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espaeth
Digital Plumber
Premium,MVM
join:2001-04-21
Minneapolis, MN
kudos:2

1 recommendation

reply to nasadude

Re: A supporting commentary to McDowells

said by nasadude:

regardless of which "side" one is on, the fact seems to remain that the simplest way to solve bandwidth problems (if there really are bandwidth problems) is TO ADD MORE BANDWIDTH.
That's like saying the solution to your debt problem is to acquire more money. Although technically correct, it ignores the constraints of reality that would stop you from doing so.

Case in point: name all of the full DOCSIS 3.0 (ie, not pre-cert) cable modems that are currently being mass produced today.


funchords
Hello
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join:2001-03-11
Yarmouth Port, MA
kudos:6
said by espaeth:

Case in point: name all of the full DOCSIS 3.0 (ie, not pre-cert) cable modems that are currently being mass produced today.
Or 802.11N wi-fi gear (not DRAFT)
--
Robb Topolski -= funchords.com =- Hillsboro, Oregon
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espaeth
Digital Plumber
Premium,MVM
join:2001-04-21
Minneapolis, MN
kudos:2
said by funchords:

said by espaeth:

Case in point: name all of the full DOCSIS 3.0 (ie, not pre-cert) cable modems that are currently being mass produced today.
Or 802.11N wi-fi gear (not DRAFT)
That's not quite the same argument. The 11N standard is baked out enough that equipment will, in all probability, be firmware upgradeable to the final standard. The worst case scenario is that you end up just like the Cisco customers who bought power over Ethernet hardware before the 802.3af standard was ratified -- you can still use the hardware, but you won't be able to purchase any new devices to attach to it. Considering 11N draft APs are going for sub-$100 and NICs are dirt cheap, the hardship is also minimal.

Right now the DOCSIS 3.0 trial hardware is spendy because it's being produced in limited production runs, and modems like the DPC2505 that Comcast is using here in MN only have multiple downstream tuners combined with a single upstream tuner. Once upstream channel bonding is fully adopted and product actually starts rolling off assembly lines, the DPC2505 will simply be a $600 piece of dumpster fodder. Not exactly the kind of hardware you want to start rolling en-mass.


funchords
Hello
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join:2001-03-11
Yarmouth Port, MA
kudos:6
holy crap!

So what's the bet, that they're not really going to do upstream channel bonding RSN?


espaeth
Digital Plumber
Premium,MVM
join:2001-04-21
Minneapolis, MN
kudos:2

1 edit
said by funchords:

So what's the bet, that they're not really going to do upstream channel bonding RSN?
They're certainly getting closer. If you look at the certification results here there were a bunch of CPE models that received D3.0 full certification in May & June. With any luck those should start turning into assembly line production runs soon.

The big issue right now is there is only one CMTS that has full D3 certification with upstream bonding support, and that's from Casa Systems. Unfortunately Cisco and Motorola seem to dominate the US cable modem head-end market...