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Rungel
Run A Mile Live Awhile
Premium
join:2001-12-05
CT

Replacing the guts to my toilet

If i replace the guts to my standard toilet will that help the flushing? Make it faster with a little more power?

xj31

join:2005-09-25
Lake Villa, IL
I'm not a plumber but I don't see how it could.

HarryH3
Premium
join:2005-02-21
kudos:3
Reviews:
·Suddenlink
reply to Rungel
Nope. On all but the power-flush type (which send pressurized water into the bowl) you only have gravity to do the job. The flapper gets lifted out of the way and the water drains into the rim of the bowl. Some toilets just don't do as good a job of flushing as others, due to their design.

I think that Consumer Reports has tested a bunch of toilets and rated them according to how well they actually flushed. Some were MUCH worse than others...


tschmidt
Premium,MVM
join:2000-11-12
Milford, NH
kudos:9
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reply to Rungel
HarryH3 See Profile is correct changing guts will not change flush power assuming toilet is working correctly.

1) Check water level. There should be a mark on the overflow tube about an inch or so below the top. The higher the water the more powerful the flush.

2) Check refill tube squirts water then toilet is flushed and water is going into overflow tube.

3) Is it possible anything caught in the trap?

4) Lastly if sewer vent is plugged it will interfere with toilet flush.

I replaced both our conventional toilets years ago with low flow (1.6 Gal) units. Been very happy. As an aside if condensation is a problem go with insulated tank.

/tom


StNickless

@tmodns.net
reply to Rungel
I have changed MANY flush valves that are clogged due to excessive scale in the water &/or pipes upstream passing rust.

It always helps some, no matter the situation.
How much will depend.

Lift water closet lid, look inside.
Is there *stuff* in the bottom like flakes or chunks ?

tcope
Premium
join:2003-05-07
Sandy, UT
kudos:2
reply to Rungel
This is funny... I just got done "trying" to correct a similar problem with one of my toilets.

Toilets flush when the weight of the water in the bowl in enough to push it up and over the "s" curve in the drain. As there is sufficient water in the bowl, this creates a siphon and pulls all/most of the water from the bowl into the drain. This is what causes the toilet to "flush". As the water lowers, the siphon is broken (air enters the "s" curve) and the flush stops. While the reservoir is filled back up some of the water is cycled back into the bowl as well.

I see two reasons why you could be having a problem. The drain line is partially clogged or the toilet bowl is not getting enough water quickly enough to allow for a good flush.

Is their a bathtub or sink in the same bathroom? If so, do these drain slowly? If so, I'd say that you need to have the drain line snaked.

If they drain fine then I'd say that the toilet bowl was not filling with enough water and/or it's not filling quickly enough. You could replace the toilet. In my case the holes around the rim of the toilet were slightly clogged. I used a wire coat hanger to ream them out and the toilet worked just fine after that. Water also enters the toilet at the base of the bowl but I don't see that this could be the problem and I don't know of anything that could be done if it was.

Take the cover off the reservoir and watch the cycle of the flush. Make sure the flapper is not closing with more then a little water in the reservoir. Make sure the small hose from the shut off float is sending water into the PVC overflow drain. Make sure the shut off float is operating correctly.

Tyreman

join:2002-10-08
Canada

2 edits
reply to Rungel
If all else is good,no toilet obstruction like spoons forks etc.
I took one of each out of a toilet a few years ago much to the owners horror.

One way if the toilet has been in for a few years and on hard water is to take a cut length of coat hanger and force it around the bowl rim flush holes.
As you know they are around the inside of rim of the bowl.
force the wire in the holes,let it bend as it goes in and you usually get a huge amount of hardened deposits free they will come out as you "work" the coat hanger wire flush to clear.
make sure ALL the little holes are thoroughly open and clean.
Some toilets I have seen you literally have to spin and force the wire into the holes, its almost as if they have become part of the porcelain.
Some toilets have more than a dozen or so of the holes on the underside of the rim.

Waterbug

join:2008-03-30
reply to Rungel
A simple Styrofoam float block on the flapper valve chain can cause it to remain open longer and result in a more effective flush. Such a device could in violation of water usage restrictions. (or maybe not )

Bobcat79
Premium
join:2001-02-04
reply to Tyreman
said by Tyreman:

One way if the toilet has been in for a few years and on hard water is to take a cut length of coat hanger and force it around the bowl rim flush holes.
As you know they are around the inside of rim of the bowl.
force the wire in the holes,let it bend as it goes in and you usually get a huge amount of hardened deposits free they will come out as you "work" the coat hanger wire flush to clear.
make sure ALL the little holes are thoroughly open and clean.
Some toilets I have seen you literally have to spin and force the wire into the holes, its almost as if they have become part of the porcelain.
Some toilets have more than a dozen or so of the holes on the underside of the rim.
That's what I was going to suggest. I had a "slow" toilet and cleaning out the holes under the rim fixed it.
--
It's nice to be important, but it's more important to be nice.


Rungel
Run A Mile Live Awhile
Premium
join:2001-12-05
CT
Reviews:
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reply to Rungel
Thanks for the suggestions. I guess i got a little spoiled after installing a new one in the masterbath. I did clean out the holes under the lid and after flushing a dozen times seems to be pretty good now. This is a 20 year old toilet with a lot of rust in the tank. I should probably clean that out also?

For Masterbath:
I bought a 70$ 16 inch height with the seat from Home Depot.. 1.6 gal. I think it works very well. Many people were telling me to spend 300 or so. Glad i didn't.
--

'rocking the awakening mind'!



Bobcat79
Premium
join:2001-02-04
said by Rungel:

I bought a 70$ 16 inch height with the seat from Home Depot.. 1.6 gal. I think it works very well. Many people were telling me to spend 300 or so. Glad i didn't.
Where I used to live, we had Briggs toilets, which I gather are low-end toilets. Now I live in a place with American Standard toilets. The Briggs ones worked better. Go figure. Both were from the mid-80's, so they're not low-flow.
--
It's nice to be important, but it's more important to be nice.