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beck
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join:2002-01-29
On The Road
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Cost for adding 220V for dryer?

A friend wants to add a dryer to the basement. Another one has an electric dryer they want to get rid of.

Anyone have an approximate cost to add the 220 outlet? The house has a breaker box with lots of room. The breaker box was put in 2 years ago. They already have 220 for an electric hot water heater.

This would be in Minneapolis, MN.
--
Some people are like slinkies - not really good for much.
But they bring a smile to your face when pushed down the stairs.



davidg
Good Bye My Friend
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join:2002-06-15
none

1 edit

depends, could be under 100.00 if the panel is really close, or it could be over 1000.00 or more if it is a long/difficult run. the above prices are for the labor, parts will be around 100.00 or so with a longer run higher for the wire.
--
Lack of Preparation on YOUR Part does NOT Constitute an Emergency on Mine!



Greg_Z
Premium
join:2001-08-08
Springfield, IL
reply to beck

To do it yourself, figure around $40 for wire, aprx. $25-30 for breaker, outlet parts around another $30-40, so about $200 with Labor.



beck
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reply to beck

Thanks! I'll give her the ballpark figure of maybe $200-$250 or so. Then she can look to find an electrician (or someone) to put it in. Where the dryer would be is about 10-12 feet from the breaker box in the basement.
--
Some people are like slinkies - not really good for much.
But they bring a smile to your face when pushed down the stairs.



Greg_Z
Premium
join:2001-08-08
Springfield, IL

You could do it, figure for the time it takes to get someone out there, you could of had it done by the time you came here to post & ask.



beck
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reply to beck

I can't do it because I'd probably kill myself in that breaker panel. lol! Better for the world if I stay far away from breaker panels.
--
Some people are like slinkies - not really good for much.
But they bring a smile to your face when pushed down the stairs.



Greg_Z
Premium
join:2001-08-08
Springfield, IL

Just remember to remove all Jewelry, use the One handed rule when working in the panel, and always if you can, cover the metal of the Screwdriver with Rubber, then Electric tape to allow only the tip showing.

I am comfortable with working on mine, just that you need to take time & relax. As for connecting the wires to the breakers, easier to do it with them out of the panel, then you just make sure when pushing into place, that the breaker is off, and if you want to, shut off the Main breaker to the whole home.

Black & Decker has a great Electric book avail, which you can pick up @ Lowe's, Home Depot, or any Book store.


public

join:2002-01-19
Santa Clara, CA
reply to beck

said by beck:

I can't do it because I'd probably kill myself in that breaker panel. lol! Better for the world if I stay far away from breaker panels.
Does the panel have a main breaker?


Greg_Z
Premium
join:2001-08-08
Springfield, IL

If it does not, the main will be outside like in warmer climates. Only in the Snowbelt for places like Mobile Homes, is the Main Disco outside.


wth
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join:2002-02-20
Iowa City,IA
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reply to beck

said by beck:

Another one has an electric dryer they want to get rid of.
You sure this dryer is worth the cost of adding a 220v outlet? Also, if there's never been a gas dryer, an exhaust vent will be needed.

PhilAIV

join:2002-02-16
Carrollton, GA

said by wth:

said by beck:

Another one has an electric dryer they want to get rid of.
You sure this dryer is worth the cost of adding a 220v outlet? Also, if there's never been a gas dryer, an exhaust vent will be needed.
Exhaust vents are required for electric and gas dryers.


beck
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reply to beck

Any dryer is worth the cost to install the 220 imho. Eventually it pays for itself instead of running to the laundromat. If the dryer breaks, you get another one.

Have no idea where the main breaker is. But truely, I don't trust them anyway. Many years ago I was taking a 220 line out. The main breaker was off. ALL the breakers were off. Easy to pull out, right? I got blown across that basement. Whoever wired that 220 made it stay hot somehow by not going through the main breaker. So, I learned my lesson. I stay away.

Oh, and there is a metal vent already, just waiting. Just no electric or gas hookup for a dryer. But a vent pipe is not a big deal to install if you need one anyway. Biggest pain is cutting the hole in the wall.
--
Some people are like slinkies - not really good for much.
But they bring a smile to your face when pushed down the stairs.



Greg_Z
Premium
join:2001-08-08
Springfield, IL

That is why you always use a Voltmeter to check before working on the circuit. We always carried a Flukes & quick test to check circuits before even going into them.


PhilAIV

join:2002-02-16
Carrollton, GA
reply to beck

said by beck:

Any dryer is worth the cost to install the 220 imho. Eventually it pays for itself instead of running to the laundromat. If the dryer breaks, you get another one.
Totally agree. I've been meaning to do the same thing (install another 220 outlet), but how been putting it off. Your post has reminded me and I'll have to get off my butt and do it. (I only have to run about ten feet of wire along with the outlet) Although when my electric dryers give out, I'm switching to gas because the apartment in my basement has a gas dryer and it can dry clothes in a little over 20 minutes (probably scorches them a little in the process though, lol.)

Langning
Premium
join:2003-04-28
Marlborough, MA
reply to Greg_Z

Using a volt meter is not safe enough. Just a couple weeks ago, I used my volt meter on a switch. I put 1 prone on black and another prone on the ground screw. Somehow that was enough to send spark flying and melted the 1 prone on positive...

The detection type is better that you don't have to
touch any wire...



mitchell

join:2002-06-21
Darlington, SC

Did you have the meter set for measuring Ohms?


HarryH3
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join:2005-02-21
kudos:3
reply to Langning

Yep, I'm thinking that the meter was set to measure either Ohms or Amps. Ouch! When set to measure Amps, the resistance through the meter is very close to zero...



Greg_Z
Premium
join:2001-08-08
Springfield, IL
reply to Langning

You did not check the setting on the meter. This is a reason that you should have your head where it belongs before working on something that can kill you. Not to say that a homeowner should avoid taking on small tasks, but you should should always place caution before the task.



Greg_Z
Premium
join:2001-08-08
Springfield, IL
reply to HarryH3

Why where you measuring Amps? Ohms are measured Parallel on the circuit, Series for measuring Volts & Amps. Next time check your meter settings & cable hook up.


Langning
Premium
join:2003-04-28
Marlborough, MA
reply to Greg_Z


No, I used a "4-way circuit tester"... There are 3 colored-screws on the switch -- 1 copper-colored, 1 no-color, & 1 green. I don't recall the switch was on or not (more likely it was on). At first, I put 1 prone on the no-color screw, and 2nd on copper screw. The tester lighted up.

Then for whatever reason, I took the 1st prone away from the no-color screw and touched the green (ground) screw on the opposite side of the switch. Next thing was the sparks that melted the prone on the copper-colored screw and blackened the switch and tripped the breaker.



cowboyro
Premium
join:2000-10-11
Shelton, CT
reply to Greg_Z

said by Greg_Z:

Why where you measuring Amps? Ohms are measured Parallel on the circuit, Series for measuring Volts & Amps. Next time check your meter settings & cable hook up.
Ummm.. voltage is being measured in parallel, current (amps) in series... And you never, ever measure resistance (ohms) on any kind of energized circuit.


Greg_Z
Premium
join:2001-08-08
Springfield, IL
reply to Langning

Only good for a spot check, but always use a Voltmeter for true checking of any volts.



Greg_Z
Premium
join:2001-08-08
Springfield, IL
reply to cowboyro

Okay, corrected, and as for Ohms, yes that is correct always check on a Deenergized circuit.



Splitpair
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join:2000-07-29
Cow Towne
kudos:3
reply to beck

said by beck:

I can't do it because I'd probably kill myself in that breaker panel. lol! Better for the world if I stay far away from breaker panels.
Good idea! If one is not totally comfortable working with power they are best served by having a professional do the work. Your time is money and the value of your safety will easily exceed any charges a pro will bill you for.

Wayne
--
If you cannot fix it with a buttset and some beanies you ain't a technician.


nunya
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reply to beck

I 2nd Wayne. If you aren't comfortable, don't bother. Most people have no business in a service panel.
If the basement is unfinished, and the dryer is reasonably close to the panel, look for it to cost between $175 - 275.
--
Looks like Reverend Wright got his wish - God Damn America.


patcat88

join:2002-04-05
Jamaica, NY
kudos:1
reply to PhilAIV

said by PhilAIV:

Exhaust vents are required for electric and gas dryers.
But the electric clothes drier venting into the home is a mainstay of the poorman's energy savings plan. In the summer you wheel the drier outside on a romex extension cord, in the winter you roll it into the garage then the basement (same floor/sloped landscaping). The pros here must have had a heart attack.