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elray

join:2000-12-16
Santa Monica, CA
Reviews:
·Time Warner Cable
·EarthLink

Who cares?

Why do we need to be "#1"? (at taxpayer expense, of course)

Please, someone, show us what the "killer app" is that needs so much speed, that will yield us greater employment or industry growth.

Show us why anyone on the farm "needs" more than 56K digital service.

If your only argument is you don't like paying $80 a month for 512KB service, well, sorry - I don't cherish paying municipal sewer and trash rates; are you going to subsidize my bill?


probboy

join:2008-01-10
Natick, MA

I totally agree with you. Sometimes I wonder if the folks on this site have actual jobs and pay taxes. It's great to want something, but don't expect the rest of us to pay for it.

It seems like every other month some sort of report comes out saying how far behind the US is in broadband penetration. At least this report admits that it was produced by a company with a vested interest in expanding access to broadband.


Sammer

join:2005-12-22
Canonsburg, PA

2 recommendations

reply to elray

You should and there is one thing that could be done that wouldn't cost taxpayers a dime. Remove the regulatory hurdles faced by the would be competitors of the entrenched giants and this country would be number one in broadband penetration in just a few years.



realitychecklulz

@suddenlink.net
reply to probboy

We already have paid for it. »www.pbs.org/cringely/pulpit/2007···683.html


jjeffeory

join:2002-12-04
USA
reply to elray

Yea, why do we need electricity either? Show us why anyone on the farm "needs" electricity or running water?


Lazlow

join:2006-08-07
Saint Louis, MO
reply to elray

elray

I take it you have not spent much time on a farm recently. Today's farmer has to stay on top of the current trends in farming just to stay in business. Considering that crops like wheat (where your bread comes from) can change from $2.32 a bushel to $7.25 a bushel, you better have a pretty good idea what the crop is going to be worth BEFORE you plant it. When new hybrid seeds come out that can increase yields by 20%, you need to be the first to find out and not the last(there is usually only so much of anything new). When a new herbicide comes out that harms your crop less (almost all herbicides cause some harm to the plant, just not as much as it does to the weeds) than what you used last year, you need to know. When your tractors use thousands of gallon of diesel you need to know if you contract (lock in the price) now or if the fuel will be cheaper later (just think about how much fuel jumped last summer). In short a farmer NEEDS decent internet speeds just to compete in today's market.


elray

join:2000-12-16
Santa Monica, CA
Reviews:
·Time Warner Cable
·EarthLink

said by Lazlow:

elray

I take it you have not spent much time on a farm recently. Today's farmer has to stay on top of the current trends in farming just to stay in business. Considering that crops like wheat (where your bread comes from) can change from $2.32 a bushel to $7.25 a bushel, you better have a pretty good idea what the crop is going to be worth BEFORE you plant it. When your tractors use thousands of gallon of diesel you need to know if you contract (lock in the price) now or if the fuel will be cheaper later (just think about how much fuel jumped last summer).
Sorry, no sale. None of the above requires data speeds in excess of 1200 baud. You can wrap all the glitter you want around it, but you don't need broadband to do trading, contracts, futures pricing, etc.

And even if you did have a voracious application that required more than 56K, your farm operation can pay the $80 a month for the bandwidth - or you obviously shouldn't be in the farm business.

elray

join:2000-12-16
Santa Monica, CA
Reviews:
·Time Warner Cable
·EarthLink
reply to jjeffeory

said by jjeffeory:

Yea, why do we need electricity either? Show us why anyone on the farm "needs" electricity or running water?
And your point is...?

There are plenty of places where there is no electricity, or you have to place your own utility poles to connect to it. The taxpayer does not subsidize your installation.

Likewise, there are an equal number of sites where you don't have water piped in, but must drill your own well, at your expense.

If your rural data speeds are less than you desire, then its up to you to pay the freight to upgrade them. Don't place that burden on the rest of us.

Lazlow

join:2006-08-07
Saint Louis, MO

1 edit
reply to elray

elray

You can't get broadband on a lot of farms for $80 a month and on many you cannot get real broadband at all.

You are still thinking in a 1970's mode where you had weeks to gather your information and were still up to date with current information. The world does not work that way any more. If you are two days behind (typical delivery for W. Journal in true rural areas) you are SOL. If you try to buy or sell based on the prices delivered in that time frame, you miss the boat.

The time between a reservation for a new seed being offered and all available reservations being committed is often only a matter of hours. When you realize that will often make a 20% difference in yields, you see what a difference this can make. These types of decisions cannot be made until you have a good idea where the market and the weather are headed (very little lead time).

You also have to realize how deep technology is in farming now. Meters that record yields in real time via gps (for targeted fertilization and herbicide application). Gps controlled planting (automatically increasing/decrease seed rate in areas that have better/worse soil). Automated sensors that determine when the irrigation needs to be turned on (optimization of resource application and minimizing expense). This is just a list off the top of my head of the electronics that need updates and data analysis uploads(not easy to do without a broadband connection). The days of just going out and "just farming" are long gone.


Lazlow

join:2006-08-07
Saint Louis, MO

2 edits
reply to elray

elray(referring to your reply to jjeffeory)

You really have no clue how electricity and phone service got out into rural areas. They were subsidized by the government. Just like the railroads were(they got a section of land for every mile of track they put down).

»newdeal.feri.org/tva/tva10.htm

In many rural areas the water that comes from the well is not fit for human consumption. Again the government subsidized the installation of rural water pipelines. I grew up in one such area. The pipeline ran to farms that were thirty miles from the nearest town.

»en.wikipedia.org/wiki/National_R···ociation


oscarwilde1

join:2008-10-08

1 edit
reply to elray

said by elray:

Show us why anyone on the farm "needs" more than 56K digital service.

We don't plow with mules on the farm any more...Farming has gotten a lot more complicated in the past 200 years...for example, our neighbor has a fully computerized, complex automated feed system in place in which monitors useage and automatically reoders from the vendor. The turf farm monitors turf health and water usage with satellite data.Just to give one example about how high speed date transmission could impact your life...more effective water use by farmers who irrigate will have a direct impact on the cost of your water and sewer, because wasted water depletes the aquifer and causes municipal areas to have to seek alternative water resources. If you want a few thousand more examples I can go on and on...Its not Green Acres out here, we NEED technology! What about dealing with animal disease issues? Small town vets need to be able to transmit data (including xrays and ultrasounds) about perplexing cases quickly to major vet centers. That could mean the difference between you dying of Elbola or Anthrax or Bird Flu