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IPPlanMan
Holy Cable Modem Batman

join:2000-09-20
Washington, DC
kudos:1

3 edits

How can Comcast offer no-cap business tier for 20-30 more?

Here's what I'm not getting... and maybe Dadkins or someone else can explain this to me...

Comcast offers uncapped Business Class Service for 20-30 dollars more a month than the 250GB capped "residential class" service.

Internet Starter Plan $59.95 per month
6 Mbps downloads/1Mbps Uploads + PowerBoost
McAfee® Virus Scan
Microsoft Communication Tools, including 2 Outlook mailboxes
Domain name and three-page Web site
24/7 Business Class support
Additional details
Recommended for:
Businesses with lighter download needs
Businesses looking for a more economical service that doesn’t skimp on speed or features
Request a Consultation Order Now

Internet Preferred Plan $89.95 per month
16 Mbps downloads/2Mbps Uploads + PowerBoost
McAfee® Virus Scan
Microsoft Communication Tools, including 4 Outlook mailboxes
Domain name and starter three-page Web site
24/7 Business Class support
Fully customizable options
Additional details
Recommended for:
Businesses with normal download and upload needs
Businesses looking for increased productivity at a highly competitive rate

--
So I ask....

How can Comcast offer these services without a cap? Are they assuming that only a few people can get them?

Are they assuming that the majority of residential users won't want to pay for this uncapped service?

Perhaps they're making the assumption that given the higher price (which included add-ons like MS email), that the "load" on the infrastructure won't be as high.

It's not clear to me how 20-30 dollars a month can change a capped service into an uncapped one.... Besides, that uncapped service is likely to have substantially higher loads because of the multiple person "office environment", whether it be surfing, uploads, or downloads.

Any thoughts on this to share? I'm just trying to understand Comcast's pricing scheme and how for 20-30 dollars more a month, the buffet becomes all you can eat. Does that 20-30 bucks really let Comcast make the necessary infrastructure investments to support uncapped service? Or are they simply trying to price residential customers out of the market so that they can actually support uncapped use on the existing infrastructure.

--
"We're going to start at one end of (Fallujah), and we're not going to stop until we get to the other. If there's anybody left when that happens, we're going to turn around and we're going to go back and finish it."
Lt. Col. Pete Newell: 1st Inf. US Army