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alottabull

join:2004-09-04
Cen Tex

2 edits

Remove paint from old house and prep for new paint.

What is the best way to remove old paint from an older wood siding house or have someone remove it? I have been looking around at some of the techniques and some have used sandblasting with walnut shells, pressure washing and old fashioned scraping. My question is how would others approach this and how long do you think it would take to scrape it? I have read of several downfalls to each different method and was wondering what the consensus is of best price and of best result?

I have a house that was built in the 50's on pier and beam and has a wood siding on about 8' on each side. The house is fairly small and is rectangle at about 40' by 30'. The paint is cracking and peeling in some places with minimal paint coverage but other places seem to have a very thick layer of paint that seems to peel off in an elastic form.


jack b
Gone Fishing
Premium,MVM
join:2000-09-08
Cape Cod
kudos:1
Hands down, the best way by far, is to have someone else do it.

Otherwise there are a few variables: Is it smooth clap board siding or painted / textured shakes?
For smooth surfaces I would recommend using a disc-sander.
For textured shakes, blasting would probably work best.

If the paint is peeling, there is either a moisture problem or the surface was never properly prepped to begin with.

--
~Help Find a Cure for Cancer~
~Proud Member of Team Discovery ~

alottabull

join:2004-09-04
Cen Tex

2 edits
Thanks for the quick reply. Maybe I can grab some pics tonight. It is a smooth wood siding (the surface is smooth but it is individual 8" or so - there are two sizes- pieces of wood overlapped). I believe the surface wasn't properly prepped previously as it seems some areas have thick coats like it has been painted multiple times and other areas are very very thin and peeling like they painted over what was already peeling or they scraped a small little area or something. What type of sanding wheel would you use?

Edit: I found this pic on the internet, it is a bad pic but my siding seems to be shaped the same.


jack b
Gone Fishing
Premium,MVM
join:2000-09-08
Cape Cod
kudos:1
reply to alottabull
If you're doing the work, a disc sander would be fine.

Example: »www.amazon.com/Makita-GV5000-5-I···9&sr=1-7

Be sure to get yourself eye protection goggles and a HEPA 1/2 face respirator (for dust)
--
~Help Find a Cure for Cancer~
~Proud Member of Team Discovery ~

alottabull

join:2004-09-04
Cen Tex
Any recommendations on what grit paper to use?

tcope
Premium
join:2003-05-07
Sandy, UT
kudos:2

4 edits
reply to alottabull
Click for full size
Chipping of paint (before)
Click for full size
After sanding
Click for full size
After sanding/painting
About 2 years ago I did exactly this to my house in Florida as I was selling it. Let me tel you, it is not easy task!

The best method I found was to use a disk sander. I bought one for about $20 at Harbor Freight and it was worth it's weight in gold. The only problem was buying sanding disks for it. Sears was selling off it's stock of them so I bought like 20 boxes! I probably spent around $150 in sanding disks.

Back to the task at hand... I used the sander to remove all of the rough patches and then painted them with primer and a top coat. It took about a month of working most every day for 8 hours to get my house done. How much would this have cost me to have someone else do? You do the math... it would not have been cheap.

I did not remove all of the paint. Rather, I feathered the areas where it was chipped away. It was nasty, grueling work. If memory serves me correctly, I used either 50 or 60 grit for heavy removal and then 80 or 100 for light work.

alottabull

join:2004-09-04
Cen Tex
That is great info, thanks! Yours looks to have been a bigger project than mine would be. We have a perfect rectangle house and also have access to a spray paint machine which my dad would have more know how to operate than I will. If I choose to sand it myself I will probably be solo but he will help with the repainting. My house is only about 1200 sq ft and only has the wooden siding 8' tall on the sides. I figured it would go through quite a few sanding discs.


StepR
Code Warrior
Premium
join:2000-11-06
Elgin, IL
reply to alottabull
I found the best way to remove paint is a heating pad in one hand and a straight scraper in the other. The electric pad works better than the heat gun since the heat gets concentrated. Another good tool is a tungsten blade scraper.


Cho Baka
Premium,MVM
join:2000-11-23
there
kudos:2
reply to alottabull
There may be lead in that paint, so be careful when removing it.
--
Striving for Parfection.


ptrowski
Got Helix?
Premium
join:2005-03-14
Putnam, CT
kudos:4
reply to alottabull
Funny you should mention this, I am doing it to my house.

I went with the Silent Paint Remover after seeing it on This Old House.
»www.thisoldhouse.com/toh/article···,00.html

Link to the paint remover.
»www.silentpaintremover.com/spr/index.htm

It works very well, and the more paint the better. Hold it for about 20 seconds, the paint bubbles, and then I use one of their scrapers to pull it off. It is slow going, but it works very well. I use a small Wagner digital heat gun for the areas by the trim.
--
"A religious war is like children fighting over who has the strongest imaginary friend."

Have you been touched by his noodly appendage? »www.venganza.org

alottabull

join:2004-09-04
Cen Tex

1 edit
I saw that silent paint remover. I figured that would be much slower than the sander but it would probably remove more paint. Seems like I should go with the sander for speed but I don't know how it compares to the silent paint remover. It also seemed like the package to include the arm and everything is expensive. I talked to a guy last night that does sandblasting and he said it would be about $1500 but this method worries me, damage wise. I think I am going to buy some sanding discs and do an area like that to see how it goes. I read on the silent paint remover website that sanding creates the dust which can be harmful.


ptrowski
Got Helix?
Premium
join:2005-03-14
Putnam, CT
kudos:4
Understandable. I have the track for it, but don't use it to be honest. I went this route as the wood below is almost all old cedar and I did not want to damage it by sanding. Plus who knows what is in some of the lower levels of paint. Less particulate in the air for me to inhale.

Depending on your schedule on when you want to start I could let you borrow it.

alottabull

join:2004-09-04
Cen Tex
That would be cool. I was thinking about the inhalants myself. I am guessing you are using it now? How long does it seem to be taking? I don't want to have the neighbors trying to pin their sickness on me! Maybe I can try the sanding on a small portion and you can let me know about how the silent paint remover goes and I can make a decision from there. My wood is nothing special so I don't run the risk of damaging wood that is of great value. We have replaced a couple of small sections ourselves already anyway.


taxpro

join:2001-09-03
Hopkins, MN
reply to alottabull
The guy who wrote this painted our house and did an excellent job.

It has a wealth of info:
»rogcad.com/painting/contractors/index.htm