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Linksys

@rr.com

Linksys Gateway Mode vs Router Mode

I've been asking myself this question for a while. I'm quite confused at what this mode is used for and where it's normally used. I know that Gateway mode allow the router to act as a Gateway to the Internet or another router hosting the Internet, if you're connecting from the second routers WAN port to the LAN port. What in the world does Router mode get used for and why is it there. I've tried doing some searches on Google and haven't found a good description anywhere. Don't need to use Router mode but I'm curious what it does. Thanks for any help in advance.


BryanC1968

join:2003-06-10
Elkins, WV
Gateway Mode should be used if your Linksys router is hosting your network's connection to the Internet.

Router Mode should be selected if the router exists on a network with other routers.


Linksys

@rr.com
Why is it that when I have my second router set to router and have Dynamic Routing turned on with it that I can't get any on the Internet? The WAN IP is set correctly and within the first routers DHCP range. Is this normal?


BryanC1968

join:2003-06-10
Elkins, WV
If I'm not mistaken.. I don't think the WAN port is used in router mode... Someone else might be able to verify this for you...

You can use 3rd party firmware however to change the WAN port into another LAN port.. I know that DD-WRT has that feature...


Linksys

@rr.com
So what exactly is the point of having Router mode turned on then? Can you still have network segmentation like you do in Gateway mode?


BryanC1968

join:2003-06-10
Elkins, WV
reply to Linksys
Basically.. Router Mode just turns your router into a switch/hub...


Linksys

@rr.com
Can't you use a Router as a switch and/or hub by just connecting a cable to one of the LAN ports instead without even turning Gateway mode off? In other words, a network can't be segmented and have WAN access without being in Gateway mode is what you're saying.


BryanC1968

join:2003-06-10
Elkins, WV

1 edit
Yeah you could use a router in gateway mode as a switch by not using the WAN port.. But you would have to make sure the router was on the same network segment as the 1st router or it will try to route traffic through the WAN port...

Yes I think that network segmentation would be best achieved by using both routers in Gateway Mode... But it may also be possible to do with one in Gateway Mode and the other in Router Mode... I'm not sure how to achieve this though... That is a little above my expertise...


Linksys

@rr.com
So what would happen if I had a router with the LAN IP of 192.168.0.1 connected to one of the LAN ports on the router with a LAN IP of 10.0.0.1 with DHCP turned on for both them and with it in Router mode?


BryanC1968

join:2003-06-10
Elkins, WV
That's a good question... I really don't know the answer.. My guess is that it would not work... It would be best easier to set them both to Gateway mode...

Example:
Router #1 (192.168.0.1) connected to the internet (WAN port)
Router #2 (10.0.0.1) connected from (WAN) to (LAN) of Router#1
Default Gateway of Router #2 assigned to IP of Router #1 (192.168.0.1) So that Traffic on the second router needing to get to the Internet would be routed to Router#1 and then sent on out to the WWW...


Linksys

@rr.com
Yeah, this is actually the method I'm using right now as I'm typing to you. I'm actually going to test the method I just wrote about and see how it works. (Turning on Router Mode on the second router, moving the cable from WAN to LAN on the second router instead and keeping DHCP turned on but having the LAN IP in the same subnet as the first router) I guess you would say making it a switch with it's own DHCP server.


BryanC1968

join:2003-06-10
Elkins, WV
reply to Linksys
I believe that Network Segmentation with two routers (1) in Gateway Mode and (2) in Router mode would have to be done by setting up Vlans (Virtual Lans), by assigning the individual LAN ports on Router#1(Gateway) to different VLans or Virtual Lan segments... So that If Router #2(router mode) was connected to Lan port #1 on the 1st Router(Gateway) it would be assigned the Vlan network segment (10.0.0.1)... And if say a 3rd router(router mode) was connected to Lan port#2 on the 1st Router(Gateway).. It would be assigned Vlan Network Segment (192.168.10.1).. etc, etc...


Linksys

@rr.com
Yeah, I tried it in Router mode and having both DHCP servers on and as long as the cable coming from Router 1 is connected one of the LAN ports on Router 2, the computer connected to the LAN ports on Router 2 will take IPs from Router 1s DHCP server, not Router 2's so there's no segmentation there. I guess Gateway is how it will stay since it does what I need it to do. It's quite confusing all this stuff.


Linksys

@rr.com
reply to BryanC1968
Okay, I was correct and you were correct. Having a wire connected from the LAN port to the WAN port of the second router in Router mode doesn't work correctly at all and causes a major mess. When in Gateway mode it works as expected. I've determined that there's three ways you can cascade the routers.

------------
WAN to LAN
------------

Router A:

LAN IP: 192.168.0.1
Subnet Mask: 255.255.255.0
Mode: Gateway

Router B:

LAN IP: 192.168.2.1
Subnet Mask: 255.255.255.0
WAN IP: 192.168.0.2
WAN Subnet Mask: 255.255.255.0
WAN Default Gateway: 192.168.0.1
Mode: Gateway

-----------
LAN to LAN
-----------

Router A:

LAN IP: 192.168.0.1
Subnet Mask: 255.255.255.0
Mode: Gateway

Router B:

LAN IP: 192.168.0.2
Subnet Mask: 255.255.255.0
Mode: Gateway or Router

-------------------------------------------------
LAN to WAN + LAN to WAN (Special Segmentation)
-------------------------------------------------

Gateway Router:

LAN IP: 192.168.0.1
Subnet Mask: 255.255.255.0
Mode: Gateway

Router A:

LAN IP: 192.168.2.1
Subnet Mask: 255.255.255.0
WAN IP: 192.168.0.2
WAN Subnet Mask: 255.255.255.0
WAN Default Gateway: 192.168.0.1
Mode: Gateway

Router B:

LAN IP: 192.168.3.1
Subnet Mas: 255.255.255.0
WAN IP: 192.168.0.3
WAN Subnet Mask: 255.255.255.0
WAN Default Gateway: 192.168.0.1
Mode: Gateway

Assuming that no computers are connected to the "Gateway" router (not Router A), computers on Router A can't see computers on Router B or vice versa because they are firewalled from each other. They can however access the Internet connection through the main Router since the WAN IP information is in the same IP segment (meaning it belongs to the LAN) that's hosting the Internet connection. This is different then the method of just WAN to LAN use two routers because in that case Router B could still access computer A's shared resources through it's IP address, since NetBIOS broadcasts don't pass through the Router so I've heard.