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This is a sub-selection from 3GB a month, slightly more?


mob
On the next level..
Premium
join:2000-10-07
Reviews:
·SureWest Internet
reply to klipko

Re: 3GB a month, slightly more?

Why can't we just pay for what we use? Why not offer transfer in 100GB blocks and say "no limit on speed or what you use it on, but once it's gone, you pay $10.00 for 100GB more transfer for the month."

That way people who don't use much bandwidth would pay less, since they would only pay for 1 block, and if you used more bandwidth, you paid more. Of course, there could need to be some form of "no limit" service that would have a cap of over 2TB or so, at a price point that is attractive, yet still obscenely profitable for the providers (since we all know that bandwidth is cheap, no matter what shills say).

That way people who try to download the entire internet will pay for what they use, and the people who don't will pay very little.
--
If we do not succeed, then we run the risk of failure - J. Danforth Quayle
Ich habe kein Mitleid - Me

me1212

join:2008-11-20
Pleasant Hill, MO
You got a GREAT idea there. the cost of band width has gone down 18% from this time last year so I think you plan would work very well. I think there are cell phone cos that do that y would it not work for ISPs?


Nemokrad

join:2002-04-24
Miami, FL
reply to mob
You wish, companies are trying to make MORE money, not less.

iansltx

join:2007-02-19
Austin, TX
kudos:2
reply to mob
I have friends who run BitTorrent over Qwest and suck up a fair amount of banwidth. They haven't been shut off yet. Just sayin'

patcat88

join:2002-04-05
Jamaica, NY
kudos:1
reply to mob
said by mob:

Why can't we just pay for what we use? Why not offer transfer in 100GB blocks and say "no limit on speed or what you use it on, but once it's gone, you pay $10.00 for 100GB more transfer for the month."

That way people who don't use much bandwidth would pay less, since they would only pay for 1 block, and if you used more bandwidth, you paid more. Of course, there could need to be some form of "no limit" service that would have a cap of over 2TB or so, at a price point that is attractive, yet still obscenely profitable for the providers (since we all know that bandwidth is cheap, no matter what shills say).

That way people who try to download the entire internet will pay for what they use, and the people who don't will pay very little.
Your crazy prices will make ARPU drop faster than a stock price after bankruptcy filing.

How about $10 a GB? That undercuts what cellular carriers charge.

We can run all of our non-SLA broadband off one 40 gigabit ethernet line at 5GB per customer per month (3 million broadband customers i guesstimate).

The Antihero

join:2002-04-09
Enola, PA
reply to mob
You mean like the early days of dialup, where you had to constantly worry about how much you were on, and how high your next bill was going to be?

Thanks, but no thanks.


system001

@theplanet.com
reply to patcat88
do the math at 7mbps you get 604.8 gigs a day. 60 seconds x 60 minutes x 24 hours x 7 mb = 604,800 mb / 1000 = 604.80 gigs. what we need to do is limit the isp's to no more than 1 million customers nation wide, and make sure that in every market there are at least 4 choices. 5 gigs a month is nothing.

openbox9
Premium
join:2004-01-26
Germany
kudos:2
Don't forget to convert bits to bytes

What good does limiting an ISP's customer base to 1 million do? How do you ensure "at least 4 choices" for each market?


system001

@qwest.net
currently the cities decide what isp's are in their city and what section of the city they are in. with fiber optics we have had the ability to carry far more than what is being allowed. The cities deliberately limit service in an area. as for the math it is correct. 60 x 60 x 24 = 86,400 seconds in a day, and at 7mb's per second that comes to 604,800 mb's a day or 604.8 gigs a day. limiting isp's to 1 million customers means that there would have to be more isp's created which equates to more competition, which equate to lower prices for faster service.

openbox9
Premium
join:2004-01-26
Germany
kudos:2
said by system001 :

currently the cities decide what isp's are in their city and what section of the city they are in.
Are you discussing franchise agreements for video providers? Or perhaps the use of the ROW?
said by system001 :

with fiber optics we have had the ability to carry far more than what is being allowed. The cities deliberately limit service in an area.
Source? I seriously doubt any city limits fiber optic throughput.
said by system001 :

as for the math it is correct. 60 x 60 x 24 = 86,400 seconds in a day, and at 7mb's per second that comes to 604,800 mb's a day or 604.8 gigs a day.
Correct, if you want to discuss gigabits per day as a rate. If you want to discuss quantity, you divide by 8 since there are 8 bits in a byte
said by system001 :

limiting isp's to 1 million customers means that there would have to be more isp's created which equates to more competition, which equate to lower prices for faster service.
No it doesn't. It means that you have less economy of scale. Limiting a service provider to x number of customers does nothing to guarantee competition.

cyclone_z

join:2006-06-19
Ames, IA
reply to system001
said by system001 :

as for the math it is correct. 60 x 60 x 24 = 86,400 seconds in a day, and at 7mb's per second that comes to 604,800 mb's a day or 604.8 gigs a day.
You must work for Verizon Wireless.
»www.verizonmath.com
604.8 gigs of WHAT per day? Bits or bytes? If you started out with units in BITs (7 megaBIT connection), you end up with a value of 604.8 gigaBITs, not gigaBYTES.
If you want to convert it to bytes, you have to divide by 8 because a bit and a byte are different units!


tubbynet
reminds me of the danse russe
Premium,MVM
join:2008-01-16
Chandler, AZ
kudos:1
reply to mob
said by mob:

Why can't we just pay for what we use? Why not offer transfer in 100GB blocks and say "no limit on speed or what you use it on, but once it's gone, you pay $10.00 for 100GB more transfer for the month."
because peak demand and 95th percentile billing rule out this as a viable option. isps who purchase their bandwidth don't pay in overall consumption, they pay based on peak demand. the reason large users are being booted is because they are (often incorrectly) assumed to be sucking the most bandwidth at all hours and causing peak bandwidth shortages. the issue here is not the method of metered billing being used, its a matter of finding a way to balance the oversubscription and upgrades with the maximum possible roi and still making sure the customer's experience is satisfactory. most isps haven't found this balance yet. until then, stories, speculation, and armchair quarterbacking abound...

q.


Tucson

@cox.net
reply to iansltx
Like anyone could possibly go past the cap with their crappy slow connection.

mdrift

join:2003-08-15
Spokane, WA
Reviews:
·CenturyLink
reply to system001
said by system001 :

do the math at 7mbps you get 604.8 gigs a day. 60 seconds x 60 minutes x 24 hours x 7 mb = 604,800 mb / 1000 = 604.80 gigs. what we need to do is limit the isp's to no more than 1 million customers nation wide, and make sure that in every market there are at least 4 choices. 5 gigs a month is nothing.
I agree. The problem is each Telco has a regional monopoly. You just gotta love Reagan deregulation. Instead of one monstrosity each region has a single monstrosity--and that's called Capitalism?

mdrift

join:2003-08-15
Spokane, WA
Reviews:
·CenturyLink
reply to cyclone_z
said by cyclone_z:

said by system001 :

as for the math it is correct. 60 x 60 x 24 = 86,400 seconds in a day, and at 7mb's per second that comes to 604,800 mb's a day or 604.8 gigs a day.
You must work for Verizon Wireless.
»www.verizonmath.com
604.8 gigs of WHAT per day? Bits or bytes? If you started out with units in BITs (7 megaBIT connection), you end up with a value of 604.8 gigaBITs, not gigaBYTES.
If you want to convert it to bytes, you have to divide by 8 because a bit and a byte are different units!
Correct, but irregardless converting to bytes still shows that false notion of 1-3 GBytes of data transfer being normal. It's absurd.


system001

@qwest.net
reply to openbox9
it would be nice if you had any real idea. the cities do decide what cable/internet franchises are allowed into what part of the city. fiber optics were put in place with the original promise of more competition. as for the math once again it is correct. there is no dividing by 8. with 7mb service your monthly cap is 18,144 gigs even if we did divide by 8 your monthly cap would 2,268 gigs a month not this 250 and under a lot of isp's are talking about. granted most people will never even come near this level of use. i also stated what we need to do is limit the isp's to no more than 1 million customers nation wide, and make sure that in every market there are at least 4 choices. if you are going to quote someone make sure you do not rephrase what they said.


system001

@qwest.net
reply to cyclone_z
broadband services work with bytes not bits. there is no conversion. the isp's flat out state your service will be 4, 6, 7, 12, 20, 50 MEGABYTES PER SECOND. not once do they ever mention bits. this is the type of confusion isp's love so they can cheat you out of promised bandwidth.


system001

@qwest.net
reply to mdrift
deregulation is the problem. when most industries started to be deregulated i was 14 and i told my parents that they were not going to pay the price for it, but rather i was 20 to 30 years down the road. well it is 30 years now and the mess we are in is because of greedy unregulated businesses.

cyclone_z

join:2006-06-19
Ames, IA
reply to system001
said by system001 :

broadband services work with bytes not bits. there is no conversion. the isp's flat out state your service will be 4, 6, 7, 12, 20, 50 MEGABYTES PER SECOND. not once do they ever mention bits. this is the type of confusion isp's love so they can cheat you out of promised bandwidth.
i don't know if you're saying they can't be converted or that ISPs are advertising speeds in bytes, but that's also not true. Megabits per second is abbreviated as Mbps. If you're talking megabytes per second, usually that's MBps, however, megabytes per second is a very uncommon measurement of transfer speed. Transfer speeds have always been measured in bits, not bytes. Go read the wikipedia article here and you will see only bits/second measured; never bytes.
»en.wikipedia.org/wiki/DSL