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magicjimmy

join:2006-03-23
Tucson, AZ

Approximate cost for labor to pour & finish concrete

I am in the EARLY planning stages for a backyard makeover guys.

I am looking for a ballpark figure for labor only to pour two concrete slabs, 8x8 ft and 12x8 ft. Both 6in deep with 12x12 footings on 6 8ft sides and 1 12ft side. 8th side is to be drilled and rebarred to existing slab. I figure total to be about 5.56 cubic yards to pour and finish.

The concrete will either need to be pumped to the backyard or hand carted. This is assuming two large pours like this cannot be done "a load at a time" with a portable mixer due to consistency and work time.

So what would YOU pay for this work?

TIA

Jim
--
...I'll go back in my cave now...



mityfowl
Premium
join:2000-11-06
Dallas, TX

4 edits

Most of these guys will just wheel barrow the concrete in. 6" is pretty thick for a deck, standard I think is 3-4". They will just bring in ready mix concrete truck(s).

Why so thick?

This isn't hard for the 5-6 labors to move 5-8 yards. Cost will depend on labor in your area. Will you prep and frame the area? Did footings?



Ken
Premium,MVM
join:2003-06-16
Markle, IN

1 edit
reply to magicjimmy

Around here something like that would probably go for $1200-$1500 in labor. That is assuming the contractor is going to excavate, form, pour, and finish.



magicjimmy

join:2006-03-23
Tucson, AZ
reply to mityfowl

The 8x8 pad is for a hot tub. the 12x8 is going to be a covered patio so I could probably get by with 4" there, but, the hot tub I would be more comfy with the 6 inches.
--
...I'll go back in my cave now...



magicjimmy

join:2006-03-23
Tucson, AZ
reply to Ken

I will be doing the excavation and forming, and will work with whomever I get to do the pour to make sure my work meets his specs. All I need is the labor to pour and finish.
--
...I'll go back in my cave now...



mityfowl
Premium
join:2000-11-06
Dallas, TX

If you talk to these cement guys none of them will recommend that you pour more than 3.5". Especially on top of that rock/sand base that is Tucson unless you're on a big hill. Its just a waste.

Call a couple guys they will help for free when they get some time and give you a good idea.



Pacrat
Old and Cranky
Premium,MVM
join:2001-03-10
Cortland, OH
kudos:2
reply to magicjimmy

I don't know about out there, but around here, concrete is $115/cu.yd. with a 3-yd. minimum. I'm guessing finishing would be as much.
--
I was born at night... but not last night!


horsemouth
Please Clarify My CSP
Premium
join:2002-03-13
canada
reply to magicjimmy

Hey you have done this before. I see you added a yard for the pumper.
In my city that will cost about 1,000 US. That is for broom finish. I recommend paying the extra $200.00 to have concrete tested if you plan on keeping the house.
OH..Don't let them trick you if you run short by a bit of concrete. Get them to break open the hopper on site. Just be ready for a mess.
My mom and dad lived in Sun City I think my price is also good for that city. No idea about Tucson.
OT for sure. Just wondering Did you guys have Jack Webb down in Tucson?



magicjimmy

join:2006-03-23
Tucson, AZ

1 edit

No clue who Jack Webb is...

Edit... "Dragnet"???
No idea. We just moved here a little under two years ago.



magicjimmy

join:2006-03-23
Tucson, AZ
reply to magicjimmy

After recieving news that the "windfall" we were going to pay for this project with is going to come in substantially less than we were hoping for, we are going to eliminate the 12x8 patio. For now anyway. That leaves just the 8x8 hot tub pad and a lattice breezway over it.

Side note...
I took plenty of before pics and will post photos of the project as it begins to materialize. I know how we all like pictures to look at in the morning~
--
...I'll go back in my cave now...



magicjimmy

join:2006-03-23
Tucson, AZ
reply to mityfowl

Actually, in my subdivision, there is surprisingly little rock or sand. I have dug down 18" to plant a couple trees and hit more of a clay material, not caliche, that was reasonably easy to dig at the 12" depth.

If the concrete guys I talk to think 4" is enough, then that's what I'll go with. Just looking for rough numbers at this point in the planning stage. If I get 6" numbers and end up going 4", then I know it will come in a little less expensive.

Thanks gang!
--
...I'll go back in my cave now...



Pacrat
Old and Cranky
Premium,MVM
join:2001-03-10
Cortland, OH
kudos:2

Don't forget some re-bar, or, at least, some re-mesh. It has to be cheaper than all that extra concrete would be.
--
I was born at night... but not last night!



magicjimmy

join:2006-03-23
Tucson, AZ

said by Pacrat:

Don't forget some re-bar, or, at least, some re-mesh. It has to be cheaper than all that extra concrete would be.
Absolutely. I plan on both rebar AND mesh. I have seen the effects of a poorly poured hot tub pad and don't ever want to deal with it.
--
...I'll go back in my cave now...


Daarken
Rara Avises
Premium
join:2005-01-12
Southwest LA
kudos:3
reply to magicjimmy

I recently priced out cement for my new home, its running around $96 a yard here.. It dropped from $110/yd back in January. In 2005 cement was going for $60/yd.
--
www.pointofexistence.com


horsemouth
Please Clarify My CSP
Premium
join:2002-03-13
canada
reply to magicjimmy

I remember my first day in Phoenix seeing a sidewalk that had Jack Webb 1959 stamped into it. I did ask some people about the company. All I ever found out was "They did a bunch of work around here" It is not important.



mityfowl
Premium
join:2000-11-06
Dallas, TX

1 edit
reply to magicjimmy

I would do it all at once when you have the guys there and put off something else. It will save you money(say that to the wifey) on concrete and labor.

If you don't have that Phoenix rock/sand you have to have a sand base too.

You can never have too much deck! I have over 1000 sq ft.


horsemouth
Please Clarify My CSP
Premium
join:2002-03-13
canada

said by mityfowl:

I would do it all at once when you have the guys there and put off something else. It will save you money(say that to the wifey) on concrete and labor.

If you don't have that Phoenix rock/sand you have to have a sand base too.

You can never have too much deck! I have over 1000 sq ft.
It is a 2 day job. You cant do the footing and the slab in the same day.


mityfowl
Premium
join:2000-11-06
Dallas, TX

2 edits

Do you really think this man needs footings for a deck?
You sure don't in Dallas.

I don't think the ground EVER freezes in Tuson.


horsemouth
Please Clarify My CSP
Premium
join:2002-03-13
canada

said by mityfowl:

Do you really think this man needs footings for a deck?
You sure don't in Dallas.

I don't think the ground EVER freezes in Tuson.
I have no idea if he does or not. That was not his question.


magicjimmy

join:2006-03-23
Tucson, AZ
reply to mityfowl

said by mityfowl:

Do you really think this man needs footings for a deck?
You sure don't in Dallas.
You do if you're going to put corner posts on it to support any kind of roof structure.

said by mityfowl:

I don't think the ground EVER freezes in Tuson.
No deep hard, freezes... But, it does freeze. Almost every winter. Freezing is below 32 for a couple hours right???
--
...I'll go back in my cave now...


mityfowl
Premium
join:2000-11-06
Dallas, TX

That doesn't mean the ground freezes and that's what counts.

Now in N. Illinois (for example) the ground freezes to 32" on some winters and you have to take that into account. So there you need 36" footings.



mityfowl
Premium
join:2000-11-06
Dallas, TX
reply to magicjimmy

Your really over engineering this.

Just figure out the deck and do it.

Use curves instead of squares.

Have fun. Good luck.


robbin
Premium,MVM
join:2000-09-21
Leander, TX
kudos:1
reply to mityfowl

Footings are not only for freeze protection but also to give structural strength for the slab. Whether or not they need to be a big as proposed I would definitely add some beams if I didn't want it to break. It is much easier to over-engineer than to tear it out and redo it later!


horsemouth
Please Clarify My CSP
Premium
join:2002-03-13
canada

said by robbin:

Footings are not only for freeze protection but also to give structural strength for the slab. Whether or not they need to be a big as proposed I would definitely add some beams if I didn't want it to break. It is much easier to over-engineer than to tear it out and redo it later!
How true. Just one question what do you mean by beams.

robbin
Premium,MVM
join:2000-09-21
Leander, TX
kudos:1

Around here they call them beams. My guess is that a footing is more to get below the freeze line. A beam is to provide strength. They not only run around the perimeter of a slab, but also in a grid pattern with larger slabs. Beams in a home slab are usually 12 x 12 with rebar in them on a 12 to 16 foot spacing between them. There is no real reason to use remesh if you properly install and tie rebar. The beams would have stirrups as well as pieces running the length of the beam and then the slab would probably have it on 12 in centers in both directions.


horsemouth
Please Clarify My CSP
Premium
join:2002-03-13
canada

I think I understand. We call that a mat. I have put footings 20ft. below grade and our frost line is only 3ft.
We use footings for support.
I think the op has done his home work and will be fine. I bet he even knows how many days to keep the slab wet after it is finished.



mityfowl
Premium
join:2000-11-06
Dallas, TX

1 edit

20' footings for a deck! WOW

Decks and fences aren't even consided perminate stuckture.


robbin
Premium,MVM
join:2000-09-21
Leander, TX
kudos:1
reply to horsemouth

said by horsemouth:

our frost line is only 3ft.
Around here the frost line depends on how tall the grass was before the freeze! Let's just say that 1" would be really stretching it on a 100 year freeze. The footing, beams, mat are only for the purpose of strength and it is all done in one pour.


Ken
Premium,MVM
join:2003-06-16
Markle, IN
reply to robbin

Around here we use the term footer for what you called a beam. Same thing, just a different name. While we do put our footers down 36" to get below the frost line, it doesn't change the engineering of the footer. Just instead of placing it on the surface you put it down in a trench, and then build a stem wall on top of it.


horsemouth
Please Clarify My CSP
Premium
join:2002-03-13
canada
reply to robbin

So what you are talking about is a trench filled with concrete?