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zod5000

join:2003-10-21
Victoria, BC
Reviews:
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WPA2 is fine.

I use WPA2-AES with a randomly generated longass password. I figure it'll be a few more years for someone to crack that.

I suppose though, because cpu/power continutes to increase, the ease of brute force attacks gets easier. I guess they should start working on a WPA3.


KodiacZiller
Premium
join:2008-09-04
73368
kudos:2
said by zod5000:

I use WPA2-AES with a randomly generated longass password. I figure it'll be a few more years for someone to crack that.

I suppose though, because cpu/power continutes to increase, the ease of brute force attacks gets easier. I guess they should start working on a WPA3.
Nah, a raw brute force on, say, 128 bit AES would take longer than the age of the universe (assuming a reasonably strong key). Then you have the Von Neumann-Landauer Limit to contend with. This principle says that it would take an inordinate amount of energy to do -- more than is available to anyone. Energy is a big problem with brute forcing large keys. There is simply no way around the 2nd law of thermodynamics (unless you want to take into account theoretical reversible computing).

This attack on TKIP appears to have been a result of a mathematical breakthrough (i.e. the researchers found an inherent weakness in the encryption cipher). Without these mathematical "breakthroughs" brute forcing is not feasible, not even with multiple supercomputers.


snipper_cr
Premium
join:2002-01-22
Wheaton, IL
Quite right. I dont have the article to support this, but I read that if you take the worlds largest super computer, shrink it down to the size of a grain of sand, and then cover the earth it would still take millions of years to crack a full 128 bit AES... at least i think thats what it was. Either way, it is some miscomprehendable number.
Interesting thought about Von Neumann-Landauer limit and the second law of thermo... although does that take into account super conducting computers?

If this ultimately leads to a break in TKIP, that would be slightly unnerving. A break of AES would be down right disastrous. I hate to see what would happen if AES could be broken...
--
The early bird catches the worm, but the second mouse gets the cheese.


tschmidt
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join:2000-11-12
Milford, NH
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reply to KodiacZiller
said by KodiacZiller:

This attack on TKIP appears to have been a result of a mathematical breakthrough (i.e. the researchers found an inherent weakness in the encryption cipher).
From my reading of the article this is an attack on key management not the AES cipher. Key management is much harder to do then developing a robust cipher. AES is probably good until Quantum computing is practical.

/tom