dslreports logo
site
 
    All Forums Hot Topics Gallery
spc

spacer




how-to block ads


Search Topic:
uniqs
19918
share rss forum feed


devicemanage
Premium
join:2002-03-16
Chalfont, PA

Building My Own 15X15X8 Shed

I have been looking to buy a shed and home depot has a 10X10 for $699 but I would have to put it together and put on the roofing mateials.

I figure this for a 15X15 shed.
45 2x4x8 @ $3 for all 4 walls = $135
12 2x6x16 @ $11 for the floor = $132
16 1/4" 4x8 @ $22 Plywoood for floor and walls = $352
Total $619 not including tax shipping nails/screws and a soar back.

I am not sure how I would build the roof, I just can't wrap my brain around it.

Is this worth it? I am more than capable of doing the job and I can go with cheaper lumber too as it's just a shed. What do you guys think?
--
»www.devicemanager.net



Ken
Premium,MVM
join:2003-06-16
Markle, IN

You can buy premade roof trusses for mini barns, check with the contractor desk.


dbamber

join:2003-02-07
Payson, AZ
Reviews:
·Suddenlink
·CenturyLink
reply to devicemanage

I would suggest looking online for some plans with material lists. IMO you are off on your calculations of stock need. An example is your estimate of 2x4's. You need to double up your corners on at least two walls, all door and window openings. I am hoping that your plywood for floors, and walls would be at least 1/2 inch, and not 1/4 inch as your post states. I would also suggest making the shed 16x16 to make full use of 4x8 plywood. You will also need some sort of footings to keep the shed off the ground if you would like to have it last. You would need materials for roof rafters, ridge pole, roof shingles etc. A ramp, doors,& hardware would also be needed to easily remove heavy/large items. Good luck!


averagedude

join:2002-01-30
San Diego, CA
Reviews:
·Cox HSI

2 edits
reply to devicemanage

said by devicemanage:

I am not sure how I would build the roof, I just can't wrap my brain around it.

Is this worth it? I am more than capable of doing the job and I can go with cheaper lumber too as it's just a shed. What do you guys think?
My father-n-law did the same thing just last year (10x10).
He had a hard time figuring out the roof as well.
The answer was easy, he went to Home Depot with a pad of paper, pencil and a tape measure. He used the sheds on display as a template for what to do. He is pretty handy so the project turned out well.

The only reason he did it himself was because he go one year free financing from Home Depot Credit Card and he is retired.
I am not sure if he really "saved" any money but he had fun building it and being retired he had plenty of time.

If your going to cheap out on lumber you might as well get an aluminum shed kit.

Tuff shed is the manufacturer of most of Home Depots sheds.
»www.tuffshed.com/

One bit of advice...
I have found that sheds over 100 sq ft (10'x10') are usually covered under local building codes and jurisdictions. Often they have set back requirements from property lines and other requirements. My co-worker found out that for a "car" sized shed that a concrete foundation was required - seems obvious as he is storing a car in it. What was not obvious was that anchoring to the concrete. Because he bought a Tuff Shed the manufacturer was able to give him all the papers the city required and the anchoring engineering calculations to the concrete. I am sure other manufactures do the same thing. What was interesting to find out was that he could not pull a permit for the building if the plans showed electricity going to it. This particular city he was in said that if it had electricity to it for the permit then the square footage added to the house taxable square footage. He could have pulled the permit but he decided to add the power after wards.


Pacrat
Old and Cranky
Premium,MVM
join:2001-03-10
Cortland, OH
kudos:2
Reviews:
·Time Warner Cable

3 edits
reply to devicemanage

Foundation? Slab? Skids? 1/4" plywood will never make it for flooring!

Also, unless you're locked into 15x15, you might save some time and effort if you dimension your shed in multiples of 4' (e.g., 12x16).

Also, I'm not sure how ordinary plywood will do as siding. You may want to look at T-111 instead. And don't forget trim boards for the corners and door(s).

I built a 10x10 bulding on a slab foundation to house my pool filter some years ago. Nothing fancy... and by the time I was done, I had at least $1,200 into it. That had to be 10-12 years ago. I think you're being overly optimistic about your costs. You might get away a little cheaper by using a pole barn construction method! Most lumber yards around here will put together a package for that. Around here, anything over 200 sq. ft. req's a permanent foundation and a building permit, abiding by our 10' set backs.
--
I was born at night... but not last night!



devicemanage
Premium
join:2002-03-16
Chalfont, PA
reply to devicemanage

Wow thanks for all the replys...

You guys have made some very valid points here.

It does appear that I overlooked the doors and window so another dozen 2x4's will be in order ~$36.

The 16X16 makes all the sense in the world, less cuts and will speed things up.

The 1/2 plywood was not what I intended to use but I was adjust that and not sure about the cost - but shouldn't be a deal breaker.

Ihave a bunch of cinder blocks laying around and was going to put the floor up on them - should not be a problem - no?

As far as the township, I am fine and as long as I do not put a concrete base I will not get taxed on it. So the choice was obvious there...

Other costs I did not factor were the outside material, I was thinking on putting up siding to match the house and the roofing materials. I have not looking into those costs.

I did see on home depots website a large shed can cost anywhere upwards of $1700 - does this make sense to tackle this job this way? I dont care if it takes me a week to build it I just like projects.
--
»www.devicemanager.net



tschmidt
Premium,MVM
join:2000-11-12
Milford, NH
kudos:9
Reviews:
·G4 Communications
·Fairpoint Commun..
·Hollis Hosting

said by devicemanage:

I have a bunch of cinder blocks laying around and was going to put the floor up on them - should not be a problem - no?
Cinder blocks, on well drained soil, makes a good shed foundation. Shed is free standing you don't need foundation below frost level as long as everything moves the same amount.

If you want shed to last a long time use pressure treated wood for floor joists.

Framing a Gable roof is easy. Check out carpentry books and get a framing square.

What about: power, water, phone, and Ethernet? Does your shed need any services? If you are going to run any out to shed I'd recommend underground and drop in a empty conduit in case you need to add something later.

/tom


devicemanage
Premium
join:2002-03-16
Chalfont, PA

I might go with some electricity and maybe some exterior lighting. But mostly cosmetic stuff like shrubs, shutters, mulch etc...



StNickless

@tmodns.net
reply to devicemanage

If you have an attic in your house...
Get up there and look at how the roof is built.

You're in Pa, maybe someone has a barn with an interior exposed roof...if so, look and study.

It's not brain surgery, but it is time consuming.
Don't expect to build it in a week unless you're not working 8 hours a day somewhere else.

Figure it'll take 3-4 hours just to lay out your cinder blocks and get them perfectly level.
Don't set the blocks on dirt.
Set the blocks into small recesses you've dug in the ground and filled with something similar to creek stone or pea gravel.
It will be much more stable.


wth
Premium
join:2002-02-20
Iowa City,IA
reply to devicemanage

Why 15" x 15"? Since that's odd size compared to the std lengths of lumber. Could you build it 14x16 or 12x20?



ninjatutle
Premium

join:2006-01-02
San Ramon, CA
reply to devicemanage

Do you also have all the tools to get the job done?


wth
Premium
join:2002-02-20
Iowa City,IA
Reviews:
·Mediacom
reply to devicemanage

said by devicemanage:

16 1/4" 4x8 @ $22 Plywoood for floor and walls = $352

You'll need that 7/16 th's sheeting for the walls, and then covered with vinyl siding, or that wood 4x8 half inch rough sawn sheeting. And the floor would probably need 3/4" treated plywood.


devicemanage
Premium
join:2002-03-16
Chalfont, PA
reply to devicemanage

Wow there is some valuable information in this thread - thanks everyone... Helped me open my eyes!

I just spoke with the township and it looks like the shed is going to be 12x16 due to their taxing anything over 250 square feet - concrete base or not.

I have all the tools necessary as I recently remodelled the basement in my old house.

As far as the roof goes and forgive my lack of the correct terminology, but there would have to be a support for the front peak and the rear peak. Also a beam to run between peaks - what size lumber would you reccommend for these beams and then all the joists between? Would 2x6 be over kill? (I hope I was clear)
--
»www.devicemanager.net



Hydraglass
Premium
join:2002-05-08
Kingston, ON

I built a 12x14 shed in my yard last April - the total cost when I was done was under $1000.
The floor is 3/4 tongue in groove plywood typically used for subflooring.
The base is 2x6 PTL's in 12' lengths with the end caps being 2x6x14. Everything was screwed together using 3 1/2" #12 construction screws (green coated ones for the PTL).
The walls are all 2x4. my parts list for them had 50x 2x4x8, 6x 2x4x14 and 6x 2x4x12. With the openings for the doors (I did 2 x 3 foot wide, 7' high "barn door" style doors).
My exterior walls are the 7/16" pre-coated "barn board" style plywood that is pre-primed. 14 sheets of those at $20/ea.
I used "fence post base" concrete blocks - one at each corner and one at the mid section of every wall -- for a total of 8. They each sit on a 3' x 3' 2" thick concrete paver that sits on a bed of gravel where I dug the sod out of the yard. My ramp to the doors is built of those pavers as well.
I designed and built my own trusses for the rafters - in my design the shed is 14 feet long, 12 feet wide - my trusses were built to be 14' long so they "overhang" the side walls by a foot to allow the water to run off the roof and not hit the side of the building.

My trusses are built of a single 12' 2x6 across the bottom, an 8' 2x6 up each side, and 4 angled 2x4 diagonal support boards. I pre-built the trusses on the ground and set the ridge board in them once I had them stood up on the frame - that was the hardest part as I was doing it all alone. 11 total trusses - one created the front peak, one created the back peak, and 9 in between. Everything is on 16" centers or less.

The roof is 1/2" exterior grade sheathing plywood over the trusses with standard 25 year black "3 in 1" shingles.

This summer I added an electrical sub panel (6 circ. square D box) to have a 240V circuit for my band saw and my industrial space heater, a dedicated 15A circuit for lighting, a dedicated 20A circuit for an outlet for my compressor and another 20A circuit for the rest of the outlets. That wiring added $310 to the project (majority of that was for the #8 x 3 conductor cable to run from my main panel 54 feet, and the box/breakers).

Let me know if you have any questions about anything I did -- it's pretty similar to what you are doing. I did build my own windows at a significant savings, as I wasn't looking for anything "weather rated" -- I just built the frames on my table saw and used plexiglass from HD. I didn't want to use regular glass as I'm sure the kids in the neighbourhood would get a kick out of breaking that. It would have been close to $100/window to buy pre-hung windows - I made them for about $20 each by hand. (3' x 2' -- 2 windows - one on each long wall).

Unfortunately my digital camera is dead or I would go out and get a few pictures for you.


dingo4
Premium
join:2009-02-08
kudos:1
reply to devicemanage

7/16 or 1/2" for the walls and 3/4" treated for the floor...imo



nunya
Premium,MVM
join:2000-12-23
O Fallon, MO
kudos:12
Reviews:
·Charter
·voip.ms
·surpasshosting
reply to devicemanage

Click for full size
The lower framing.
Click for full size
Framing the loft and roof.
Click for full size
Siding, FIL supervising.
Click for full size
(Almost) Finished product.
I built a 12 x 12 a few years ago with a loft. The roof is pretty easy. Since it's such small square footage, it really doesn't bear any weight. I just let the tails run long and used hurricane straps to attach it to the knee walls. That way the only cuts you have to make are at the ridge.
There's two scissor kickers (not pictured) in the loft that tie the knees to the lower ridge so the knee walls don't blow out.

The hardest part was digging the footings. It's a PITA + a lot more concrete than you think. You'll notice some sag under the front door. I had to take up the floor and add an extra footing. Sucked immensely. Live and learn.

Turned out OK. The door is home made BTW, so it looks a little funky. I wanted 48" so I could get my rider in there.

It wound up costing over $2K with materials, wire, etc...
It probably would have been cheaper to go to Lowe's and buy a shed, but I like my custom job. It's nice to have lights and power too. I did throw a PVC water line in the trench for future use. There's also a conduit for the satellite and t.v. antenna to run back to the house.
--
Looks like Reverend Wright got his wish - God Damn America.


StNickless

@tmodns.net

No offense PE.

That is a textbook *do not do it this way* scaffolding job



nunya
Premium,MVM
join:2000-12-23
O Fallon, MO
kudos:12

Actually, that's a lot safer than what I normally see on "professional" job sites.
--
Looks like Reverend Wright got his wish - God Damn America.



wilbilt
Pronto Resurrected
Premium
join:2004-01-11
Oroville, CA
reply to devicemanage

I built an 8x12 a few years ago.

I built a jig right on the shed floor for putting the roof trusses together. After tacking the first truss together, I laid it on the floor and screwed short 2x3 blocks down in various places inside and outside the perimeter.

I then disassembled the truss and used the parts as patterns to cut the pieces for the rest of the trusses. I had some scrap pieces of 5/8" plywood to cut up for gussets.

Once I had all of the parts cut, it was just a matter of laying them into the jig and nailing them together. As each one was finished, I rolled it up into position on top of the walls.

It did not take long at all, and they all turned out the same.
--
We were taking a vote when the ground came up and hit us.


robbin
Premium,MVM
join:2000-09-21
Leander, TX
kudos:1
reply to nunya

nunya See Profile's idea to add a loft is a great idea. For the small additional expense, there is a lot of usable storage space.


Questor7

join:2006-04-10
Fredericksburg, VA
reply to devicemanage

Click for full size
Click for full size
I built this little shop/shed almost 8 years ago. It's 10x14 with 2 overhead lofts at each side. The materials and all ran me 3 grand here in VA at that time. I later ran a 220V feed and powered the whole thing throughout. You may want to go larger, my son, who's in he Navy has most of his junk in the lofts. After nine years of having it I wished I went the max my county allows, 20x10 (I'd have it 18x12).I would have also built out shelving and insulated it before storing any thing in it...I used Bear (Baer?) waterproofing over the T111 which does a real good job on insect/weaterproofing. Again I wish it was bigger


Pacrat
Old and Cranky
Premium,MVM
join:2001-03-10
Cortland, OH
kudos:2
Reviews:
·Time Warner Cable

They're never big enough! I had a 10x20 building built a few years ago. I figured it'd be more than enough for what I needed. I'm thinking very seriously about getting, yet, another one. it only takes a short time to fill one up. I'm beginning to think I have too much "stuff"!

I had it built and set by a little company locally that builds custom sheds and lawn furniture. It's on 4, 20' PTL 4x6 skids, so theorectically, it's a portable building.


I've been using portable ramp boards when needed. Still have to come up with something more convenient, though.
--
I was born at night... but not last night!

horsemouth
Please Clarify My CSP
Premium
join:2002-03-13
canada
reply to devicemanage

Hi good luck on your project.
I have built dozens of small sheds and can honestly say you are getting some good advice.
You are smart to build it yourself instead of going with a kit.
I like the idea of using 3/4 in. treated plywood on the floor.
One thing that I found is that you can get doors and windows cheep if you don't care about size swing ect.



aurgathor

join:2002-12-01
Lynnwood, WA
kudos:1
reply to devicemanage

I have built a 10x12 a couple of years ago. I wanted a 12x16 but because of the 120 sq ft rule, I decided to downsize.

It's based it on two 4"x6"x12' treated wood skids that stand on concrete blocks. The floor is 3/4" ply. Unless you really want a 16x16 shed, I'd rather go with 12x20 or 12x24 -- makes the roof simpler and easier.

While plywood normally comes in 4x8 sheets, you can special order a few other sizes such as 4x10 or 5x8. (mine uses three 4'x10' by 3/4" sheets for the floor)
--
And the winner is: