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R4M0N
Brazilian Soccer Ownz Joo

join:2000-10-04
Glen Allen, VA

3 edits

Water Heater Transport

This might be a dumb question, but it's something I'll have to deal with sooner or later. Try not to laugh too hard:

Can I transport an electric water heater on its side from the store to my home or should it be transported upright? I don't see a problem with transporting it on its side unless there are structural issues to be concerned about.

What do you guys say?

[Edited to specify the type of water heater]



steve1515
Premium
join:2000-08-07
Peabody, MA

I've always brought them home laying on the side, and they've worked.



Kringle
Dr.D
Premium
join:2004-02-27
Pierrefonds, QC
kudos:3

1 recommendation

reply to R4M0N

I've always heard that water heaters are supposed to be transported vertically because the dip tubes and anodes can be over stressed in a horizontal situation and either bend or break. This obviously depends on how bumpy the road is between the retailer and your house and how smooth the ride is in your vehicle.



slash
Premium,MVM
join:2001-03-01
Boston

^^^ What he said



steve1515
Premium
join:2000-08-07
Peabody, MA
reply to Kringle

said by Kringle:

I've always heard that water heaters are supposed to be transported vertically because the dip tubes and anodes can be over stressed in a horizontal situation and either bend or break. This obviously depends on how bumpy the road is between the retailer and your house and how smooth the ride is in your vehicle.
You're right, but usually the only way to get it home is on its side. So, upright if possible, but on its side if you must.


jack b
Gone Fishing
Premium,MVM
join:2000-09-08
Cape Cod
kudos:1
reply to R4M0N

You should be fine, but be a little bit careful. Just don't do obvious stuff like dent the side of the tank or bang the thermostat or T&P valve, or drop it taking it out of the vehicle.
--
~Help Find a Cure for Cancer~
~Proud Member of Team Discovery ~



cdru
Go Colts
Premium,MVM
join:2003-05-14
Fort Wayne, IN
kudos:7
reply to Kringle

said by Kringle:

I've always heard that water heaters are supposed to be transported vertically because the dip tubes and anodes can be over stressed in a horizontal situation and either bend or break. This obviously depends on how bumpy the road is between the retailer and your house and how smooth the ride is in your vehicle.
I replaced my dip tube earlier this year. It was flexible enough that it wouldn't have been a problem bouncing around. If you are still concerned and need to transport it laying down, rotate it so that the inlet is on the bottom. Minimize the amount it would need to bend if you went over a bump.

At the same time that I replaced the dip tube I also grabbed a new anode rod. Unless you live on a suspension test track, you aren't going to bend it just from driving home with it horizontally.

robbin
Premium,MVM
join:2000-09-21
Leander, TX
kudos:1
reply to R4M0N

I say read the instructions on the carton. I always transport and handle them according to what is written. If it is OK to transport on the side, the carton will show that.



dbennett1106

join:2000-05-28
Ukiah, CA
reply to R4M0N

You can transport a GAS water heater in its side without any problem. Nothing that will break on transportation.



R4M0N
Brazilian Soccer Ownz Joo

join:2000-10-04
Glen Allen, VA

1 edit
reply to cdru

said by cdru:

I replaced my dip tube earlier this year. It was flexible enough that it wouldn't have been a problem bouncing around. If you are still concerned and need to transport it laying down, rotate it so that the inlet is on the bottom. Minimize the amount it would need to bend if you went over a bump.

At the same time that I replaced the dip tube I also grabbed a new anode rod. Unless you live on a suspension test track, you aren't going to bend it just from driving home with it horizontally.
Those are some great suggestions, Thanks.


R4M0N
Brazilian Soccer Ownz Joo

join:2000-10-04
Glen Allen, VA
reply to robbin

said by robbin:

I say read the instructions on the carton. I always transport and handle them according to what is written. If it is OK to transport on the side, the carton will show that.
I was planning on that already, this question is just in case transporting it upright is not a viable option.

I hadn't thought about the dip tube and the anode rod. That's why I love this place. Many heads thinking are a lot better than one.


neonhomer
KK4BFN
Premium
join:2004-01-27
Edgewater, FL
reply to R4M0N

I transported my new water heater on the roof of my minivan, and had no issues with it. Of course I wasn't going too far, and didn't drive down a rutted dirt road either!

If it's that much of an issue, just remove the dip tube and anode before transport...



tp0d
yabbazooie
Premium
join:2001-02-13
Carnegie, PA
kudos:5

1 edit
reply to R4M0N


Laying the water heater down will not hurt a thing. Just be careful when moving it out of the vehicle, that you dont drop it on a corner. This does the most damage.

One other word of advise when installing ANY new heater. The Federal gov has enacted new scalding guidelines for manufacturers, causing them to modify their dip tubes. I highly recommend to take your tube out before installation, and check if the end is closed. If it is, either remove the end plug, or cut it off as close as possible to the end. This new 'feature' causes me so much headache in my work. It can cause a major dilution of hot temps, and customers that installed the same style heater have 20-30% less hot, and they think they have a bad control.

Just for reference, I am a service agent for a number of large HWH manufacturers..

-j
--
if it aint broke, tweak it!!
currently on FiOS (kick aZZ!)



R4M0N
Brazilian Soccer Ownz Joo

join:2000-10-04
Glen Allen, VA

2 edits

Tanks for the tip!

said by tp0d:

Laying the water heater down will not hurt a thing. Just be careful when moving it out of the vehicle, that you dont drop it on a corner. This does the most damage.

One other word of advise when installing ANY new heater. The Federal gov has enacted new scalding guidelines for manufacturers, causing them to modify their dip tubes. I highly recommend to take your tube out before installation, and check if the end is closed. If it is, either remove the end plug, or cut it off as close as possible to the end. This new 'feature' causes me so much headache in my work. It can cause a major dilution of hot temps, and customers that installed the same style heater have 20-30% less hot, and they think they have a bad control.

Just for reference, I am a service agent for a number of large HWH manufacturers..

-j


jester121
Premium
join:2003-08-09
Lake Zurich, IL
reply to R4M0N

Related question -- what to do with the old hot water heater? Should I take it to a scrap/salvage yard, and if so is it worth anything? Or do I have to pay someone to take it away and dispose of it properly?

It's less than 10 years old, just very hard water here and I think it was a cheapo model.


robbin
Premium,MVM
join:2000-09-21
Leander, TX
kudos:1

Taking it to a scrap/salvage yard (metal recycler) is disposing of it properly. No, it's not really worth anything.



jester121
Premium
join:2003-08-09
Lake Zurich, IL

Thanks. Never seen the inside of a HWH and didn't know if there is copper or diamonds or M&Ms rattling around in there... figured it was worth checking!



dosdoxies
Premium
join:2004-12-15
Wallingford, PA
reply to jester121

Don't know how it is where you live but I've heard stories about township plumbing inspectors seeing old water heaters by your curb and then checking to see if a permit was pulled for the job. I always put my old one in the back of my truck and take it to work for the scrap man. YMMV.



jester121
Premium
join:2003-08-09
Lake Zurich, IL

Uh-huh, same here -- I'll be smuggling it out under a tarp or something....



tp0d
yabbazooie
Premium
join:2001-02-13
Carnegie, PA
kudos:5

If you do decide to take it to the junkyard, make it easier on yourself by:

removing the thermostat (these are almost always aluminum, junk man will give you a dollar or two if it is seperate from the heater)

remove all non-ferrous metals from the heater, like the relief valve and copper connections from the top of the heater. Removing the drain valve is good too, unless its plastic, then it doesnt matter.

just a little tip..

just an fyi, most junkyards give 5-8$ for a water heater.

-j