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amigo_boy

join:2005-07-22

1 edit

WARNING: 5-year $59.95 plan is misleading


Step 1: Softphone advertisement
  
Click for full size
Step 2: Purchase offer

step 3: Order page
FYI: It's been pointed out to me that the "Black Friday" "5-year plan" is another of MJ's questionable practices.

Here's the details:

1. The softphone advertisement says "Get your next 5 years for $59.95." (Emphasis added.). This price is contrasted to the regular price for 5 years: $99.95 ($19.99 x 5).

2. When you click on the ad, and sign-in you're presented with a web page where you can choose to order. This page says the same thing, including the word "Each" in the price (as if you're buying units of 5 years). It says you're saving $40.00 each.

3. When you click "order" you're presented with a web page where the wording has subtly changed to say that you're extending your time to 5 years.

In other words, you're getting from anywhere between 1 month to 4.9 years depending on how much time remains on your account (and whether you purchased 4 additional years at the time of initial purchase).

I've criticized MJ's marketing practices in the past. But, they always seemed to walk a fine line. This example seems different. There's no way to read the first two pages into the last one. The last page is contradictory, not just more specific.

*** - You're not buying 5 years, you're buying up to 5 years (and potentially much less if you bought the 4-year plan).

*** - You're not saving $40. You're saving "up to" $40.

*** - The word "each" is extremely misleading because it contributes to the perception that you're buying 5-year units, not a "top-off" of your account. The word "each" has no meaning because there would never be an incentive to buy more than one.

I think MJ is a great value. But, it's no wonder Dan and MJ are generating such a bad reputation. There are other things they've done where, even though they didn't cross the line, it still reflected badly on them. But, this example says something very definite and negative about their character. It's not just aggressive advertising (putting things in the most positive light). It's intentionally misleading and false.

Worse, it's targeted at existing, loyal customers.

Dan makes it very hard to recommend MJ. I'm always reluctant to refer it to people because you naturally want to provide a URL to MJ's page. But, it's so sleazy I'm ashamed to do that.

I gave a friend the link to Radio Shack "Black Friday" special. He googled for information, and found tons of complaints about MJ's business practices. I felt ashamed for recommending it to him.

After this stunt, I'm glad he found those complaints and didn't buy. I'd be even more ashamed if he became a victim of Dan's sleazy practices.

This event has really changed my opinion of Dan's character. It doesn't looks so well-intentioned any more. I can't explain away this event as just "effective advertising." It looks scummy and says a lot about the people running the company.

Mark

PX Eliezer70
Premium
join:2008-08-09
Hutt River
kudos:13

1 edit
Well, yes.

As a more general example, look at their main website. Today is November 30, so it says:

"Use the magicJack free for 30 days, make all the free calls you please. 100% Risk FREE - you pay nothing. (Hurry, Free Trial Offer not available in stores and only available here until Sunday, November 30, 2008. Only 20,000 magicJacks are still available for this Free Trial Offer!)"

Yesterday, the wording was the SAME except it had yesterday's day and date.

Back on November 17th it was the SAME except it said until Monday, November 17th.

And each day the number of MagicJacks is always 20,000. They just change the day and date.

Repeat: They just change the day and date. Every single day.

Nuff said?!

amigo_boy

join:2005-07-22
said by PX Eliezer70:

As a more general example, look at their main website.
That "hurry, last day is today" (every day) offer always bothered me. It's the kind of thing that raises red flags. But, there's nothing wrong with them saying "ah, what the heck, let's do it another day" (every day). Questionable? Sleazy? Reflects badly? Makes me not want to refer people to their web page? Yes.

But, this "5-year plan" is just plain dishonest. Especially when you consider that it's targeted at existing customers who've been encouraged to buy "4-year" plans (either at initial purchase, or through the my.magicjack.com account portal) and these were real units of purchase, not an ambiguous "top off" thing.

BTW: The "hurry, last day today" (every day) thing didn't look so bad to me because the ToS basically spells out that there is a 30-day trial. It says you have up to 30 days to return the product if you don't agree with the ToS. So, MJ is just presenting the ToS term in a positive, light.

But, you're right, it's dishonest to say "ends today" when they know the ToS will contain the same 30-day grace period tomorrow.

Mark

PX Eliezer70
Premium
join:2008-08-09
Hutt River
kudos:13
said by amigo_boy:

..... Questionable? Sleazy? Reflects badly? Makes me not want to refer people to their web page? Yes.

But, this "5-year plan" is just plain dishonest......

.....But, you're right, it's dishonest to say "ends today" when they know the ToS will contain the same 30-day grace period tomorrow.
Thanks for thoughtful reply.

Point is, does MJ management:

a) Think that people are so dumb, they just won't notice these things?

b) Have general contempt for their customers?

c) Have no respect even for themselves?

d) Don't care about building a respected long-term reputation for their brand, because they don't expect to be around anyway? So they pursue the quick buck with lowest common denominator advertising gimmicks?

In the end, they must decide if the story will end up magic or tragic.


prestonlewis
Premium,MVM
join:2003-04-13
Sacramento, CA
reply to amigo_boy
If you are gullible enough to buy 5 years of VOIP service ahead of time from ANY VOIP provider, losing $59 is the least of your problems.

amigo_boy

join:2005-07-22
said by prestonlewis:

If you are gullible enough to buy 5 years of VOIP service ahead of time from ANY VOIP provider, losing $59 is the least of your problems.
Conversely, if MJ can't honestly encourage people to invest in their company for the long term, that would seem to be the least of the company's problems (and poor reflection on the owner's character).

Mark

amigo_boy

join:2005-07-22
reply to PX Eliezer70
said by PX Eliezer70:

d) Don't care about building a respected long-term reputation for their brand, because they don't expect to be around anyway? So they pursue the quick buck with lowest common denominator advertising gimmicks?
I don't know if they consciously don't expect to be around. But, I agree that Dan seems to be focused on immediate results without concern for long-term consequences.

A few months ago DSLR ran a story on MJ. Dan stopped by to comment on a couple of posts. He made some comments about how he makes changes to the MJ website to see if sales increase or decrease (to justify the sleazy tone of that website). I imagine the "5-year plan" was put together using the same reasoning. ("If I word it this way, I get 25,000 responses. If I word it this way, I get 30,000.")

Totally oblivious to the mounting number of negative comments floating around the web. The number of BBB complaints.

MJ's a great value. But, I think Dan's short-sighted business practices will do more harm than low prices.

Mark

PX Eliezer70
Premium
join:2008-08-09
Hutt River
kudos:13
Yup.

Not to drag this out, but it occurs to me that regarding the complaint from the original poster, there will be lots of unhappy customers down the road. That is, when they realize that they purchased an extension to a total length of 5 years (including what they already had), not 5 years more on top of their current term, as the OP pointed out.

LOTS of unhappy customers down the road.

Why would anyone pre-book such wrath?

One possibility is if they don't think they'll be around to be on the receiving end of it.

--------------------------------------------------

What I'm sad and concerned about is that problems like SunRocket's failure, Vonics disappearance, the money problems of Vonage, and advertising methods of MJ, can reflect badly on the whole VoIP field.

This field needs to survive, or else our only landline-type phone service choices will be POTS or cable/ISP.


dvd536
as Mr. Pink as they come
Premium
join:2001-04-27
Phoenix, AZ
kudos:4
reply to prestonlewis
said by prestonlewis:

If you are gullible enough to buy 5 years of VOIP service ahead of time from ANY VOIP provider, losing $59 is the least of your problems.
EXACTLY!!!
didn't sunrocket teach anyone anything?
*sigh*
--
When I gez aju zavateh na nalechoo more new yonooz tonigh molinigh - Ken Lee

amigo_boy

join:2005-07-22
said by dvd536:

EXACTLY!!!
didn't sunrocket teach anyone anything? *sigh*
I kind of disagree. I don't see anything wrong with making a calculated decision to _invest_ in a company, understanding that it may be money lost.

Five years for $60 would be enough potential reward for me to risk the money. But, four years? It doesn't look as attractive. And, then when you realize the extent to which the founder has no regard for his own reputation, it looks even less attractive.

It's hard to believe it's a credible business venture, with much chance for long-term success, using often questionable (and sometimes deplorable) business practices.

To me, that's what makes it a bad investment. Not just that VOIP generally has been a volatile industry. But, that MJ specifically has demonstrated self-destructive practices.

Mark


RockyBB
Premium
join:2005-01-31
Steamboat Springs, CO
reply to amigo_boy
said by amigo_boy:

There's no way to read the first two pages into the last one.
I read your posting three times, and I don't see where their offer is anything other than a top-off, i.e. a 5 year extension to the current term. Long term readers will remember that I warn of MJ's despicable marketing practices, but I don't agree that this is despicable. I think one would be a sucker to take it, but I don't read that it converts to 5 years total, essentially giving up the remaining time on the original one year term. I understand your point and what you're saying, I just can't get there myself. From a marketing perspective, I'll agree that they really should make it more explicit that the 5 year deal is a top-off and not a restart.

Skeptical readers could interpret the 5 year deal as simply an attempt at an interest free unsecured loan of $60. MJ is telling us that $60 today is more important to them than providing service tomorrow -- or possibly really necessary for them to be around to provide service tomorrow -- or possibly that their investors have tired of continuing to float the boat -- or possibly their current cash position puts them in danger of defaulting on some loan terms.

I have detailed in other threads that there are plenty of other more substantive reasons other than the 5 year deal to avoid MJ, and I will warn the casual reader (lurker) that simply not taking the 5 year extension will not protect you.


Fir_Na_Tine
Giggity Giggity
Premium
join:2001-01-03
Sout Joisy
reply to amigo_boy
amigo_boy, thanks for the post. I think on merit alone I won't buy the 5 year plan. And when my time is up in February with MJ.I will give a more thorough look into alternatives in VOIP. I might stay with MJ and just do it yearly.
--
"Shut up brain or I'll stab ya with a Q-Tip"- Homer Simpson

amigo_boy

join:2005-07-22
reply to RockyBB
said by RockyBB:

but I don't read that it converts to 5 years total, essentially giving up the remaining time on the original one year term.
I don't understand your point above. What you said you don't read (in the advertisement) is exactly what the offer is. That's my complaint. It doesn't add five years to your remaining time. It replaces your remaining time.

And, your remaining time may not be just one year. If someone bought 4 additional years (at the initial time of purchase, or through their my.magicjack.com account portal), they're giving up potentially 5 years. (I.e., there's no real value despite the advertisement saying you save $40.00 on the price of five individual units of 1-year plans).

The other deceptive part of this is that the price is described as units of "each" when, if it's a replacement of existing time, there'd never be a reason to buy more than one. The word "each" has no meaning.

What makes this look intentionally misleading is that it's targeted at existing MJ users. These users are familiar with at least the "4 extra years" offer when purchasing their MJ. Or, the offer to "extend your license by 4 years" in their my.magicjack.com account portal. An existing MJ user would automatically interpret "your next 5 years" as additional to the time they already bought and own.

Mark

amigo_boy

join:2005-07-22

4 edits
reply to RockyBB
Click for full size
2. Purchase offer page
Here's the other thing which makes this look like intentional deception.

1. On the offer page you're offered an MJ with 1-year of service for $29.99. They say this is a $10 savings over the normal price.

2. Or, you can "save even more" by purchasing the MJ + the "Five Year Plan" for $89.94.

This price is equal to the price of the discounted MJ (which includes one year), and the discounted price of the so-called "Five Year Plan."

3. The combined offer says this is a savings of $50, combining the purported savings of the MJ ($10) and of the "Five Year Plan" ($40).

But, you just gave up the 1 year of service that came with the MJ. The savings should have been reduced by $19.99 because the purported $40 savings of the "Five Year Plan" is derived from comparing its price to the price of purchasing five individual 1-year units of time at $19.99.

In the past, I've tried to find ways to rationalize MJ's sleazy behavior as just over-aggressive spin. But, this "next five years" thing is overtly dishonest.

There's no way you can describe a unit with one year of service as a $10 savings. And, describe a "five year plan" that replaces all your purchased time as a $40 savings (compared to purchasing five individual years). And then combine the two offers, losing the one year that came with the MJ unit while combining the two purported savings.

That's dishonest. And it supports the natural reading of the softphone advertisement that five years are being sold.

I didn't have a lot of respect for Dan's business practices. But, this advertisement causes me to have a great deal of contempt for him. It indicates he has no concern for his own reputation. Not a good sign for the potential viability of his business.

Mark


RockyBB
Premium
join:2005-01-31
Steamboat Springs, CO
reply to amigo_boy
said by amigo_boy:

I don't understand your point above.
OK, I read it a 4th time, intentionally poisoning my bias with your interpretation and I can get there. My expectation is this was slapped together, poorly worded, in an attempt to get the free loans. I don't think they give a whit about the 4th or 5th or 6th or 7th extra year ... they're probably more focused on the cash flow to make it to next year.

I suppose if MJ is monitoring this forum they could add some clarifying wording, like "extend your service an additional 5 years."

If anyone reading this is a MJ customer that took the offer, maybe they could check their user portal to determine their new anniversary date, and let us know if the 5 years was an extension or a clock restart.

Regardless who is right on this topic, there's plenty pre-existing analysis that would scare off many risk averse prospective customers.

amigo_boy

join:2005-07-22
said by RockyBB:

If anyone reading this is a MJ customer that took the offer, maybe they could check their user portal to determine their new anniversary date, and let us know if the 5 years was an extension or a clock restart.
Sorry, I sometimes assume people who read things here also read the magicjacksupport forum. See this post:

»www.magicjacksupport.com/decepti ··· 760.html

I didn't understand it until "couch potato" (who is fir_na_tine here?) explained it to me in terms I could understand.

Basically the last (3rd) web page makes it clear that it's not an extension of 5 years, but "to" 5 years. That's where they can claim "it doesn't matter what we said on the 'come on' pages, that last page says what you're really getting."

Most people wouldn't even catch the subtle word change after being encouraged to think about it in terms of purchasing units of 5 years.

I guess after you've been around Pick-Pocket Dan long enough, you start reading things 5-6 times to find the hidden meaning.

Mark


RockyBB
Premium
join:2005-01-31
Steamboat Springs, CO
said by amigo_boy:

I sometimes assume people who read things here also read the magicjacksupport forum. See this post:

»www.magicjacksupport.com/decepti ··· 760.html
Well, I'm stunned. That's a form of discriminatory pricing -- the same $60 makes different customers forfeit different amounts of prepaid service. "Give up what you've already paid for and give me $60 more." What a thief! Only in America!

amigo_boy

join:2005-07-22
said by RockyBB:

the same $60 makes different customers forfeit different amounts of prepaid service.
What that guy literally says is that it doesn't just replace your existing plan (and start today). But, it replaces your existing plan and starts at the time of the existing plan. So, you're not even getting "your next 5 years" (the wording of the softphone advertisement).

I could sort of understand that the softphone ad could be understood as "get your next 5 years (starting today, replacing whatever you had, mumble, mumble)". But, what that guy experienced is even worse than that.

Mark


lcompton

join:2008-05-04
Exton, PA
reply to amigo_boy
Good evening.

Since I decided to go for this deal believing that I would extend my one-year term by an additional five years for a total of six years, I can confirm what actually occurred in my case.

First, when I made the purchase on Saturday, 29 November, I was responding to a Black Friday special link provided by magicJack in the softphone client.

Here's the link for the insatiably curious (like me):

»secure.magicjack.com/my/blackfri ··· day.html

After completing the purchase, I received an e-mail, which completely confused me because it read as if I had purchased another magicJack rather than a plan extension.

I logged into my magicJack account a few times and noticed that the license term had not been extended, so I had a go at the support chat and learned that an activation code would be sent to me via e-mail.

The license extension activation code was received this evening. I proceeded to »my.magicjack.com and entered the activation code. My magicJack license term was extended exactly four years to the day from the date of the original one year anniversary date. In other words, my magicJack used to expire on 23 April 2009. Now, I have a license to use it through 23 April 2013.

The upshot of this exercise is that I've extended my license by four years at approximately USD15.00/annum. It's obviously a better value than the per annum price of USD19.95 if renewing one year at a time. And, it does lock in the cost for the next four years beyond the original one year term in the event the cost of the annual license increases, which no one can say for sure will happen.

I have written extensively regarding my experience with magicJack and I continue to be impressed with the product. However, the upsell to five years was misleading in my opinion. The advertisement clearly gives the impression that the consumer is purchasing a five-year extension, not a four-year extension as is, in fact, the case. On the other hand, four or five years, magicJack has proven to be an excellent value for me.

I'm in the process of writing another lengthy update to my thread on magicJack from last spring/summer. I have since purchased a second magicJack (when they became available on QVC.com) and I did successfully purchase a fully-functioning Dell Latitude C800 laptop off of Craig's List for USD100.00, which is now serving, quite excellently I might add, as a second dedicated telephony server. The interesting thing about the Dell laptop is that the model is from 2000 (upgraded to Windows XP Professional from Windows 2000) complete with USB1.1 ports and magicJack installed flawlessly and was in a ready to call state within three minutes of plugging it into a USB port. I'll have a much more detailed review on this experience if I can ever finish writing the thing.

As always, thank you for reading.

Lisa

amigo_boy

join:2005-07-22

1 edit
said by lcompton:

The upshot of this exercise is that I've extended my license by four years at approximately USD15.00/annum. It's obviously a better value than the per annum price of USD19.95 if renewing one year at a time.
I agree that it's not a bad deal. But, it's bizarre to me that Pick-Pocket Dan apparently thinks this kind of "5=4" nonsense won't eventually catch up to him.

I don't see how MJ can remain a viable business when Dan apparently has such little regard for his and his company's reputation.

It's crazy. If 4 years is a good deal, what's the point of misleading people about 5 years? Like they won't figure it out as soon as they activate their purchase? And then they're forced to concede 4 years is a good deal (as they swallow their pride about having had their pocket picked).

MJ's a good deal. But, I have little faith in Dan's ability to take it much further with this kind of business practice. It's like he's his own worst enemy. He has to keep his prices low to counter his own reputation. (People will overlook the pocket-picking if the price is low enough.). That doesn't sound like a healthy business plan.

Mark


SMCinAZ
Premium
join:2000-11-29
Glendale, AZ

1 edit
Sounds like the best thing you could do if you really wanted your maximum value is to get the code, then wait until your renewal date THEN put in the code, rather than doing it right away.

amigo_boy

join:2005-07-22
said by SMCinAZ:

Sounds like the best thing you could do if you really wanted your maximum value is to get the code, then wait until your renewal date THEN put in the code, rather than doing it right away.
You're right! That's a clever idea.

However, after this episode of clearly dishonest behavior, I don't have a lot of confidence in MJ's ability to stay in business that long. Buying 4 years (called "5 years" in Dan's vocabulary) doesn't look like a good investment.

MJ's reputation was already damaged due to many other questionable activities. I always ascribed it to overzealous marketing (helping customers have high expectations). Or, business processes that hadn't been worked out (leading to overcharging, non-delivery of redemption codes, inability to transfer an account to a new MJ).

But, this "5 year" thing speaks very loudly to the *character* of those running the company. I don't see how they can remain in business when they have so little concern for their reputation (which is now confirmed to be deserved).

Mark


lcompton

join:2008-05-04
Exton, PA
reply to SMCinAZ
said by SMCinAZ:

Sounds like the best thing you could do if you really wanted your maximum value is to get the code, then wait until your renewal date THEN put in the code, rather than doing it right away.
Good evening, SMCinAZ.

Not at all. Waiting until the expiration date to enter the code would not change the result, which is adding four years to the existing license term.

This doesn't matter that much to me. Of course, it would be much nicer to get five years for USD60.00 than four years for USD60.00. But, as others have noted, it's magicJack. Their marketing leaves something to be desired and, at best, they leave the question of how the five years is calculated nebulous. I'm sure it's intentional, but we live in a buyer beware society.

magicJack continues to be an excellent value for me. It has been so effective a solution that I was impressed enough to add a second home telephone line on magicJack. Now, I have two telephone lines for zero dollars per month. That deal with Verizon years ago was about USD50.00/month and I didn't have unlimited toll/long-distance calling or advanced calling features.

I'm happy.

Thank you.

Lisa

amigo_boy

join:2005-07-22
said by lcompton:

Not at all. Waiting until the expiration date to enter the code would not change the result, which is adding four years to the existing license term.
He may have been thinking of the other person's report that his license was reset back to the original date of service (plus 4 years). He didn't get 4 years added on to whatever time he had. He had 4 years replace his current time.

In that case his suggestion makes sense.

Mark

amigo_boy

join:2005-07-22
BTW: Now there's a report on magicjacksupport.com that someone tried to buy a few of those "Black Friday" $29.95 units. His order was declined hours later saying the offer is only good for people who'd never purchased an MJ before.

It sounds like they had overwhelming demand, and cut back the offer. But, it's just so typical Dirty-Deal Dan: He displays the ad to existing users when they know they'll decline orders from existing users.

It's like he's his own worst enemy. Creating ill-will and a bad reputation when he's entirely in control of those events, and has nothing to gain by making the choices he does.

Mark

viafax999

join:2000-06-03
Westford, MA
reply to amigo_boy
Mark

The ad is not misleading it's actually blatant lying. The deal is for FOUR years - 4 x $19.99 - $79.96.
When you get the activation code and go to enter it you see this
Your license is active through APRIL 19, 2013
Extend by 5 years - $59.95
Extend by 1 year - $19.95
Extend your License
- Or - If you received a redemption code for additional years,
please enter the code here.
Code:

This is also a blatant lie - the 1 year license extension is correct however the 5 year license is not - notice it says
Extend BY 5 years however it actually means Extend TO 5 years from date of current license origination
I talked to support and they tell me that means an extension to 5 years on your original free 1 year when you received the device, so an extra 4 year license. They didn't appear to have an answer to the question of what if I were purchasing a 5 year extension to the 1 year license that I purchased for $19.99.
Bottom line is that nowhere until you have applied the code does it appear mention other than adding 5 years which is basically fraudulent advertising.

Stupidity on their part as it really just increases the bad press on the net and most people would probably consider 4 years of unlimited calling for $60 quite a good deal anyway.

Peter

amigo_boy

join:2005-07-22
said by viafax999:

Stupidity on their part as it really just increases the bad press on the net and most people would probably consider 4 years of unlimited calling for $60 quite a good deal anyway.
I agree. That's what's baffling. If Dan was honest about what he's selling, it's still a great deal. He wouldn't generate all the bad will. Customers would be more inclined to defend the service when mistakes are made. But, between this and all the other questionable actions, it's not worth the effort to defend the service.

Sure, it's a great deal. But, it's hard to go out of my way to make that point to someone when I have go through a bunch of disclaimers and qualifications concerning life with Drama Dan.

Mark

amigo_boy

join:2005-07-22

1 edit
reply to amigo_boy
said by amigo_boy:

said by lcompton:

Not at all. Waiting until the expiration date to enter the code would not change the result, which is adding four years to the existing license term.
He may have been thinking of the other person's report that his license was reset back to the original date of service (plus 4 years). He didn't get 4 years added on to whatever time he had. He had 4 years replace his current time.
Correction. I'm confusing myself because this is a matter of people seeing the same thing from different perspectives. The other guy's perspective was that it reset his license back to the original date, and gave him five years (losing his remaining time). Your perspective is that it extended your license by four years.

That's the same thing. [duh] So, your point is correct that it doesn't matter when you apply the so-called "5-year" redemption code because you'll get the same thing either way. There's no time value by holding onto it longer.

However, I think SMCinAZ was on the right track. The time value is in your money. You can hang onto your cash, buy the "5-year plan" on the last day of your original 1-year plan, and get the same thing you would have gotten if you parted with your money before your 1-year expiration.

I imagine Pick-Pocket Dan believes none of his customers have enough twists in their brain to figure this out. In my case, he's almost right.

Mark


lcompton

join:2008-05-04
Exton, PA
said by amigo_boy:

said by amigo_boy:

said by lcompton:

Not at all. Waiting until the expiration date to enter the code would not change the result, which is adding four years to the existing license term.
He may have been thinking of the other person's report that his license was reset back to the original date of service (plus 4 years). He didn't get 4 years added on to whatever time he had. He had 4 years replace his current time.
Correction. I'm confusing myself because this is a matter of people seeing the same thing from different perspectives. The other guy's perspective was that it reset his license back to the original date, and gave him five years (losing his remaining time). Your perspective is that it extended your license by four years.

That's the same thing. [duh] So, your point is correct that it doesn't matter when you apply the so-called "5-year" redemption code because you'll get the same thing either way. There's no time value by holding onto it longer.

However, I think SMCinAZ was on the right track. The time value is in your money. You can hang onto your cash, buy the "5-year plan" on the last day of your original 1-year plan, and get the same thing you would have gotten if you parted with your money before your 1-year expiration.

I imagine Pick-Pocket Dan believes none of his customers have enough twists in their brain to figure this out. In my case, he's almost right.

Mark
Good afternoon, Mark.

When I purchased the so-called five-year extension, four years were added to my original term, which originally expires something-or-other April 2009. It's now something-or-other April 2013. That's not my perspective, that is a fact of what occurred.

I don't know what happened to the so-called other guy. However, I can say with certainty that renewing the day before the license expires would still only extend the license by four years.

Also, based on my experience with magicJack, I wouldn't wait until the day of the license expiration to attempt a renewal of any kind because the account might be locked out. This would be a risky bet at best. If anyone is contemplating this experiment, I suggest waiting no longer than the day before the license expiration date.

This just isn't that complicated. The USD59.95 offer extends four years to the extending term regardless of when it expires.

Thank you.

Lisa

amigo_boy

join:2005-07-22

4 edits
said by lcompton:

I don't know what happened to the so-called other guy. However, I can say with certainty that renewing the day before the license expires would still only extend the license by four years.
The first complaint depicted it as replacing his 1-year plan with a 5-year plan. His complaint was that he lost the remaining time on his 1-year plan.

Your experience sounded contradictory to me, at first. But, after thinking about it I realize you're both saying the same thing. You're saying it added 4 years to the end of your 1-year plan. That's the same thing the first report experienced. It's just that he saw it as 5 years starting from the first day of his original 1-year plan. (Which is the same thing you experienced. You just didn't see it that way.).

Either way it's crooked. You either get your "next 5 years" in the form of 4 years (your perspective). Or, you start from the very beginning of your original plan (which is hardly "next" anything).

Also, when I said a person could wait until the last day of their 1-year plan, I was just illustrating a point that, although there's no tangible benefit waiting to apply the "5-year" (really 4-year) redemption code because (as you pointed out) the result is the same. But, there is a tangible benefit to wait to give MJ your money for another 4 years. If you don't get any benefit from immediately redeeming that purchase, then you might as well keep your money in your own pocket (earning interest, deferring the expenditure to closer to the time of received benefit, able to make a more informed decision based upon more-recent information about MJ's potential to last 4 more years, etc.).

But, I think the best advice (considering recent revelations of Dan's new depths of deception) is to buy only one year at a time. Of course it's a personal decision involving risk/benefit considerations. The risk looks greater lately.

Mark