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Airwolf
Premium
join:2001-10-30
Windsor, ON
Reviews:
·Cogeco Cable

1 edit

Headphones Driver Size vs Frequency Range.

I'm looking to replace my iPod headphones 'cause frankly they suck with handling base.

Usually when I look for headphones for my computer for gaming/music I looked at driver size; the bigger = better concept.

However, I'm also taking notice of frequency range.
i.e.

7Hz-22KHz
8Hz-22Khz
10Hz-22Khz
12Hz-22Khz
12Hz-24Khz

...etc

Then I noticed these earbuds (I know earbuds are generally not favoured for health reasons)

Panasonic RP-HJE300
10.7mm driver
6Hz-24kHz

Sony MDRE10LP
13.5mm driver
18Hz-22kHz

What's better to look into, higher driver size, larger frequency range or something in between?

Regardless of earbuds or overear headphones.


Zero Gravity
Next to Arch Stanton
Premium
join:2002-04-30
Top Floor
I have a set of these that I use with my Samsung P2. If you want some bottom end bass, then these will put a subwoofer into your head.


ArthurS
Watch Those Blinking Lights
Premium
join:2000-10-28
Hamilton, ON
reply to Airwolf
While it may seem simplistic to think bigger driver size will give you better bass, you get what you pay for with headphones or earphones, and the ones that come with your iPod really aren't that great in this regard. Get yourself a decent earphone from Shure or Etymotic, and you'll hear a significant difference in the bass response, regardless of what the published specs (which are marketing drivel anyway without the appropriate measurement parameters).

The other problem is that we as humans not only hear bass with our ears, but feel it as well with our body. No earphone or headphone, no matter how expensive, will substitute for our felt perception of bass. This is why in some designs for headphones/in-ear monitor systems, I add bass shakers to an isolation platform or chair to restore the sense of bass without blowing your eardrums out. »www.thebuttkicker.com/


Jacob22
Premium
join:2006-05-10
Eagle River, AK
reply to Airwolf
I just purchased the Shure SE530s yesterday and cannot wait for them to come in. They seem to be an excellent earbud.


The Monkey
I like bananas
Premium
join:2000-10-08
New York, NY
reply to Airwolf
Head on over to »www.head-fi.org, they'll get you sorted out.

HeadRoom at »www.headphone.com also has some nice frequency response tools and is a great retailer.
--
The Monkey

gallowsroad

join:2004-08-09
Jenks, OK

1 edit
reply to Airwolf
Size of the driver isn't an indicator of sound quality. Implementation is everything.

Neither is frequency response unless you know what the +/- dB deviation over the stated frequency range is.

As an example, some of the best phones you can buy are Etymotic in ear models, with custom molded fit. Expensive and tiny, but they sound awesome.

You can also buy really large headphones with amazing published specs and huge drivers and have them sound like crap.

If you are going for over the ear or on ear phones, Sony makes some better ones, Sennheiser, Grado...it is really best to be able to listen to some of them.

Are you looking for high quality music reproduction? Gaming?

Edit: I second The Monkey's links. I bought my DAC and a pair of Sennheiser HD650s from Headroom, and they are fantastic. I had some detailed questions before buying and one minor tech support issue after the gear arrived, and they were right on it.

--
Ha ha haaaaaaa....ever get the feeling you've been cheated?

- John Lydon, last Sex Pistols show


disconnected

@snet.net
reply to The Monkey
said by The Monkey:

Head on over to »www.head-fi.org, they'll get you sorted out.

HeadRoom at »www.headphone.com also has some nice frequency response tools and is a great retailer.
They have an interesting selection of phones, but when I read this:

"If we absolutely had to criticize, we'd say that the SE530's upper highs might be the slightest hint 'rolled-off' for ultra-picky, demanding audiophile types. "

And saw the frequency response graph rolling off as much as 10dB, the above paragraph lost all credibility with me. Their definition of "slight hint of rolloff" means -10dB. Holy Toledo!


The Monkey
I like bananas
Premium
join:2000-10-08
New York, NY
said by disconnected :

said by The Monkey:

Head on over to »www.head-fi.org, they'll get you sorted out.

HeadRoom at »www.headphone.com also has some nice frequency response tools and is a great retailer.
They have an interesting selection of phones, but when I read this:

"If we absolutely had to criticize, we'd say that the SE530's upper highs might be the slightest hint 'rolled-off' for ultra-picky, demanding audiophile types. "

And saw the frequency response graph rolling off as much as 10dB, the above paragraph lost all credibility with me. Their definition of "slight hint of rolloff" means -10dB. Holy Toledo!
Believe your ears, not graphs. A FR provides a nice correlative relationship to what you're hearing, but that's about it. As for headroom's credibility, I believe they know a lot more about phones than most.


ArthurS
Watch Those Blinking Lights
Premium
join:2000-10-28
Hamilton, ON
reply to Airwolf
Keep in mind that the response of an earphone varies significantly depending on the shape and size of the person's ear canal, along with it's associated resonances in the upper midrange. Overlay that on top of any earphone frequency response curve, and things start to look ugly, yet sound ok to the "average" listener. I wouldn't put too much stock in someone's subjective opinions about how one earphone compares to another. Test it out for yourself before spending a lot of money!