Gibit/sec), so the problem is really the (very expensive) end devices (high speed transport (SONET), switches & routers) that can handle that much data.

Cisco, the largest network vendor in the world, just announced a chassis that can "potentially" handle a few 100Gigabit links, but whose main purpose was to increase the number of 10Gbit connections it can handle. ANd each of these boxes costs a good quarter million to 1/2 million dollars. This shit ain't cheap... nevermind all the other connecting network gear. Getting your ROI (Return on Investment) from that will take MANY subscribers.

The last thing is that you also have to think about the cost per GigaByte that Telus has to pay to other providers. Remember that Canada has ZERO Tier 1 ISPs. Where the definition of "Tier1" = an ISP that does not pay anyone for peering, but rather all peers pay it. At best Telus and Bell are Tier 1.5 providers, where some small ISPs pay them to peer Internet traffic, but other Telcos do not or at least not at full price rates. In other words, our largest Telcos today still pay for every GigaByte you torrent in and out; hence the caps. If it were free my friends, caps would either not exist or be much higher. As the maximum speed links (from 10 Gigabits to 40 or 100Gigabits to eventually 1+ Terabit) increase, prices should drop, but the cycle between each 10+ fold increment is a minimum of 5-10 years.

At a guess I'd say we're at least 10 years out for Gigabit speeds to the home - at least, at current price ranges. Perhaps they will offer it, but it will cost many hundreds of $$. Be happy if you get 100 Mbits in 5 years.

Cheers,
Some-guy


pb2k

join:2005-05-30
Calgary, AB
kudos:1
Reviews:
·TELUS
reply to dsgc

Don't expect anything above 10mbps for at least 5 years. Telus is currently laying out a whole wack of cash to push 15-20mbps ADSL 2+ to 95% in urban areas, most of which will be reserved for TTV. I expect that FTTH will slowly be rolled out over the next 3 years to 'greenfield' (fiber in place) communities, but even then don't expect any miracles. ETTS is still the best product telus has, which is 25/1 mbps (I think 2mbps upload will be sorted soon), however it is only being deployed to new condo buildings with 100+ suites.

If anyone is looking at a new condo in calgary, PM me and I
'll give you a list of the current ETTS deployments.


TGumby

join:2007-08-02
Edmonton, AB
reply to dsgc

Fibre to the door is being field tested in the new areas of Edmonton and I thik Calgary. It's not something that will be easy to obtain due to the infrastructure of it all. It is possible to get gigabit connections if you've got the money, in theory, fibre has no limit to it's bandwidth.

Also, keep in mind. 2+ port do have a max potential of 45Mbps in a perfect world, I've also heard rumours of qDSL with 100Mbps speeds.



sergers

@telus.net
reply to dsgc

several new condos in vancouver have got free telus fiber for a year.

the plan telus offers is 25mbit/2mbit, but in atleast one new development, people there are maxing at more than what telus says... 40mbit/2mbit

there is no way canadian ISPs are gonna hit 1gbps+ speeds in 3 years



DarkGaiaChaos

@telus.net
reply to dsgc

said by dsgc:

I was speaking to a senior Telus representative the other day, who had some information that I presume most of the other techies didnt. In regards to fiber, One of the things he said was that internet speed will no longer be measured in megabits, but instead gigabits! He said that this is a few years down the road (3 years or so will be when its starting to get alot more common). Does this sound like it is too good to be true? And if anyone knows, what kind of speeds do the American companies with Fiber offer these days?
First of all, I don't work for TELUS nor any other corporate companies, yet I had this kind of information years ago.

Fiber cables are starting to be laid throughout all the expensive suites and possibly some private residential areas. There are no plans for FTTH, since that will cost a lot of money and there isn't enough workers in Vancouver to complete the fiber installment on time.

Residential areas will be stuck with 6.0 Mbps (ADSL2+) for many many many years. This is part of the anti-competitive scheme imposed by TELUS. The rest of the world in general will likely have at least 10 Mbps by then.

Tell your rep you ain't falling for that. And tell your rep he knows nothing about broadband. I know more than he does!!!


siberx4
Bandwidth hog

join:2004-10-19
West Vancouver, BC

Anybody know of a way to just make a particular anonymous user's posts never show up for me at all on the forums?



edmtech
Premium
join:2004-07-27
Edmonton, AB
reply to dsgc

Click the name, for example:

DarkGaiaChaos

Then click the ignore button. That's the only ignore i've found.


ninjapirate

join:2008-05-09

Telus is plans a lot of things, but they always tend to screw it up. They are in the trial stages of testing their own voip service for residential use, they offer the service to businesses already though.

It's amazing they keep a dial tone on just a LAN line.



siberx4
Bandwidth hog

join:2004-10-19
West Vancouver, BC
reply to edmtech

said by edmtech:

Click the name, for example:

DarkGaiaChaos

Then click the ignore button. That's the only ignore i've found.
Hmm, that's too bad - because I don't want to ignore every single anonymous user. Most of them contribute useful comments/questions. Only a single anonymous user contributes nothing but misguided/warped information and trolls, and that's all I'd like to block. Oh well, I guess I'll just have to keep ignoring said user in my head


Telly Boot
Premium
join:2002-05-15
Vancouver, BC
reply to dsgc

However I think he's making a fair point: that Telus does not have the funds in place to dig up every street in the Lower Mainland to install FTTH, even if municipalities were on board.
For most customers a stable 6MB down and 1MB upload is going to satisfy their needs.
My guess would be that technological advances will enable more data to be pushed down the existing copper lines, so FTTH plans/pipe dreams will eventually be dropped.
James Taylor's comments on the demise of Copper Line...

»www.youtube.com/watch?v=jKDEyg1b···=related

--
Dawn,n,The time when men of reason go to bed. (Ambrose Bierce.)


netwerk2
Premium
join:2003-02-03
BC

They can hang the fiber in the air just as easy as copper