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hayabusa3303
Over 200 mph
Premium
join:2005-06-29
kudos:1

my god

Qwest must be F* crazy.

Im guessing my theory was correct about these ISP smoking blunts.

Whats next qwest bail out money? after you kick about everyone off your network.


jadebangle
Premium
join:2007-05-22
00000
kudos:1
ATT is gonna implement caps too in june or july
Its coming hahaha

The cap are higher then tw but it still sucks
20gb-150gb depending on tier and type of service
1 dollar per gb overage extra charge
let say a tier with 20gb cap, you use 40gb billed 20 dollars more... This is absurd.
Why not offer metered tier instead of changing from unlimited to limited for all user?

me1212

join:2008-11-20
Pleasant Hill, MO
Isn't ATT breaking net neutrality? They use internet tv don't they? So I can watch all of their internet video I want, but only so much youtube/hulu/ect. I don't care what they say they are nothing but common criminals now! cable can get away wit hit because they don't use the internet for their video services, ATT(and other IPTV ISPs) do and if they have caps the are nothing but criminals.

Austinloop

join:2001-08-19
Austin, TX
kudos:1
The U-Verse TV is a separate entity from the internet stream. Much like the cable TV internet service and their phone service. The TV is on a separate stream until it hits the customer connection at the VRAD/FX box. The TV doesn't count against the internet stream. It is entirely different and is paid for as a separate service.

me1212

join:2008-11-20
Pleasant Hill, MO
Hmmmm ok, I heard it came over the internet.


djrobx
Premium
join:2000-05-31
Valencia, CA
kudos:2
Reviews:
·Time Warner Cable
·VOIPO
reply to me1212
They don't use "internet" TV, they use IPTV. Just because they use "internet protocol" doesn't mean they're using the public routed internet service - that service you pay a monthly fee for that's subject to certain speeds, possibly caps and net neutrality rules. Internet service is not even required for U-verse TV services to function. Nor is it required for U-verse Voice, their IP phone solution.

If you networked a couple computers together to transfer files, do they have internet access? Of course not. Just because they have IP addresses and can move data back and forth, doesn't mean they're utilizing the internet. AT&T's CallVantage service does require public routed internet service to work. So use of that would be subject to metering.

This comes up again and again. I'm not a fan of the AT&T cap, but trying to say that AT&T is doing something wrong by not including their IPTV data in the cap is ridiculous. Yes, its delivered over the same pipe, but it's a different service, billed for separately.
--
AT&T U-Hearse
Your funeral. Delivered.

Austinloop

join:2001-08-19
Austin, TX
kudos:1
reply to me1212
So you condemn a company or person for something you heard, interesting.

me1212

join:2008-11-20
Pleasant Hill, MO

1 edit
it was explaned to me differently, sorry.

So how does it come from them to a house if it does not come over the internet?

Austinloop

join:2001-08-19
Austin, TX
kudos:1
In each subdivision, there is a device called a VRAD, it is usually located in close proximity to the cross connect box for that area. The VRAD brings in the IPTV signals and also the the U-Verse DSL. These are separate signals on the fiber cable coming to the VRAD.

I believe that the overall U-Verse signal is in the neighborhood of 25 to 30 meg. Of that, up to 10 meg may be used for internet signal depending on what the customer ordered. The remainder of the bandwidth is used for the TV signal. Ergo, the IPTV signal does not impinge on "neutrality" of the internet because they are separate streams of data. Reread what I said about cableco's and their telephone data stream and the "neutral" internet signal. They use the same conductor to get to the house, but are distinct streams.

I am sure you can do a google search if you desire further information. To make a long story short, IPTV, as implemented by AT&T does not violate that illusive thing called net neutrality.

me1212

join:2008-11-20
Pleasant Hill, MO
Ok, thanks.ATT could have made this much easier on every1 by just using pure fiber, look at the speeds FiOS can make ATT would have been able to do that too.


koolkid1563
Premium,MVM
join:2005-11-06
Powell, WY
reply to me1212
AT&T's video never touches the actual 'internet'. It is all kept on their own private network.

Lazlow

join:2006-08-07
Saint Louis, MO
reply to djrobx
There is a link though. If you have 18Mbps Uverse and you start watching HD streams(on Uverse) your internet speeds will drop to 8Mbps(roughly). So it is sharing bandwidth between the TV side and the HSI side.


koolkid1563
Premium,MVM
join:2005-11-06
Powell, WY
Only from the RG to the VRAD though. There is only 25Mb/s from the RG to the VRAD downstream, so that has to be shared between all services. That doesn't mean the TV is internet and vice versa though.

Lazlow

join:2006-08-07
Saint Louis, MO
But it does mean that it IS shared bandwidth.


hayabusa3303
Over 200 mph
Premium
join:2005-06-29
kudos:1
reply to me1212
said by me1212:

ATT could have made this much easier on every1 by just using pure fiber,
that would require too much thinking on att part.

fiberguy
My views are my own.
Premium
join:2005-05-20
kudos:3
reply to me1212
"Internet" implies that it's going over the public network.. however, it runs over ATT's INTRAnet.. or neighborhood network. The "internet", if you will, is a term coined to describe various networks tied together in peering.

Just like Comcast doesn't operate their phone over the "internet", neither does att's uverse television. It's just transported via bits and bytes and not analog.

In that case, perhaps cable's digital cable would be on "the internet" too then.

Lazlow

join:2006-08-07
Saint Louis, MO
Firberguy

There is a difference though. Both cable TV and Comcast's phone offering do not share the same bandwidth as the internet(watching TV or talking on the phone does not effect your internet speed). att's does.

fiberguy
My views are my own.
Premium
join:2005-05-20
kudos:3
.. I know this.. and it doesn't matter.. it's not "the internet" until you get to the cloud..

The available bandwidth to the home is not the same as the available bandwidth out the gateway. It doesn't become "internet" until you're actually connected to another network.

And, to be honest, Yes, Comcast's phone DOES use the same "bandwidth" as the modem service. If your modem loses sync, you will lose phone, even with an eMTA and separate modem. Do they use a QoS to keep bandwidth available for the phone service over traffic destined for the internet? .. sure. ATT, however, dynamically uses the same pool of last mile bandwidth.

Still, trying to black and white everything into one bucket or another doesn't work as many try to do on BBR. But, I suppose since the providers like to play semantics so can everyone else.


koolkid1563
Premium,MVM
join:2005-11-06
Powell, WY

1 edit
reply to Lazlow
I guess by that logic then even my FTTH service up here uses the 'internet' for TV (even though the TV never actually gets handed off to the actual internet) since they both ride the same GigE link from the ONT to my switch. While 1Gb/s is quite a lot, the TV still uses a chunk of it as does the internet and are therefore still sharing that bandwidth.

Lazlow

join:2006-08-07
Saint Louis, MO
Fiberguy

NO, Comcast does not need to run QOS on HSI to keep bandwidth available for their phone offering. Their phone service runs on a separate dedicated channel. No matter how much load their is on a HSI channel it has zero (0) effect on their phone system. This is what makes att's system different. On att's system(Uverse) if you have 18Mbps service and HD channels your HSI slows down when you watch HD channels, on Comcasts system no matter how much TV/phone you watch/listen it has no effect on your HSI speed.

Lazlow

join:2006-08-07
Saint Louis, MO
reply to koolkid1563
koolkid1563

No, again because on FIOS TV the signal goes on a different frequency (light)(again a dedicated channel) over the fiber. No, matter how much TV you watch it does not slow down your HSI. Even if it was, a HD stream is 19Mbps, so 1000Mbps -19Mbps = 981Mbps. Which is far faster than any US home service, again it is not slowing down your HSI.


koolkid1563
Premium,MVM
join:2005-11-06
Powell, WY

4 edits
I don't have FiOS here, it is TCT through the Powellink muni FTTH network. From the ONT to my main switch there is one Cat5e cable running at 1Gb/s which carries both TV and data/inet. From the switch it goes to the two STBs which feed three TVs each and from the switch it also goes to my router's WAN port.

So let me get this straight, even if the bandwidth is shared between the services on a setup such as mine, as long as the sharing doesn't conflict with each other they are OK?

Lazlow

join:2006-08-07
Saint Louis, MO
As long as one does not slow/prevent the other from working, it does not matter. If a change has no effect, is it really a change?