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NormanS
I gave her time to steal my mind away
Premium,MVM
join:2001-02-14
San Jose, CA
kudos:11
Reviews:
·SONIC.NET
·Pacific Bell - SBC
reply to TheSaint

Re: Comcast is using Sandvine to manage P2P Connections

said by TheSaint:

Comcast seems to be cutting off bit torrent traffic on private trackers, or at least in this area. I've just signed up for Comcast HSI. Speedtest.net and the like all come out with decent speeds, but whenever I use a private tracker the connections keep on resetting.
Not having used private trackers on a Comcast connection, I can't directly address that. But, in order to distinguish between public and private trackers, Comcast would have to take the time to build up a database of which trackers are public, and which are private. A rather costly, and, thus, unlikely activity on the part of Comcast. Without that knowledge, how would the Sandvine appliance distinguish between the two?
Public trackers seem to work just fine with upload and download. What is worse than just the private trackers not working, I've noticed that when utorrent is running webpages also take MUCH, MUCH, longer to resolve.
Having used my sister's Comcast connection to download fansubbed anime, I can assure you that my usage never adversely affected my sister, or her family. The thing is, I was always "upload impaired" with uTorrent while working her connection. I never pestered my brother-in-law about poking holes through his NAT appliance. I just downloaded until complete, but kept the tracker until I could return to my DSL connection and seed until reaching 1.050 (which is where I have set uTorrent to automatically stop uploading).

BTW, on my DSL connection, I used to throttle upload way back (maybe half, or so), when I had a standard, bridged DSL modem. I have since replaced that with a SpeedStream 4100 DSL modem, which, reportedly, performs outbound ACK packet prioritization. And added a D-Link DIR-655, with the default QoS setting. Although my connection theoretically can sustain 39kB/s upload, I still throttle it back. I have uTorrent set for 29kB/s upload.

I would strongly advise you to consider the advice of funchords See Profile. He knows way more about how this stuff works than I do, and way more about how cable (in general) and Comcast (in particular) work.
--
Norman
~Oh Lord, why have you come
~To Konnyu, with the Lion and the Drum


TruSm0ke

join:2005-07-21
Michigan

I have my torrent upload speed set at 15kb/s.

I thought upload was the speed you alloted to seeding. Is there any other benefit to using a higher upload speed? Does it improve your download speed?



NormanS
I gave her time to steal my mind away
Premium,MVM
join:2001-02-14
San Jose, CA
kudos:11
Reviews:
·SONIC.NET
·Pacific Bell - SBC

1 recommendation

said by TruSm0ke:

I have my torrent upload speed set at 15kb/s.
That should work for alleviating surfing issues.
I thought upload was the speed you alloted to seeding. Is there any other benefit to using a higher upload speed? Does it improve your download speed?
I have never noticed any improvement in download speed with higher upload; but I have only used public trackers, and I suspect that any benefit would only apply to private trackers.

My nominal DSL upload is 512kbps, but there is a 15% overhead, so actual speed is closer to 425kbps. AT&T does not "overprovision", as some other ISPs do. Because of my nominal UL, uTorrent pegs my max upload at 43kB/s. By rough calculation, I estimate that it is closer to 39kB/s. Because saturating the upload bandwidth has an adverse affect on other Internet activity, it is usually advisable to throttle upload instead of running at the maximum. However, most of the adverse effects are due to packet contention. Delaying outbound ACK packets, which happens on a saturated upload, slows web surfing, and the like.

My modem, as I have stated, reportedly prioritizes outbound ACK packets, over other outbound packets, which would also alleviate the effects of upload congestion. And, in addition, my D-Link DIR-655 has some kind of QoS algorithm. The result is that I don't suffer the ill effects of upload saturation as severely as would be the case with no QoS of any kind.

Other than completing the unity ratio expected of BT P2P faster, I can't think of any reason for faster upload. I think funchords See Profile has suggested that, even for DSL connections, which are better able to handle P2P bandwidth demand, that throttling back is "kinder" to the network. While the 29kB/s that I am using is probably a killer on a cable plant, it doesn't seem so hard on DSL. However, if funchords See Profile were to suggest that I should cut back to 66% (26kB/s), instead of my current 75% (29kB/s), I'd do it. As a member of a larger community, I should minimize any adverse impact my activity would have on other members of the community.
--
Norman
~Oh Lord, why have you come
~To Konnyu, with the Lion and the Drum


funchords
Hello
Premium,MVM
join:2001-03-11
Yarmouth Port, MA
kudos:6
reply to TruSm0ke

said by TruSm0ke:

I have my torrent upload speed set at 15kb/s.

I thought upload was the speed you alloted to seeding. Is there any other benefit to using a higher upload speed? Does it improve your download speed?
Yes. The BitTorrent is a tit-for-tat protocol that links the best sharers (uploaders) together for the fastest transfers. If you're only running 1 torrent at a time, 15 KB/s is plenty. I wouldn't run more than 2 torrents at a time on a Comcast connection, and with 2 torrents you'd want to set your upload limit to around 30 KB/s (explanation: it works out to 3 slots per upload, 5 KB/s per slot). During prime-time, I would (and did) run only 1 torrent at 15 KB/s.
--
Robb Topolski -= funchords.com =- Hillsboro, Oregon
More fun, more features, Join BroadbandReports.com, it's free...

abcstore
See Store For Details
Premium
join:2001-12-21
Richmond, VA

1 edit
reply to NormanS

said by NormanS:

said by TruSm0ke:

I have my torrent upload speed set at 15kb/s.
That should work for alleviating surfing issues.
Having upload set to 28_k_bit on a 8/2Mbit pipe kills the whole thing almost completely. No ping, no DNS, no surfing.

ABC


funchords
Hello
Premium,MVM
join:2001-03-11
Yarmouth Port, MA
kudos:6

1 edit

said by abcstore:

Having upload set to 28_k_bit on a 8/2Mbit pipe kills the whole thing almost completely. No ping, no DNS, no surfing.
Are you working through a router? If so, try disabling DHT in your P2P client and close it. Reset your router (power off and on), wait for a few moments, then restart your bittorrent client.

If that helps, your router cannot handle the high number of connections that DHT creates. Turning DHT off shouldn't affect you badly, as DHT's main purpose is to function as a backup tracker.
--
Robb Topolski -= funchords.com =- Hillsboro, Oregon
More features, more fun, Join BroadbandReports.com, it's free...


NormanS
I gave her time to steal my mind away
Premium,MVM
join:2001-02-14
San Jose, CA
kudos:11
Reviews:
·SONIC.NET
·Pacific Bell - SBC

1 edit
reply to abcstore

said by abcstore:

Having upload set to 28_k_bit on a 8/2Mbit pipe kills the whole thing almost completely. No ping, no DNS, no surfing.
I've only got 3/0.5 Mb/s, but letting the upload run at 39 kB/s (yes, that's Bytes!) does not hurt DNS, or surfing. Ping only suffers slightly. The worst effect is on streaming video (gets very choppy).

It helps that the router (D-Link DIR-655) does QoS, and the DSL modem (SpeedStream 4100) performs ACK packet prioritization.

P.S. I normally run the upload throttled back to 29 kB/s.

--
Norman
~Oh Lord, why have you come
~To Konnyu, with the Lion and the Drum